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Thread: Lofting the Brewer catboat

  1. #6231
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Your posts always leave me feeling rather inferior Jim - but I have no problem with that, I am in awe!
    Larks

    “It’s impossible”, said pride.
    “It’s risky”, said experience.
    “It’s pointless”, said reason.
    “Give it a try”, whispered the heart.

    LPBC Beneficiary

    "Keep away from people who try to belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you, too, can become great!"

  2. #6232
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Canoeyawl View Post
    It is lovely Jim, don't cry.
    Not many will know what happened there and those that do will stop and knuckle their foreheads to the boatbuilding gods present before them.

    Ah, yes, Jake, what tales be told could only the dead speak.


    Quote Originally Posted by TerryLL View Post
    Seriously?
    You're already planning your next build???

    God, I am such a slouch.

    It'll be a smaller build, Terry, less ambitious. There'll still be the Winter months to fill.


    Quote Originally Posted by Gib Etheridge View Post
    Bloody outrageous Jim. Fantastic doesn't do it justice. Incredible comes closer.

    I would have thrown out the feeler gauge a long long time ago, in fact I did.

    Anyway, keep it up, we're all rooting for you (and I've got big money on you).

    Thanks, Gib, that's very kind. Is there any chance I could get in on some of that?


    Quote Originally Posted by Larks View Post
    Your posts always leave me feeling rather inferior Jim - but I have no problem with that, I am in awe!

    That's a tough compliment to swallow, Greg, but thanks.





    Well, it's all glued up, five pieces, five scarf joints. They came out okay; here's a couple.



  3. #6233
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    One sweet piece of work!
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

  4. #6234
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Wow!

    Jim, you may be underwhelmed, but that is a fine result.

    Kevin
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  5. #6235
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Super Jim super!
    You have conditioned us to expect the impossible, and usually exceed our expectations.
    Last edited by TerryLL; 05-14-2021 at 08:31 AM.

  6. #6236
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    "Came out OK"....

    I had to grab my trusty thesaurus and look up "Understatement" just one more time

  7. #6237
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Ledger View Post


    Well, it's all glued up, five pieces, five scarf joints. They came out okay; here's a couple.


    what a milestone, glad I tuned in! A tour de force, Mobius strip ain't in it.

  8. #6238
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Ledger View Post
    ... and the other thing is that it will be easy to sand and varnish. There'll be no corners where the finish can crack.
    Bears repeating.
    What color are their hands now?

  9. #6239
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Thanks, all, for the kind compliments. This is an exciting part of the project, much anticipated and finally happening. It's good to be able to share it.

    As expected, no sooner was the last clamp off, a batten got clamped in place, which led to another and another. The plan is to batten off the minimum possible to get a fair sweep all around, keeping both sides fairly close to each other Then some work with the electric plane to remove most of the waste above the line.

    Below you can see a thin batten clamped around the aft corner; this is to draw the transition line between the side sweep and the athwartship line. You can see I'll be knocking off a quarter inch in spots and nothing elsewhere. This rough fairing really brings things into focus. As things are, I'm close to the finished line, there's not a lot left to play with after trimming the bottoms.



  10. #6240
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Amazing. Like you're building a great big cello! I know it will make some beautiful sounds.

  11. #6241
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Just Plain Beautiful

    So the next step is the cabin top, yes? That oughta be fun? Challenging?
    spending most of my time on the water, in winter it just takes a different form

  12. #6242
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    "Little by little a little becomes a lot." Tanzanian proverb.

    Nice work Jim.

  13. #6243
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Somehow I lost track on this build and have now caught up, great way to spend a morning. Thanks Jim

  14. #6244
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Absolutely stunning Jim. I can only begin to imagine the fitting of that coaming lifting it an’ all. Bravo

  15. #6245
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Thank you all for the kind comments, it's been a bit of a slog fitting the cabin sides and quite a relief that it went without a hitch.



