Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 123 ... LastLast
Results 36 to 70 of 107

Thread: School me on my boat!

  1. #36
    Join Date
    Jun 2021
    Location
    Portland, OR USA
    Posts
    35

    Default Re: School me on my boat!

    Quote Originally Posted by Garret View Post
    I had a 19' Chris Craft with a 283 in it. I can't believe you boat weighs more. I painted what I could on the trailer, then put a strap under the stern (3" wide ratchet strap) & lifted it with the bucket on my tractor. Painted the bare spots, then did the same on the bow. Bottom paint dries quickly - an hour or two should do.
    Haha thanks! You seem to think everyone has a tractor at home! ��

  2. #37
    Join Date
    Jun 2021
    Location
    Portland, OR USA
    Posts
    35

    Default Re: School me on my boat!

    Quote Originally Posted by Todd Bradshaw View Post
    Depending on the antifouling paint used, they may want you to do enough sanding to just knock the gloss down on the existing enamel. Just read the labels carefully with whatever paint you're thinking of using. Some contain strong solvents that will attack enamel. Others, like some of the water-based versions, are no more difficult to handle than the latex you might paint a wall in your house with. Given the option, I usually go for water-based ablatives like Hydrocoat. They will withstand long periods out of the water if needed without going dead and they slowly remove themselves as they age - so that you don't ever end up out there under a boat grinding off old dead bottom paint (which is one of the absolute worst and most unpleasant jobs in all of boatwork). And do check around to see what brands/types your neighbors fine effective in your area.

    p.s. if anybody starts talking about epoxy coating your boat over paint, walk away quickly. They don't know what they're talking about. Epoxy resin is great stuff, but one of the most important things to know about using it is knowing when not to use it.
    That sounds like good advice.

  3. #38
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    St. Helens, Oregon
    Posts
    3,243

    Default Re: School me on my boat!

    Talk to Steve at the West Basin Boatyard. I know they allow customers to work in their boats there. Once you have a good idea of what bottom paint you want to use, contact the customer support for that company and ask them about what it's safe to paint over. Most of them are very helpful. At the very least I'd rough it up a bit with sandpaper or Scotchbrite, but I'd go with whatever the manufacturer recommends.

    P.S. What Todd said about epoxy over paint is right on the money. Epoxy bonds well with wood. If you put it over paint it's depending on the paint bond for adhesion and will ultimately come off in sheets as the paint bond fails. Don't ask me how I know this

  4. #39
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Hills of Vermont, USA
    Posts
    40,402

    Default Re: School me on my boat!

    Quote Originally Posted by Moon Dance View Post
    Haha thanks! You seem to think everyone has a tractor at home! ��
    No - I realize many don't, but there are other option, a tripod & hoist for example.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  5. #40
    Join Date
    Jun 2021
    Location
    new york
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: School me on my boat!

    Your boat designed super cool and attractive!

    Very useful responses are here.

  6. #41
    Join Date
    Jun 2021
    Location
    Portland, OR USA
    Posts
    35

    Default Re: School me on my boat!

    Quote Originally Posted by Ahena910 View Post
    Your boat designed super cool and attractive!

    Very useful responses are here.
    Thanks!

    Can someone let me know how this antifouling paint is applied? One shop can get me in this week. They told me they'd drop the boat in the water and mark a water line and then only paint at that line and below. I was assuming they would go over the blue area with blue antifouling paint but they said only below the water line. I'd prefer not to have two different shades of blue but I suppose it wouldn't be seen unless it's on a trailer.

    Does this sound right?

  7. #42
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Madison Wisconsin
    Posts
    10,195

    Default Re: School me on my boat!

    It can be done that way. Our trimaran had white sides up top, but the lower half was black enamel. I used black bottom paint below the waterline, but left the band about 10" wide of the black enamel above the waterline because bottom paint often is rather dull looking and not so pretty. You have enough nice blue enamel above the waterline that the best looking solution might well be just adding bottom paint below the waterline.

