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Thread: End of an era Port Adelaide

  1. #1
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    Default End of an era Port Adelaide

    On May 31st, over 150 years of boatbuilding and repair will come to an end with the closure of Searles boatyard, the last boatyard in Port Adelaide, South Australia.

    Searles has been going for over 80 years and has built many boats, which are well regarded. Many of these boats are still sailing. Searles has become the woodenboat centre of Adelaide.

    This has been brought about by the Land Management Corporation, which is a South Australian government organisation. They are the landlords for Searles. The proprietor, Kingsley Haskett, has been engaged in a protracted battle with the LMC over this matter but now has finally had to accept defeat. My understanding is that he has been prevented from talking to the media for fear of jeopardising any compensation, which I dont think has been much for a lifetime of work.

    The Port Adelaide is being redeveloped, stages 1 & 2 have been completed, Searles is located in the area for stage 7 as I understand it. The LMC claim they are 5 years away from needing the Searles site. With economic downturn and sales apparently going slow for stage 2 (they were throwing in a BMW/Merc to try and boost sales), it could be 10 or 15 years before they get to stage 7.

    They have apparently signed a contract with the developers to provide a clear site several years ago, so pre-empting any of the community consultation.

    This is just so wrong, the bastards are taking out culture away, it could been win/win but of course it has to be win/lose. The LMC/developers have no imagination, this is more that just the money, with Searles, they have something authentic. Once this is gone, it is gone forever. I suppose we’ll get a granite paver with a few inscriptions about the history. You could stand the thing up and you would have tombstone, how appropriate!

    They could have incorporated some of the boatyards into the development. This would have made the development more interesting, given the local community more “ownership”, created some tourism potential.

    This is just dumb!

  2. #2
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    Default Re: End of an era Port Adelaide

    I sympathise - this is wrong. Maybe on a smaller scale, this reminds me of the story of Jensens boatyard (Jensen Motor-Boat Co) here in Seattle - but Jensens has survived. It is the last full service boatyard on the water within the City of Seattle that caters, it seems exclusively, to the wooden boat owner. I think that is a fair statement. If not absolutely accurate, then there is no other place that can match it's history. Jensens has been part of the Seattle waterfront for three generations, with many milestones. It lives in the shadow of the sprawling University of Washington campus. Literally. The oceanography complex towers beside it. The university wanted that land in the worst way, decades ago. Anchor Jensen fought them for years. He got the community behind him. There were petitions, I can't tell you the whole story. Even though the boatyard property is family owned, it took a significant and sustained effort to beat back pressure from the University and the City. It was a tough winter here but as far as I know the yard is still a going concern.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: End of an era Port Adelaide

    The following article is here.

    http://portside-messenger.whereilive...d-battle-lost/




    KINGSLEY Haskett’s battle to keep afloat 170 years of Port boat building history is over.
    The Searle’s Boatyard owner ceased trading last week, marking the end of nearly two centuries of maritime activity in the Port’s Inner Harbour.
    “All the boats are gone, we’re now just cleaning up the sheds and working out what to do with everything,” said Mr Haskett, 62.
    “It’s the end of an era, you’ll never see it again.”
    Searle’s was the last Birkenhead boatyard to close, evicted by the State Government to make way for future stages of the Newport Quays waterfront redevelopment.
    After starting at Searle’s as a 15-year-old apprentice shipwright and boat builder in 1963, Mr Haskett embarked on a career as a merchant seaman, before returning to the boatyard full time in 1994 when he bought a share of the business with Bryan Mellor and Roger Knill.
    He bought Searles’ outright five years ago.
    Mr Haskett said his long campaign to preserve the boat-building tradition in the Port had been difficult, but he had no regrets.
    “If you believe you are right you have to fight you’ve got to stand up for what you believe in.”
    He planned to take a short break to consider his future employment options.
    Long-time friend Keith Flint said Mr Haskett’s fight with the Land Management Corporation came at a personal cost.
    “I think Kingsley is a lion of a man, so passionate about the shipbuilding industry, a wonderful tradesman who has taught so many in the game,” Mr Flint said.
    “It’s so upsetting to see him go through this ... he’s fought a hard fight.
    “He’s not broken but they’ve worn him down to a terrible extent.
    “His loss is Port Adelaide’s and SA’s loss too.”
    Another friend Geoff Wallbridge described Mr Haskett as a larger than life character with a passion for preserving the maritime history of the Port.
    “He has carried the heritage of Searle’s Boatyard on his shoulders and struggled valiantly against the weight of bureaucracy, but he lost the battle,” Mr Wallbridge said.
    “He has a different vision for Port from the government and the developers and he has done a lot more than just look after his own commercial interest.”