    There was another little job that's been keeping me awake at night for the past few years, cutting a near-perfect round hole through the cabin front for this juicy little porthole that I found on Ebay. No sooner did the opportunity present itself than the hole was cut, and by fair means or foul it came pretty close.







    This is one of the main features of the forward deck landscape. A catboat needs at least one forward looking port, for looks if nothing else. Sea Rover had two tiny ports that gave the boat a lot of it's personality. Here I've opted for the cyclops approach, and I think when all is put together it will work well.



  16. #6246
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Nice touch with the porthole there Jim, it will create a nice bit of airflow on those hot summer days too.

    Cheers,
    Mike.

  17. #6247
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    I'd be nervous as hell cutting that hole! Nice work.
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

  18. #6248
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Those jobs where you can't see both sides and all calculation is suspect, I call Pigs in Space. You just have to go for it.

  19. #6249
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    Default

    Oh, yeah!




    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  20. #6250
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Speaking of racking stud walls into plumb : I was taught the inverse of that technique for pulling exterior walls in on the second story . One end of a SPF 16 foot 2by4 was nailed flat to the edge of the top plate with a pair of carefully placed 16d nails . The other end was similarly nailed to a block on the subfloor ,which was in turn nailed to a pair of the joists below . Like a brace might be be set up . A measurement was taken from the bottom plate out perpendicular to the 2by 4 and a strut cut about 2 1/2 inches longer than that measurement, maybe a bit longer ,depending on how much pulling you had to do . I can't remember that exact dimension .

    One end of the strut was then set where the floor met the bottom plate and the other end placed under the upper half of the long board . Pounding with a frameing hammer brought the strut closer to perpendicular to the long board with each blow , bending it like the drawing of an immense bow .In came the top plate . When the wall was plumb a nail was sent through the bow into the end of the strut . Then ceiling joists were installed to hold what had been gained . If you couldn't quite get there with the framing hammer you'd switch to a 3 pounder for the final blows ; this with everyone else cleared out . Comeing up normal to the maaximum bend all of it felt ready to explode or carry away : a perilous thing of beauty .
    Last edited by Bill Perkins; 05-17-2021 at 10:07 PM.

  21. #6251
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    A symphony of craftsmanship. It is a joy to watch it come together.
    Tom

  22. #6252
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Ledger View Post
    Thank you all for the kind comments, it's been a bit of a slog fitting the cabin sides and quite a relief that it went without a hitch.



    There was another little job that's been keeping me awake at night for the past few years, cutting a near-perfect round hole through the cabin front for this juicy little porthole that I found on Ebay. No sooner did the opportunity present itself than the hole was cut, and by fair means or foul it came pretty close.







    This is one of the main features of the forward deck landscape. A catboat needs at least one forward looking port, for looks if nothing else. Sea Rover had two tiny ports that gave the boat a lot of it's personality. Here I've opted for the cyclops approach, and I think when all is put together it will work well.


    Is that area flat, or did you have to modify the mating surfaces, somehow? Of the coaming and porthole, I mean.

    I think the cycloptic vibe is cool!

  23. #6253
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    So you put a round disc in the center then went around it with a round based router?

    How did you adapt the (supposedly) flat base of the light to the radiused coaming?

    After sealing the end grain with epoxy (?) are you planning to fill whatever gap there is with a caulk?

  24. #6254
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by amish rob View Post
    Is that area flat, or did you have to modify the mating surfaces, somehow? Of the coaming and porthole, I mean.

    I think the cycloptic vibe is cool!

    Quote Originally Posted by Gib Etheridge View Post
    So you put a round disc in the center then went around it with a round based router?

    How did you adapt the (supposedly) flat base of the light to the radiused coaming?

    After sealing the end grain with epoxy (?) are you planning to fill whatever gap there is with a caulk?


    These are good points and I've wasted a few good hours going over them in my mind long before the actual cutting began. As things stand I should have gone over them some more because no sooner was the cut was made than better ideas sprang forth. You can put that on my headstone.


