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Thread: Rond anchors

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
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    Default Rond anchors

    .
    Rond anchors are anchors with only a single fluke (and a single purpose.) Readers of Arthur Ransome's "Coot Club" and "The Big Six" will be familiar with the use of rond anchors for mooring alongside a riverbank or 'rond'. In such situations they can be very handy gadgets to have along, particularly where the ground is soft and there are only reeds or clumps of grass to make fast to. You simply take the anchor ashore, stamp the fluke into the ground, and there's you mooring point.

    Since I couldn't find a design for such an anchor I designed one myself about ten years ago for Aileen Louisa. The drawing has just been re-edited and is now posted on our website here, and while it's copyright I'd thought I'd advertise the link so that anyone who'd like to make up one for their own use can do so.

    Normally such an item would be galvanised, but in today's world, unless you have several other items to be galvanised at the same time, there's a good chance it will be cheaper if made from stainless steel.

    This anchor I estimate will do for boats up to, say, 18' or so, and of course it could be scaled up for larger vessels.

    Because there's only one fluke, the anchor can be stowed nearly flat and out-of-the-way, even on a small dinghy. If you put a soft eye in the end of the painter or mooring warp, then when you need to use the anchor you simply thread the eye through the anchor-ring, slip it back over the fluke, and haul taut. (You're less likely to trip over the line if the standing part exits the anchor-ring from underneath.)

    If you're a riverbank user I should think you might find this a useful piece of equipment to carry.

    Mike
    Visit us to see how we help people complete classic boats authentically.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
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    Norwich,United Kingdom
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    Default Re: Rond anchors

    I hadn't considered that other boaters would struggle to find rond anchors,they are almost universal on the rivers here.Quite inexpensive too http://www.norfolkmarine.co.uk/shop-...i4t4tnonafh1n4 probably not worth importing them to Australia,given freight costs.

  3. #3
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    Woodbridge, Suffolk, UK
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    Default Re: Rond anchors

    Surprisingly useful things; I used to carry one in Piglet.

    Easier than a Fisherman to stamp into a beach.
    IMAGINES VEL NON FUERINT

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Rond anchors

    I couldn't get into that skinny water.....
    Wakan Tanka Kici Un
    ..a bad day sailing is a heckuva lot better than the best day at work.....
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  5. #5
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    Default Re: Rond anchors

    There was a guy in Setauket long ago who used his fisherman as a rond from time to time. He'd sawed off one fluke as he was tired of fouling the fluke if the boat reveresed in light air. If you just set the anchor easily you'll always get the fluke side down and if you've any doubt you can do as you'd do in rocky ground anyway and let it down with a trip line to the crown.

    So for shore use he'd carry the anchor ashore without its cross bar.

    This was for a big old catboat, maybe 28' or something.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Rond anchors

    Mike's design is very robust, English ronds are only 1/2 inch bar, 12 inch shank and about 8 inch arm.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  7. #7
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    Default Re: Rond anchors

    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Craig-Bennett View Post
    Easier than a Fisherman to stamp into a beach.

    This brought to mind a beautiful morning on the grand union somewhere up around Warwickshire. we'd stayed out in the middle of the country just anchored up to the towpath.

    Wake up , put kettle on , throw cabin doors open only to find a fisherman sitting right there at the stern of the boat (on a little stool),and beyond him more , and more , and more fisherman as far as you could see, all about 10 or 15 ft apart .

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Rond anchors

    .
    Thanks for your comments, guys.

    I'm interested that the ones in John's link are (as I would consider) so light-weight. My prototype was made from 3/4" bar and I decided it was too light -- it was flexing sufficiently that I was a little bit (although only a little bit) worried as to whether it might straighten out sufficiently under load to draw the fluke out of soft ground. (That's also why I put the 15 reverse angle on the end.) I imagine the diagonal brace on the ones shown is to avoid just that possibility. (It also gives you a tripping-line attachment point too I suppose, although I've never needed that.) Anyway, that and the fact that my smallest fisherman has a 1" shank decided me to upsize the design to 1" also.

    Another modification in the prototype was made from the drawing posted, in that the eye was made from a short piece of steel bent into a sort of bow-shackle shape, with its ends welded to each side of the stock. It worked okay, but the straight U-shape that would have been easier to bend would probably be too tight a squeeze. I don't like the loose ring shown in those catalogue drawings quite as much (though all my other anchors have them.)

    I confess I didn't do a search for a rond-anchor design at the time, but I don't know whether the search engines of ten years ago would have produced anything of much interest anyway -- I just decided I needed one so I designed it.

    (I note that Googling for 'rond anchor' now produces several hits, but on the first page of results nothing that could be used as a basis for a sound design.)

    Mike
    Visit us to see how we help people complete classic boats authentically.

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