  8. #43
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    4,951

    Default Re: School me on my boat!

    Paint scheme is a personal choice so I'd say do what makes you happy there, but a couple of comments that might help you decide:

    1. Bottom paint is not going to have the same level of gloss as the paint you have now. I would not want to run it up to cover the entire blue area.

    2. I think that boat deserves a painted boot stripe, not just a simple border between the bottom and topside colors.

    If it were me, I would have the shop mark the waterline, paint the bottom to that line in whatever color you like (I'm partial to red but I'm a traditionalist) and then extend the white topside paint down at the bow to create a blue boot stripe. Like this (well, this one is green not blue and it's a bit larger boat, but just to get the idea):



    That's a little trickier to paint than what you have now since the white needs to cross the laps rather than having the paint boundary follow a strake but a decent painter should have no trouble with it.
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  9. #44
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Hills of Vermont, USA
    Posts
    40,402

    Default Re: School me on my boat!

    Bottom paint can be brushed or rolled. I usually roll, as it's faster for me (& holding a brush upside down gets messy in a big hurry!).

    As said - bottom paint ain't pretty - it's purely to keep critters & slime from attaching to the boat.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  10. #45
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Madison Wisconsin
    Posts
    10,195

    Default Re: School me on my boat!

    Up close and personal this red is fairly typical of a lot of bottom paints. Not a very elegant finish, but it's there to do an important job and cosmetics are down the road a bit in terms of importance.

    nordica.jpg

  11. #46
    Join Date
    Jun 2021
    Location
    Portland, OR USA
    Posts
    35

    Default Re: School me on my boat!

    Cool thanks for the replies and pics! Now I get why boats are painted that way. I have often wondered why people paint their boats like this and now I know why. I've only trailered a 16 ft boat before.

    Is the antifouling paint really only good for 6-12 months? I really don't want to be doing this that frequently. I've googled the copper coat. Is the one branded Copper Coat the one to get? Pretty pricey. Is the old say, you get what you pay for, true in this case? Is there another brand that is maybe available at West Marine that's good to use?

  12. #47
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Southern Maine
    Posts
    21,759

    Default Re: School me on my boat!

    Copper Coat is different than ablative paint. It's apparently difficult to apply correctly. Take the preceding advice and find out what others use. At the very least it is a good chance to talk to other owners and you may find a mentor or two.

  13. #48
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Madison Wisconsin
    Posts
    10,195

    Default Re: School me on my boat!

    They're all pretty pricey. I've used three different types of antifouling paint over the years. The first was a hard modified epoxy antifouling paint which is what came on our trimaran. It was durable for trailering, and didn't lose its antifouling capabilities when out of the water between sailing seasons. But over a couple of seasons, you could see it start to lose its effectiveness as the copper content slowly leached out of it. So you add more paint on top of it. After a couple of these cycles though, there is an awful lot of dead, rather coarse and lumpy old epoxy paint base on your hull. Eventually you refuse to contribute even more to it and you go about the totally miserable task of working under the boat for days, sanding all that crap off - a truly horrible job, no matter how much safety gear you have on. A couple years later, you would occasionally swear that you can still taste that stuff.

    Next I tried a vinyl antifouling paint. It is thin and slick - should be good for speed, right? Unfortunately for us, we were moored in a bay with only waist deep water. That was fine for the shallow draft of the boat, but that warm shallow water was also great for weeds, slime and any other form of yuck that can grow on a boat. The vinyl paint just couldn't keep up. The bad news was that no other paint was going to stick to the vinyl paint. The good news is that at least it was thin and easier to sand off than the epoxy paint had been - but it did all need to come off.

    This is usually where the folks who live on the coasts start telling up that us fresh water people don't need antifouling paint. In reality, if you leave your boat all summer in a typical midwestern lake with no bottom paint it will grow a layer of green fur about 3/4" long by August, and if you don't blast it off within a few days of pulling the boat out of the water, it sets like concrete.

