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Thread: how to find plans for 1950's Int 14 racing dingy

  1. #1
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    Default how to find plans for 1950's Int 14 racing dingy

    i am wondering if there is a way to find plans for a 1950 - International 14 Racing Dinghy.



    i saw the boat on the web and there is a post in the archives and thought of a "less tender" version for fun.



    i'm really wondering if there were set plans for International 14 dingy's at the time and i they would be available to buy from someone.



    or do these sort of plans and designs just fade away with time?

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    Quote Originally Posted by ewan View Post
    i am wondering if there is a way to find plans for a 1950 - International 14 Racing Dinghy.



    i saw the boat on the web and there is a post in the archives and thought of a "less tender" version for fun.



    i'm really wondering if there were set plans for International 14 dingy's at the time and i they would be available to buy from someone.



    or do these sort of plans and designs just fade away with time?
    Who is designer?
    save a nose, pick a banjo

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    "The enemies of reason have a certain blind look."
    Doctor Jacquin to Lieutenant D'Hubert, in Ridley Scott's first major film _The Duellists_.

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    Thorne,
    How did you post that animation?
    Here a designer name, Jack Holt
    Last edited by boylesboats; 02-06-2007 at 01:26 AM.
    save a nose, pick a banjo

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    They were/are a development class, so there are many designers. Plans may be available through the association. As Larry says, Jack holt designed some, Uffa Fox (there may be "study" plans in one of his books). His "Albacore" class was a detuned 1950's 14, still pretty wild. Your own Frank bethwaite may fill the bill. What are you going to build it in. Clinker or Cold Moulded. ?

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    thanks for the replies.
    thorne such an obvious search - i feel sheepish not starting there.

    the boat we fancy (its to be a joint project with my father) or inspired us can be found here.. http://www.woodwindyachts.com/sailboats/inter.htm
    it's lapstrake consruction which is a technique that dad has 1 projects worth of experience with (evening course in NZ). tboat also fit our criteria of being wooden, classic/non-modern in looks, and a fair wing 'speedster' for recreational sailing not competition. so if we found those plans then the amount of sail might be reduced.

    anyway i shall investigate the other sites further to see how we go - there's always another looker out there if we can't find anything.

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    hmm can't see an edit button to fix mistakes sorry

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    Right click on the sites animated giff, go to properties and copy the URL. Paste it somewhere where you can see it (lordy do I like dual monitors) and then do the postcard thing on this forum, typing in the address (Exactly...with caps and everything) into the dialog box.

    Steve
    Last edited by Lewisboats; 02-06-2007 at 08:18 AM.

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    The boat you listed is a tough build and pre dates the "Albacore" like 14's. You might want to try building in glued lapstrake. Do a search under "Oughtred" on this forum and you'll find lots of Glued plywood clinker (lapstrake in America) boats. You'll need to increase the sail area to fet the same type of performance, maybe contact Oughtred directly, because he likes performance boats.

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    Most folks building wooden boats start with something a bit simpler -- and easier to build!

    ;0 )

    Some issues you may encounter are that the current class boats are made from composite materials, and trying to 'retro-fit' these out of wood may result in some spectacular breakages.

    Unless you plan on actively racing your boat, many of the modern designers have 'go-fast' models with plans and support that should meet your needs -- and be much easier to build from modern wood materials.
    "The enemies of reason have a certain blind look."
    Doctor Jacquin to Lieutenant D'Hubert, in Ridley Scott's first major film _The Duellists_.

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    The DN Goodchild web site has plans for a plywood version iirc.

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    Does this meet your criteria? It's in Svensons.com, by William Jackson. It's definitely a 50's thing, with plywood over frame.

    http://www.svensons.com/boat/?p=SailBoats/Zephyr



    Last edited by WillW; 02-06-2007 at 12:44 PM.

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    Gareth- I'd agree that the boat shown would be a most ambitious build.
    I recollect that there the GP-14's were intended for home builders, patterned after the International 14's of the time and fairly close to them in performance. Does that sound right? I think it was a Jack Holt design.

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    you guys have to be kidding me. That is an ambitious build?

    Have you never riveted a cedar plank? Gues what... It's not hard, and in many ways it is easier than gued up ply.

    For one It's quicker.
    It is much less temperature and humidity dependent.
    Its cheaper.
    It's worth more.
    It's easier to fix.

    Can I go on?

    I taught intro to boatbuilding classes for years and used a clinker cedar on oak dinghy as a basic project because they are easy.



    I don't mean to be at all offensive.
    I just find clinker solid planking to be the easiest way I have found to build a boat.

    -Thad
    Last edited by Thad Van Gilder; 02-06-2007 at 04:18 PM.
    There is a joy in madness, that only mad men know. -Nieztsche

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    Take a look at uffafox.com. You can get plans for many of Uffa's designs there. Lot's of cool old plans available there, dinghy and keelboat.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hwyl View Post
    The boat you listed is a tough build and pre dates the "Albacore" like 14's. You might want to try building in glued lapstrake. Do a search under "Oughtred" on this forum and you'll find lots of Glued plywood clinker (lapstrake in America) boats. You'll need to increase the sail area to fet the same type of performance, maybe contact Oughtred directly, because he likes performance boats.
    Iain Oughtred also does a very good book with lots of pics and details on how to do "it".

    Manual of Clinker Boatbuilding
    Iain Oughtred.

    Some of his clinker dinghies also have a bit of a early international 14 feel in terms of appearance - but the plans are hugely detailed and have been built by many first time builders.

    They are also lighter so probably have a better performance and durability because of the glued lap construction.