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    Default Re: End of an era Port Adelaide

    so why don't yall Aussi's fight it? sounds like he went it alone.

    some of ya got land on the water pony up. IMO if it's valuable to ya don't let it die.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: End of an era Port Adelaide

    These resumptions are a tragic world wide phenomenon.

    I had never heard of this one before.

    Brisbane is 1200 miles from Adelaide.

    I think in this case the big money would have won in the end anyway.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: End of an era Port Adelaide

    It is very sad to see the old port disappearing. And the loss of facilities (and skills) to build and maintain not just wooden boats, but any boats. This has been in the planning for decades. These yards, and the old Port Adelaide Sailing Club, have always been on leased Crown land-and were never granted any secure, long term tenure. Adelaide is an odd place-basically 100 miles of straight coastline with a flat beach, and just one port. And the port is really being shut down and converted to canal housing. We are much more reliant on land based transport, trucks in particular, than sea. The government just doesn't seem to get that we even have a maritime heritage. And they think pleasure boating is about going fishing in a tinny which can be launched from a ramp almost anywhere. I'm not sure that small to medium sized wooden boats will survive here at all for much longer. None will be built commercially. There will be no-one who can offer professional maintenance. The only mooring facilities are now expensive marinas-which will be less and less inclined to even take wooden boats. To buy a long term lease on a marina berth costs more than the value of most wooden boats. The whole infrastructure and environment that used to support boats with a value of less than about $80,000.00 just doesn't exist any more. Its really sad.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: End of an era Port Adelaide

    Agreed py , my father's family came from just down the road from Port , Semaphore .I can still remember that yard from my boyhood .

    Speaking of South Australia's marine heritage , Dad could recall the Port skyline as being a sea of masts pre WW1 .Times have indeed changed .
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

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    Default Re: End of an era Port Adelaide

    The only thing that might have saved this would have been some loud community support. Trouble is, I think the community were placated with some well orchestrated community consultation while the deals were being done.

    Other thing is I dont know if the strategy of using the National Trust was particularly wise, the National Trust isn't about confrontation.

    Also, from a wider community perspective, the interests of a hundred or so wooden boat owners "rich yachties", is probably not so important.

    However, everyone benefits from the visual richness of maritme activities. All that we'll see in the inner port now will small/medium size fibreglass powerboats in a marina setting that could be anywhere in the world.

    I'm uncertain of the support or interest of the local council but I don't think there was much.

    The only thing governments respond to is noise, nothing else seems to work.

    As usual, power and money prevail.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: End of an era Port Adelaide

    Sounds depressingly familiar.
    Where I've seen this there are always consultations with "stakeholders".
    Somehow the developers and financiers are always included as stakeholders.
    The developer holds no stake at all- he's a shark who swims past, takes a bite, and moves on to the next territory.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: End of an era Port Adelaide

    What's the difference between a developer and a catfish?
    One's a bottom dwelling scum sucker, and the other one's a fish.
    be modest, and be proud of it.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: End of an era Port Adelaide

    Hello all.

    This is my first post. I am a freelance writer and blue water sailor. I have around 25,000 sea miles under my old rope belt, including 5 Sydney Hobart races, two of those as sailing master. I love sailing in, working on and writing about almost anything that floats.