    So, having sanded bottom paint for the absolute last time ever, I decided to try an ablative paint. They slowly wear away with age as they do their work. The water-based brand that I use (Hydrocoat) is without nasty solvents or awful fumes and rolls on easily. It's tough enough to trailer and doesn't lose its antifouling power when the boat spends long winters out of the water (not the case with all bottom paints). At the beginning of the season you look over the boat for thin spots and touch them up, and then every couple of years you add a full refresher coat. Some people even use two colors for two initial coats, like a final coat of red over a coat of blue. If you start to see blue showing, you know it's time for a new coat of red. In our area, it has worked well. We will normally pull a boat over into the shallows, mid-summer and scrub it down if we're getting some slime, but that's about it until we get to the fall clean-up, which is a bit more serious, but not really bad. No sanding involved and no buildup of old dead paint present - ever.

    The key is still to do what you can to find out what has been working well in your area on boats similar to your boat. The contents of different paint brands vary quite a bit, and so does the variety of what sort of stuff grows on boats in any given area. Some brands and types are likely to work better than others in your particular location.

  14. #49
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Central Coast, Ca
    Posts
    31,398

    Default Re: School me on my boat!

    You are about to get schooled on taping off the waterline on a lapstrake boat!
    Hopefully it was done correctly before because it is a fussy job to get it right. A bunch of standing on your head taping off little backwards triangles in just the right places so that it appears as a continuous (slightly sheered) line when viewed from the dock or from another boat.

    This stolen image is not perfect but hinting at the correct way to do it.

    95FE0FFE-AB2F-4C55-BAB9-83FD8D5AF640.jpeg

  15. #50
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Madison Wisconsin
    Posts
    10,195

    Default Re: School me on my boat!

    It would be nice to know more about the characteristics of the blue enamel. An awful lot of the popular marine enamels come with a warning stating not to use them for extended periods of immersion below the water line. They can work fine for day-sailing and brief outings, but when left in the water for longer periods they can sometimes peel like crazy. Top-coating them with bottom paint may not be waterproof enough to prevent this, in which case your enamel might peel and take your expensive bottom paint with it. The bond of any coating system is only as strong as its weakest link. This is the same reason we don't apply epoxy resin over paint. Normally epoxy resin bonds extremely well. However, if it is applied on top of paint, its bond strength is reduced to just that of the paint.

  16. #51
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    4,951

    Default Re: School me on my boat!

    Quote Originally Posted by Todd Bradshaw View Post
    It would be nice to know more about the characteristics of the blue enamel. An awful lot of the popular marine enamels come with a warning stating not to use them for extended periods of immersion below the water line. They can work fine for day-sailing and brief outings, but when left in the water for longer periods they can sometimes peel like crazy. Top-coating them with bottom paint may not be waterproof enough to prevent this, in which case your enamel might peel and take your expensive bottom paint with it. The bond of any coating system is only as strong as its weakest link. This is the same reason we don't apply epoxy resin over paint. Normally epoxy resin bonds extremely well. However, if it is applied on top of paint, its bond strength is reduced to just that of the paint.
    That's a good call Todd. From the Rodda paint spec for that product...

    This high quality, moderately fast drying acrylic enamel system provides a range of gloss options with excellent impact resistance and weatherability.
    Topcoat is available in a wide range of stock and custom colors. Not recommended for immersion service or high corrosion areas.
    So it might be better to remove it first.
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  17. #52
    Join Date
    Jun 2021
    Location
    Portland, OR USA
    Posts
    35

    Default Re: School me on my boat!

    Shoot, this is bad news! I hope this isn't the start of a money pit. I was originally looking at aluminum boats because they are so easy. I came across this one and instantly fell in love. But, aluminum boats are boring and nowhere as pretty as this boat.

    Looks like $1500 before I even bring it home (slip). The purchase price was already at the very top end of my budget (after bumping my budget up twice LOL). If you guys owned this boat what would you do? Is sanding it off and applying the antifouling paint the only real option? Do you sand off just up to the water line?