    The flange of the porthole is one eighth of an inch thick. It touches the cabin side at the nine and three o'clock position. In the center there's a quarter inch gap due to the curvature of the side. The plan is to let the flange in to the cabin side until the outermost edges are flush and the fill the remaining space with black goop.


    The hole itself will be well sealed and the spigot of the porthole will be bedded in black goop. There is not much of a gap to fill, it's a nice close fit.


    How was the hole cut? Well, I'm glad you asked. The short answer is with a router, but it's the details that make it work. The porthole spigot is four and a quarter inches in diameter. I have a four and a half inch hole saw and I used that in a drill press to cut a hole in a piece of half inch ply, for a pattern. Now, theoretically, if I put a quarter inch straight bit in a router and a half inch collar it should cut an eight inch smaller than the pattern hole, giving me four and a quarter inches. However, after routing a test hole using the router and pattern I found that the fit on the porthole was too loose. My solution was to wrap the collar with electrical tape, which increases the diameter of the collar, increasing the offset, to cut a smaller hole. The next test made a hole that was too small. By removing the tape one wind at a time a good fit was obtained after a half dozen tries.

    Once the correct diameter was obtained the pattern with the hole was clamped and nailed into place, on the inside, and the hole cut. Actually, it wasn't as simple as that. The quarter inch bit would only reach so far, so a lot of the waste was removed with a holes saw. The remaining waste was removed with a big top-bearing bit riding on the shoulder created by the small bit.

    The old-timers would have drilled a circle of small holes and finished with a rasp and sandpaper. But wait till you see my rig for cutting the rabbeted elliptical holes for the fixed lights. It's still in R+D otherwise I show ya.

    Jim

  25. #6255
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Perkins View Post
    Speaking of racking stud walls into plumb : I was taught the inverse of that technique for pulling exterior walls in on the second story . One end of a SPF 16 foot 2by4 was nailed flat to the edge of the top plate with a pair of carefully placed 16d nails . The other end was similarly nailed to a block on the subfloor ,which was in turn nailed to a pair of the joists below . Like a brace might be be set up . A measurement was taken from the bottom plate out perpendicular to the 2by 4 and a strut cut about 2 1/2 inches longer than that measurement, maybe a bit longer ,depending on how much pulling you had to do . I can't remember that exact dimension .

    One end of the strut was then set where the floor met the bottom plate and the other end placed under the upper half of the long board . Pounding with a frameing hammer brought the strut closer to perpendicular to the long board with each blow , bending it like the drawing of an immense bow .In came the top plate . When the wall was plumb a nail was sent through the bow into the end of the strut . Then ceiling joists were installed to hold what had been gained . If you couldn't quite get there with the framing hammer you'd switch to a 3 pounder for the final blows ; this with everyone else cleared out . Comeing up normal to the maaximum bend all of it felt ready to explode or carry away : a perilous thing of beauty .

    Thank you, Bill. This might come in handy someday. It's a nice twist to the old trick.



    Once the cabin sides are in place I can glue the face frames of the two lockers in place. It's good to have them off the floor after all these years, they do get underfoot. And because they are in I can install the dorade boxes, remember them? They have been in the way as well, taking up valuable bench real estate. And along with the dorade boxes come the ventilators, which up till now have been used as fancy pencil holders.

    So, here are all the ventilator parts in various stages of completion. The ventilator bases have had a slight rabbet turned on their lower end to accept the copper tubes. The tubes were then soldered in place. Two collars of some unidentified wood are being made to compensate for the angle of the deck in the area.



  26. #6256
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Many continued thanks for sharing your build, Jim. It's like receiving a present every time one opens the thread.

  27. #6257
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Thanks, Wiley, thanks for stopping in.




    Here are the ventilators fitted to the deck. The copper tubes on each one lead down into the dorade boxes underneath. The bottom of the tubes will be cut about an inch above the dorade box floor.




  28. #6258
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Ledger View Post
    Thanks, Wiley, thanks for stopping in.