    I'm presently working on an article about the closure of Searles Boatyard in Port Adelaide, South Australia. I'm sorry it's not on a happier topic.

    Because of the still limited range of coal-fired steamers, Adelaide has with the Chilean nitrate ports the distinction of being among the last major ports in the world to be served by commercial sailing ships. The tall ships of the redoubtable Captain Erikson of Marieham in Finland were still visiting Port Adelaide's Inner Harbour in the 1950's.

    Now, the South Australian government of Premier Mike Rann has closed down the remaining maritime businesses in the Inner Harbour - the boatyards and slipways at Jenkins Street, Birkenhead - to accommodate the stalled 'Newport Quays' housing development.

    On April 15th this year, Searles Boatyard followed its neighbours into oblivion, going down with full order books and with its half dozen employees hard at work to the last.

    The yard has now been cleared, with some of the machinery sold or cut up for scrap. The government will bulldoze the building in the next few weeks.

    You can see what has been lost at Searles by looking at the work of two photographers, paperbarque1 and Mangrove Rat, who share a great feeling for the unnecessary loss:

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/paperbarque

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/imagegallery

    Here are a few salient facts about the way Searles has been treated:

    The South Australian Government's Land Management Corporation is a partner, with (now) Brookfield Multiplex and Urban Construct in the Newport Quays development in Port Adelaide.

    The development stalled last year at Stage 2. Searles Boatyard is on land slated for Stage 7. The original timetable had Stage 7 not commencing for 3-5 years. Now there is no date fixed for commencement.

    Adjacent Searles Boatyard is the Royal Australian Navy's wharf and training facility, on which substantial sums have recently been spent. My research indicates that the Navy has no intention of leaving.

    There is a class action underway by numerous unhappy buyers of apartments in the development, citing misrepresentation and breach of contract.

    One of the partners in the consortium, Multiplex, was taken over in June 2007 by international asset management and construction giant Brookfield Asset Management.

    The Rann government, Searles' landlord, has for 10 years prevented Searles from upgrading their building.

    The Rann government has prevented Searles from taking on apprentices because Searles has had only a short, renewable tenure. Technically, a lease of 4 years or more is required before a workshop can take on apprentices.

    While the Rann government has in the case of renovations and demolitions at Adelaide Oval and the Freemasons Hall in Adelaide supported the concept that heritage value can lie in the continuing use of the site for its original purpose, in order to allow demolition if that use continues, it has expressly denied the validity of the same concept in the case of Searles Boatyard, saying that only places can have heritage value, not uses.

    While the South Australian Government has backed the development to the hilt, the Treasurer Mr Kevin Foley has aligned himself particularly closely with the Newport Quays consortium and the Newport Quays development, defending both on numerous occasions during the lengthy 'public consultation' period. The concerns expressed by the public were generally ignored in the design of the development.

    There have been movements in employment of executives between the LMC and the Newport Quays consortium.

    The Newport Quays consortium has donated AUD$660,000 to the South Australian Rann government, using various tactics to keep its donation under the radar.

    LMC (Searles' landlord) is a partner in the 'Marina Adelaide' development 6kms away downriver. LMC has offered Searles space at that marina at a rate 15 times Searles' present rent for less than 50% of the area and without the capacity to slip large boats. Searles cannot economically take up the offer. LMC made similar offers to the other closed Birkenhead boatyards none of whom found the offer realistic.

    No boat launching ramp, marine workshop or fuel outlet is planned for the Newport Quays development, despite the total of 600 marina berths to be provided at Newport Quays. All boat launching (for which there is a fee), fuelling and repairs are to take place at Marina Adelaide.