    Does "not recommended for immersion service" mean not to be used in the water at all or not to be kept in water? I'm wondering why this paint was used. The previous owner barely used it (10 hours on motor) and kept it on a trailer.

  18. #53
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    4,951

    Default Re: School me on my boat!

    Quote Originally Posted by Moon Dance View Post
    Shoot, this is bad news! I hope this isn't the start of a money pit. I was originally looking at aluminum boats because they are so easy. I came across this one and instantly fell in love. But, aluminum boats are boring and nowhere as pretty as this boat.

    Looks like $1500 before I even bring it home (slip). The purchase price was already at the very top end of my budget (after bumping my budget up twice LOL). If you guys owned this boat what would you do? Is sanding it off and applying the antifouling paint the only real option? Do you sand off just up to the water line?

    Does "not recommended for immersion service" mean not to be used in the water at all or not to be kept in water? I'm wondering why this paint was used. The previous owner barely used it (10 hours on motor) and kept it on a trailer.
    Depends on what you consider to be a money pit. All boats need upkeep. The main difference between this boat and an aluminum boat is that the tin boat will survive longer without being maintained. If you don't maintain Moon Dance she will quickly deteriorate and it will take far more work and money to bring her back to the condition she is in now. There are plenty of ways to manage the cost of that maintenance though. Most people here on the forum do their own maintenance, or a large part of it, and I expect that few of us could afford our boats if we did not.

    If Moon Dance were my boat, I would strip the existing blue and paint the bottom myself. You could get it done for a few hundred dollars in materials and a few days in a yard. It's not a difficult project skills-wise although working underneath the boat can be back breaking. But there are other options. You could paint over the existing blue and just accept that it will have to be redone sooner than if you started from bare wood for one thing. Bottom paint does need to be redone every year or two in any case so that's not an unreasonable approach.

    Also I think you mentioned that the reason you are keeping the boat in the water is that you don't have a suitable towing vehicle, yes? But there are ways around that. A U-haul pickup truck would be able to tow that boat just fine and renting a truck for a few weekends would be far less expensive and less work than the slip, paint, cover, etc. I've done that in the past when I did not have a good towing vehicle. (That's assuming you have a place to keep the boat on land of course, but since you will have to store the trailer I assume that you do).

    Bottom line though, owning a wooden boat is a commitment. If you love the boat and put in the time to keep her up she will serve you well and look great doing it. But if that effort becomes a chore and you let it go then it gets much harder to bring her back. Maintaining an existing finish that is in good condition is far, far less effort than refinishing a boat that has been neglected.
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  19. #54
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Madison Wisconsin
    Posts
    10,195

    Default Re: School me on my boat!

    The typical boat topside enamels - Brightside, Easypoxy, Kirby's, etc. Are fine for short term immersion (day sailing, weekend outings, etc.) However, if you leave the boat in the water for longer periods - on a mooring, in a slip, or at anchor, most of these paints will eventually peel. I don't know of any "standardized" safe immersion time for the various brands and types but it is, in most cases, not very long. That's why it is called topside paint, as its lifespan when immersed and left that way is pretty limited.

    You could probably trailer-sail that boat for years without a problem, and even do a few short term extended outings with the current paint. You aren't likely to kill the paint while actually using the boat, and topside paint is better looking, cheaper and easier to work with than bottom paint. Unfortunately though, leaving the boat in the water for extended periods, on a mooring or in a slip, is a different story. It brings with it both the problem of nasty stuff growing on the bottom, as well as the potential for water absorption into the wood. If the hull is plywood, the potential to absorb water and its prevention is, in itself, a very big deal. If plywood planking is absorbing water, it is in the process of self-destruction. It's a great material for boat building, but it really needs to be well sealed (especially on its edges) if you expect it to last. If it does get water damage, it frequently may wind up being a replacement job, not a repair job.