    Here are the ventilators fitted to the deck. The copper tubes on each one lead down into the dorade boxes underneath. The bottom of the tubes will be cut about an inch above the dorade box floor.



    Nice.
    Remind me p;ease, as I don't want to plough through 6000 posts looking for the drawing, does the Dorado box have an internal baffle?
    If it does, you may be able to cut at higher than an inch, to allow more air flow.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
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  29. #6259
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    I don't understand a below deck Dorade box at all.

  30. #6260
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    Nice.
    Remind me p;ease, as I don't want to plough through 6000 posts looking for the drawing, does the Dorado box have an internal baffle?
    If it does, you may be able to cut at higher than an inch, to allow more air flow.

    Quote Originally Posted by Thad View Post
    I don't understand a below deck Dorade box at all.

    Here are the dorade boxes as I was making them. Just imagine end pieces and a top on the lower section. They are situated in the lockers up under the deck. The copper tubes from the ventilators enter the box directly above the thru-hull fittings. The breeze will move along the box to the higher section, which will have a vent leading directly into the cabin. Any water will exit through the thru-hulls into a hose whose discharge terminus location has yet to be determined.



  31. #6261
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Any way those tubes could be lead to the CB case above the waterline?
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

  32. #6262
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    For the small amount of water likely to come in a vent (try not to bury the bow) you might just lead them into the bilge and let the pump empty it.

  33. #6263
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    So, you need a pair of decoratively hitched and painted bottles or jars of some kind, to hang just below the drains?

  34. #6264
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    We have ventilators on our foredeck with below deck "Dorade boxes". They drain directly through the topsides with a hole small enough that it is never noticed. The vent drains connect to foredeck gutter drains before going overboard. The plans don't show the baffle. I replace the vents with deck plates when we're offshore.





  35. #6265
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Jones View Post
    Any way those tubes could be lead to the CB case above the waterline?

    As much as I'd like to, Rich, there would be too many turns in the pipe.


    Quote Originally Posted by johngsandusky View Post
    For the small amount of water likely to come in a vent (try not to bury the bow) you might just lead them into the bilge and let the pump empty it.

    I agree, John, there's not going to be too much water coming in at once. However, I don't want to intentionally introduce fresh water into the bilge after making much effort to keep it out.


    Quote Originally Posted by amish rob View Post
    So, you need a pair of decoratively hitched and painted bottles or jars of some kind, to hang just below the drains?

    That would work too!


    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Lesser View Post
    We have ventilators on our foredeck with below deck "Dorade boxes". They drain directly through the topsides with a hole small enough that it is never noticed. The vent drains connect to foredeck gutter drains before going overboard. The plans don't show the baffle. I replace the vents with deck plates when we're offshore.
    Thanks, Dave, I like your arrangement. The simplest thing to do is to run two hoses down to a couple of thru-hulls in the boot top.






    Sharp eyes might have noticed from a previous photo that the new porthole wasn't centered on the seam in the Mahogany, Apparently, the inner and outer seams didn't quite coincide despite great efforts to make sure they would. I could not look at it, I had to turn my head away. It made me ashamed. The absolute symmetry of the forward deck was spoiled .

    The solution is to make a feature out of a fix. Here is the seam routed out to three quarters of an inch. A Wenge strip will be inlaid as a contrasting feature. The strip will stand proud of the surface and have a rabbet on each side that enfolds the edge of the Mahogany. The edges and face of the strip will be softly rounded to make a nice detail that will work well with the porthole itself.

    Another thing here. I've noticed that the top edge of the cabin has a couple of shoulders, you can see it in the photo. What I mean is is that the center height of the cabin front is good, and the sweep of the sides is good as well, but the transition between the two is too high. The sweet line lies a little lower. Once you see it you can't unsee it, the eye goes straight to it every time. Luckily, this is how it's supposed to work, having material left to remove and not the other way around.

    Oh, yeah, almost forgot, the cabin sides are lifted in order to prepare the surfaces for bonding.


    Last edited by Jim Ledger; 05-22-2021 at 08:57 AM.

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