    The South Australian government's claim that Searles Boatyard was a source of pollution seems tenuous and is not supported by any available tests or figures. Given the timber boat work that was Searles' principal business, the care Searles took to collect glues, liquids and dusts, and the fact that the water at the Searles slipway is invariably sweet and clear with small fish and marine flora evident, the claim seems to have no basis. In any case, private owners, surreptitiously pumping bilges and doing other work on their boats rather than make the trip to Marina Adelaide to patronise the single LMC-connected boatyard there would be likely to create more pollution than Searles' controlled operation. In any case, Searles has an EPA licence at least until 2012.

    As 'D Day' approached, LMC made it a condition of Searles' tenure that no representative of any media was allowed to be on the boatyard property at any time, nor was the proprietor or any employee allowed to speak to any media.

    The South Australian government is adamant that the state does not need an independent commission against corruption.

    I should also say that I worked at Searles on weekends during 1974, stripping and varnishing the beautiful mahogany hull of the Borresen-built Dragon keelboat 'Siena'.

    Please PM me if you have or would like further information or corroboration for my claims.
    Last edited by stumpjumper; 05-28-2009 at 09:02 AM.

  12. #12
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    Default Re: End of an era Port Adelaide

    This is a remarkable thread with echoes and reminders of the Jensen battle, as Eric has mentioned. I'll be watching it as it develops, as I'm sure many of us will.

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    Default Re: End of an era Port Adelaide

    Stumpjumper, firstly welcome to the forum mate, a very interesting article that you've written there but one that has left me feeling angry and helpless in the face of what is essentially unbelievable criminal behaviour. Makes you wonder of this is taking place in SA or Queensland???

    As a freelance journo are you in a position to take this to a higher level? Maybe create a stronger and more broad reaching media focus on the recently relevant angles - job loss and business destruction - at this time of supposed "stimulus" activity.
    Larks

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  14. #14
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    Default Re: End of an era Port Adelaide

    I agree entirely Greg , except for the "unbelievable " part ,our local council was fired by of all people ,the NSW State government , even they found it rotten .

    Every state needs an ICAC ,preferably with even more power .
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
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    Default Re: End of an era Port Adelaide

    Quote Originally Posted by rufustr View Post



    BTW, this looks like the tail end of a H28 to me, any other ideas?
    Larks

    “It’s impossible”, said pride.
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    “Give it a try”, whispered the heart.

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    Default Re: End of an era Port Adelaide

    Thanks Larks, et al

    It's good to be here. As to my being able to take this to a higher level, I've done my best with some published articles and other activities.

    Anyone interested in an overview of the Port Adelaide/Newport Quays saga could look at a thread on Adelaide development forum Sensational Adelaide.

    That forum is generally pro-development, but it gives a fair run to critics of developments as well.

    A thread there on the Newport Quays development presently has almost 600 posts and over 40,000 views. I and others have been huffing and puffing about this development on the thread since 2005. If you care to wade through the thread you'll have a good picture of what's gone on:

    http://www.sensational-adelaide.com/...c.php?f=8&t=70

    My own background includes working in maritime heritage in Gloucester and London in the UK, Mystic Seaport, Connecticut in the US and in Adelaide. I'm lucky to have had a few careers, including one in property development, and I'm not a rabid, one-eyed heritage zealot, but rather a believer in balance and the retention of community memory through responsible conservation.

    I often wonder what the unborn generation will think of our stewardship of our assets.

    After all, none of us really owns anything - we are life tenants at best.

    I think that is the backside of an H28, by the way. (Edit: I've been corrected by my betters - that's no H28!)
    Last edited by stumpjumper; 05-29-2009 at 07:33 AM.

  17. #17
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    Default Re: End of an era Port Adelaide

    I too think the loss of the old port (much more than just Searles) is pretty tragic. And the residential development going in there is indeed reminscent of Qld development at its worst. Its not just the Rann government-this has been brewing for 20 or 30 years at least. How those business survived with no security of tenure for such a long time is itself a mystery and a credit to the tenacity of their proprietors. Stumper, all credit to you mate, but hasn't the horse well and truly bolted? I guess there are lessons to be learned and hopefully heads to roll, but sadly it won't bring the port back.
    Phil

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    Default Re: End of an era Port Adelaide


  19. #19
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    Default Re: End of an era Port Adelaide

    py, you're quite right, the horse bolted some time ago.