    MIK

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    Back in the early 1960's my Dad considered a GP-14 as a father/sons building project. We settled on another Holt design, the Enterprise. The GP-14 was a much lower peformance boat than a Int. 14, closer to the Blue Jay type of design.

    As mentioned above the Int.14 was a developement class, 14' loa, beam between a min/max dimensions, 140 or so sq. ft. sail area., anything else was up to you. IIRC, the Thistle was an enlarged Int. 14 hull design.

    A friend had a Jet 14 back in the 60's which was a Int. 14 hull with a smaller rig off of a Snipe, made a nice little boat.
    http://sailingsource.com/jet14/

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    Ewan- If you cannot get plans for the Uffa Fox versions of the 14 via the website there is much info, history and lines in several of his books-'Thoughts onYachts and Yachting' , 'Sailing Seamanship and Yacht Construction, and 'The Best of Uffa' Since your father has take a building course it seems a great way to go to do a project together. Since no Vintage 14 class exists and it is a loose rule anyway it seems to me that enlarging lines from the book at the print shop is completly adequate for deriving an offset table to loft from-just hit the length and beam markers for the rule and you have a 14. I believe from my reading in the Fox books that the beam ia a max 4'-9" and OAL 14' exact. He shows lines for 'Avenger'-his breakthrough planing Dinghy 14-but not exact specs, but also lines sail and construc profile for 'Thunder and Lightning' - a later 14 of his and lists 13'-11.75" x 4'-8.25"beam. The difference in the boats is Avenger has plumb topsides forward-no flare at all-leading aft into fairly pronounced tumbelhome at the transom, whereas T&L begins to trend toward some flare forward and tiny t'home aft.
    You might also consider his Northfolk Class at 16' x5'4"-the 'Lively' plans sold by WoodenBoat store. It has a wider transom relative to beam and an offset table, could be reduced to 14' on 10.5" stations if you want the 14 footer. The building difference in time and material negligable-especially time- and a monster rig and SA horsepower. Trap boat for sure. They sailed the Northfolk with 2 crew hanging off the gunwales and helmsman as far as possible on the rail. Even today with a large single crew on the wire it is a lot of boat. It carries 90-100# of lead on a deep and effiecient C/B with a winch lift so it is a ballasted C/B'er.
    You should be able to find one of these books-maybe at a sail club,yacht club-or boat sailer folks, local Library/Library system. I bought my copies on Amazon.
    Good Luck to you-Hope you build a Uffa boat- I think the guy is amazing indeed, as is Holt, and all of that era.
    John

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    I'll add that the 14 and 16' lively would be easily adapted to glued lapstrake with frames and very beautiful in the that. Since your dad has the school experience he must have the contacts to help adapting- seems a piece of cake given your situation. And Ian Oughtreds Clinker Plywood Boatbuilding books is an up to date source for the how-tos of the method.

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    I owned a GP 14. I would not recommend them, they're heavy and slow by I 14 standards.

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    thanks all for the replies - we've looked at a few suggestions and had to take a few deep breaths as it became a bit too easy to say 'well it's not too much bigger'.
    dad's keen on the fox idea and the 11'6" 'squall' has caught his eye- i'd go with the classic 'avenger' so we'll see . the first step were taking is buying one of his books. thanks again..

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    This boat is not actually a Fox / British style International 14. There was a 14 foot dinghy class in Toronto which was lapstrake. Came out of the Royal Canadian Yacht Club starting around 1897, built by the Ackroyd Brothers in Toronto. Claims that 3000 were built. A separate development from the Fox style boats in the UK. The lapstrake planking and the decks are an immediate give away as the British boats had neither. Discussions of the types started in 1930, and resulted in a trials that had American, British and Canadian styles together in 1933. After more races, the British type of sloop prevailed with their planing hulls and spinnakers. John Summers up at the Antique Boat Museum may know where there are plans as for a while he was curator of a museum in Toronto.

    If you look at the web site that you referenced you will see other Ackroyd dinghies. I think the site owner did not describe the boat correctly.
    Last edited by Ben Fuller; 02-10-2007 at 04:52 PM. Reason: Additional information
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    Fox designed a 14 footer called the Redwing that was pretty close to an International 14, lapstrake planked. Orignally they had a 132 lb. metal centerboard, but they switched to a lighter wood one and added a trapeze to get back the stability. As currently raced, they are about what you're looking for.

    Here's the Fox website: http://www.uffafox.com/plans.htm

    Here's the Redwing Dinghy site: http://www.geocities.com/nationalredwing/

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    Default Re: how to find plans for 1950's Int 14 racing dingy

    Quote Originally Posted by WillW View Post
    Does this meet your criteria? It's in Svensons.com, by William Jackson. It's definitely a 50's thing, with plywood over frame.

    http://www.svensons.com/boat/?p=SailBoats/Zephyr
    I'm currently attempting this design as my first boat. So far I have the frames complete and am about to mount them on the building form. A word of warning, working from the free plans found at svenson's calls for a certain level of creativity. For example, there is an entire figure missing from the plans and theres certain construction details, like the stem and keel, that aren't shown or described. Hopefully I can figure it out.

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    Default Re: how to find plans for 1950's Int 14 racing dingy

    Hunter,

    You've dragged up a pretty old thread that has a headline that doesn't really pose your question.

    Start a new thread and give it a more appropriate title. You'll get much better response.

    Welcome to the forum!
    Schooner sailors love to get blown offshore!

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    Default Re: how to find plans for 1950's Int 14 racing dingy

    Thanks for this information. I have an Ackroyd and I am looking for any technical / historical information about it.
    I already had a contact with Ken from Wood Wind Yacht but due to the covid situation I am not able to visit him (I am from Montreal and he is located in Toronto Area)

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