    However, the struggle over the redevelopment of Port Adelaide has been going on for several decades. The argument over the Jenkins Street boatyards is just an episode in a long saga.

    I believe that without such continuing resistance, which is coming from many quarters, there would be even less of the area's history accessible among the generic, non-specific poorly planned new construction around the Port.

    There's still a way to go at Port Adelaide, and as long as the powers that be are committed to the developers' line and ignore 'world best practice' in relation to the treatment of historic inner harbours, then it's worth continuing the protest.

    I'd recommend you take the time to read the Sensational Adelaide thread referenced in my last post.

    By the way, in the photo above (by the brilliant but mysterious Mangrove Rat) note the way the slots are lined up in the screws used to hold the hanging tools on the right. You don't get that with your Bunnings tool rack!
    Last edited by stumpjumper; 05-29-2009 at 01:21 AM.

  20. #20
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    Default Re: End of an era Port Adelaide

    I love looking around old sheds, you find all sorts of amazing things tucked away. I really don't understand this desire to knock down and modernize.
    be modest, and be proud of it.

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    Default Re: End of an era Port Adelaide

    I've just written to the Premier:

    Dear Mr Rann,

    I am utterly appalled to read that your government has forced the closure of this historic business for no other reason than to feed the greedy appetite of waterfront "development." Our society and our nation can ill-afford the loss of heritage such as this. Particularly such a living heritage that will be of continued benefit to traditional, non-polluting maritime activities such as the construction, maintenance and restoration of traditional water craft. Such vessels are in no way catered for in modern marina complexes and more often than not, shunned completely.

    Instead of forcing Searles Boat Yard to close your government should be doing its utmost to support and keep this historic yard open. To not do so, and instead force the yard's closure is, and I don't use this term lightly, UN-AUSTRALIAN!

    I strongly urge you to not only re-consider this rash and ill-considered act, but to reverse it completely and offer your government's support in preserving the last extant piece of maritime heritage Port Adelaide has to offer.

    Yours faithfully,

    Duncan Gibbs
    premier@dpc.sa.gov.au
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  22. #22
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    Default Re: End of an era Port Adelaide

    Traditional boat yards don't fund political parties Duncan.

  23. #23
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    Default Re: End of an era Port Adelaide

    Footy clubs do! Next stop Port Adelaide Football Club!!
    Jarndyce and Jarndyce

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  24. #24
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    Default Re: End of an era Port Adelaide

    Sku', a few years ago - 2002 - I met a fellow (John? Grenfell) involved in a campaign to preserve and expand on Port Philip Bay's marine heritage. I was looking around Pompei's in Mordialloc and Blunts in Williamstown which was for sale at the time. It seemed that the Vic' gov't was very supportive at the time, even to the point of considering some support for taking on Blunts yard. Is this still the case in Victoria? And is it perhaps a model that other states should be looking at?
    Larks

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  25. #25
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    Default Re: End of an era Port Adelaide

    Anyone wanting to take further their complaints about what has happened in Port Adelaide should look carefully at the structures and strategies used to control public responses.

    The following is from the latest issue of 'Compass' - the nautically-named newsletter from the Newport Quays developers which went to local residents, shops, cafes etc. That 'latest issue' is now 3 years old.

    http://www.newportquays.com.au/media...TTER%20No2.pdf

    Once the required planning and building approvals had been achieved, no further 'dialogue' with the community was required and the expensive newsletters stopped.

    Apart from lobbying and behind-the-scenes dealing, an overt mechanism used to control public perception was the Port Centre Coordination Group, funded by, comprising and representing three self-declared 'stakeholders': the government's Land Management Corporation; the Newport Quays Consortium and the Port Adelaide Enfield Council.

    Note that the local Council, which most closely represents the community of the three members of the Coordination Group, is outnumbered and is also probably the member with the least assets (money, manpower, time) to give to the work of the Coordination Group.

    There is no place in such a Coordination Group for direct representation of residents or businesses; they are supposed to be represented by the local council's representative.

    Nor is there is any place in the group for independent expertise - in tourism, urban design, architecture, business development, maritime operations, maritime archaeology and so on.

    Such considerations are meant to be input into the planning process at different levels by consultants, reviews, even the public servants themselves, but the declaration by the government of the Newport Quays development as a Major Project reduces the input of outside expertise and increases the power of the LMC and the developer in decisions.

    I have managed a similarly-named 'X X Coordination Group' in a large new development. That group involved the government as landowner, a wealthy private developer and the local council. I think I understand now not only how such a body works, but the reasons it is set up as it is.

    In my opinion, no local council should agree to be part of such a committee. To do so is to reduce their ability to represent the interest of their community and of local business, and other more effective means should be sought to represent those interests of in large scale development.

    In years gone by, developers tended to be local businesses, which not only had a financial stake in the success of the development, but stuck around, living every day with the results of their development and with the community it affected. There was less need for formal community involvement.

    But in these days of mobile national and international corporations becoming involved at the beginning of a development then moving on with their profit, it has become even more important for the community and local businesses to have effective representation in the whole process if the results are to be fully acceptable to the community.

    That the community is not always properly represented by their council and their government is lamentable and often creates a high risk of a bad outcome, in management jargon.

    Call me a socialist, but I’m sure that a community which has to live for a lifetime with the results of a development is not only a 'stakeholder' but should have a say in what happens, whether or not the site is publicly owned.

    While this high level of community involvement is widely accepted as an ideal situation, too often what looks like 'communication' between a developer and the community is primarily something else - a one-way flow of propaganda designed among other things to foil attempts to get up angry public meetings etc., and to a lesser extent a sales tool.

    Property confers many rights, as it should, but no private corporation should be able to put aside the interests of the community, and in aligning themselves with the development industry, all levels of government should remember that their first responsibility is to their constituents, no matter how seductive the life of the property developers seem to be, or how grandiose their designs.
    Last edited by stumpjumper; 05-30-2009 at 02:42 AM.

  26. #26
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    Default Re: End of an era Port Adelaide

    One of my to-dos on my last visit to Oz was to spend a day in Port Adelaide.
    The Maritime Museum there is very interesting and I don't quite understand why it hasn't been possible to integrate a WORKING boatyard into the concept, maybe in combination with handicraft (boat-related) outings for schools.

    Sad sad, :.-{(

    Gernot H.

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    Default Re: End of an era Port Adelaide

    The expansion of the existing Port Adelaide Nautical Museum into the South Australian Maritime Museum happened in 1986 during the well-funded (at first, anyway) premiership of John Bannon.

    The museum was moved from its cramped quarters in St Vincent Street to a former bond store in Lipson Street, in the heart of an area of historic warehouses and shipping offices. It was hoped that the extensive publicly-funded restoration work in the street would be a stimulus to further private efforts.

    Hoping wasn't enough, though, and apart from a rise in property prices and the renovation of some local pubs using poker machine income, not a lot happened. The question of tax breaks and other incentives for conservation is relevant here but is not the only issue.

    In South Australia, the funding and management of heritage is split clearly into two.

    Built heritage comes under the Department of Environment and Heritage, under the Minister for Environment and Conservation. The department is strongly focussed on the conservation of the natural environment, and built heritage exists on a relatively small budget.

    'Cultural heritage' - moveable objects but with some crossover to built heritage as in the restoration of Lipson Street in Port Adelaide comes under the lavishly funded Premier's Department. The minister responsible is the Premier, who is also Minister for the Arts, together with the Minister Assisting the Minister for the Arts.

    As a result, the Maritime Museum is maintained as a showpiece of heritage conservation and state of the art museum presentation, while the government's Land Management Corporation, virtually under the direct control of the Premier's Cabinet, lays waste to the heritage of the historic old port beyond Lipson Street.

    With respect to working museums:

    The Port Adelaide Maritime Museum has already said it does not want any artefacts from the just-ended 170 years of boatbuilding in Port Adelaide. It says it has no room, even in storage.

    Until recently, Port Adelaide had within walking distance the SA Maritime Museum, an aviation museum, a railway museum, a military vehicles museum and more vast, vacant wharf sheds and wool stores than you could count, as well as hundreds of metres of unused wharves.

    Not only did Port Adelaide have more physical potential as a working museum precinct than Mystic Seaport, but the existence nearby of the former Weapons Research Establishment and the newly built submarine and ship construction facilities make the area ideal for a museum of sea, land, air and space, one with as many working aspects as there is room for.

    South Australia's early role in nuclear weapon and space research through Woomera, its status as one of the last 'windjammer ports', the spacious and relatively intact physical infrastructure of the Victorian-era port, the dry climate and space available, the strong military presence in the state from RAAF Base Edinburgh to state of the art manufacturers make Port Adelaide an ideal location for such a development.

    There's certainly room, too. A working appreciation of the state's maritime and other heritages could be included in school curricula, and the expensive new maritime branch of the state's Technical and Further Education system whose buildings look across the river at the Jenkins Street boatyard demolitions could teach some hands-on seamanship and construction skills at its doorstep.

    The government could (but never will) have a look at the 2006 Commonwealth Government report entitled 'Traditional Wooden Boatbuilding and Maintenance in the New Millenium' which urged the states to preserve and promote the highly sustainable craft of timber boatbuilding. The Commonwealth supports the Wooden Boat Centre in Franklin, Tasmania, where people come from all over the world to learn the boatbuilder's art.

    The Commonwealth's report states:

    'In the last two centuries Australia has been a maritime nation with a legacy of various types
    of wooden boats, many of which are still in existence and date back to the 1880’s. If the his-
    torical and cultural significance of these boats is not recognised they may be lost forever.
    In Australia there is not enough done to promote our maritime cultural heritage to the broad
    base community.'


    Mr Rann's government, and its bulldozers, obviously beg to differ.

    Mr Rann's Infrastructure Minister, ruddy-faced Irishman Pat Conlon, certainly does:

    ‘I don’t believe that the historical value that they pretend exists in the boatyards is actually there.’

    It's odd that presentations of maritime history are sure winners all over the world, especially with well-heeled cultural tourists seeking authentic sights and experiences.

    Sadly, it seems that the Port's tourism and potential as a museum precinct may never be realised as land is sold off piecemeal for unexceptional, dormitory style housing, with no balancing tourism or retail/commercial development.

    The fact that the old port lies within the very safe seat of a deputy premier/treasurer who is a wannabe property developer of the most single-minded and ruthless stamp doesn't help much either.

    We can only hope that all voices are given a decent hearing in the future, although time's a wastin', as they say.
    Last edited by stumpjumper; 06-01-2009 at 03:51 PM.

  28. #28
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    6

    Default Re: End of an era Port Adelaide

    Well, I'm still here. I'm also still waiting for the Newport Quays development to use the land formerly occupied by Searles' Boatyard

    Building work at the Newport Quays development stopped years ago, and it's unlikely its further stages will ever be built. Premier Rann and his development minded ministers Pat Conlon and Kevin Foley have all left the stage and I suppose are enjoying their generous superannuations,

    Once again, the people of SA are the losers, with the poor old Port losing in this case as well.

  29. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    victoria, australia. (1 address now)
    Posts
    66,100

    Default Re: End of an era Port Adelaide

    Oh I'm sure they still got their 'commissions'.

  30. #30
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Mukilteo, WA
    Posts
    3,437

    Default Re: End of an era Port Adelaide

    In the meantime, Jensen's has succumbed in their battle here as well. I believe the boathouse is becoming another cafe. At least they didn't tear it all down.

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