    If it was mine, and if it is plywood planking, I'd strip it down to bare wood below the waterline (or maybe even a couple of inches above the waterline) and then epoxy-coat (probably three thin rolled-on coats) the plywood in that area, paying close attention to sealing any cut edges very well. After about a week of epoxy cure time, I'd sand it smooth with about 80-100 grit and then paint the area with an ablative bottom paint (probably two coats). First though, you need to know what else, if anything, is on the wood. If it is already epoxy coated, then you may not need to add more.

    Plan B might be to do very little to it at this point and trailer-sail it for a season or two to see how you like it, rather than storing it in the water. Yes, ramp launching is a pain in the ass, but so is dumping a lot of time and cash into a boat and the figuring out over a season or two that it's just not right for you. If it feels good and fits the bill well, you can always modify it for wet storage later. There is no doubt that it is a lovely boat, but you might want to get to know it a bit better before dumping a lot more money and work into it.

  20. #55
    Join Date
    Jun 2021
    Location
    Portland, OR USA
    Posts
    35

    Default Re: School me on my boat!

    Thanks for the replies guys. This really is unfortunate for me but I guess I need to just get it done. I was wondering if I could just use the boat now for a season and get it sanded/painted next season. The boat has 3 coats of paint that looks brand new. But if it's kept in the water, I would have no idea if/when it's coming off.

    I own a woodworking shop (probably why I'm drawn to this boat) so I wouldn't be afraid of doing the work myself. Although I have zero experience working on boats. However, I have a 3-4 months of jobs on the books and often work evenings and weekends (the joy of owning a business). It would make more sense for me to work on my jobs if I'm going to be working and pay someone to sand/paint my boat.

  21. #56
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Hills of Vermont, USA
    Posts
    40,402

    Default Re: School me on my boat!

    I just need to reiterate that the issue with the current paint & with bottom paint is not wood boat specific! The existing paint would have issues on a fiberglass, tin, steel, or aluminum boat. They also all need a good bottom paint.

    So - this problem you are dealing with is not because the boat is wood. Maybe try just leaving the boat as is in the water for a month & see what happens? You might be able to make it to the fall & then, if the paint is peeling off, it'll be that much less work to remove. The only issue with that would be worms getting into the wood, but I don;t think you have them where you are keeping the boat? I might be wrong on that.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  22. #57
    Join Date
    Jun 2021
    Location
    Portland, OR USA
    Posts
    35

    Default Re: School me on my boat!

    Quote Originally Posted by Garret View Post
    I just need to reiterate that the issue with the current paint & with bottom paint is not wood boat specific! The existing paint would have issues on a fiberglass, tin, steel, or aluminum boat. They also all need a good bottom paint.

    So - this problem you are dealing with is not because the boat is wood. Maybe try just leaving the boat as is in the water for a month & see what happens? You might be able to make it to the fall & then, if the paint is peeling off, it'll be that much less work to remove. The only issue with that would be worms getting into the wood, but I don;t think you have them where you are keeping the boat? I might be wrong on that.
    Thank you Garret. I have no idea about worms. I just got the key to the boat slip last weekend and don't know anyone there. The slips belong to condo owners so it's not a "real" marina. The HOA manages the slips and the guy I've been speaking to isn't a boat owner and doesn't really have much info to share with me. He didn't know about the different types of anti-fouling paint. I also don't know anyone who has a boat moored up in that Warrenton/Astoria area either so you guys are my only resource. LOL. Maybe there is a local forum I can join.

    Do you think there's a significant risk if I just put the boat in the water for the summer and plan on a refinish in September? If the existing paint starts to peel off in a month or two, is there a risk of the plywood being damaged? I have no idea what grade plywood is, but judging by the rest of the boat, I would think the builder would have used marine grade plywood.

    I feel like just doing it now though so it's not something I have in the back of my mind all summer.

  23. #58
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Hills of Vermont, USA
    Posts
    40,402

    Default Re: School me on my boat!

    Quote Originally Posted by Moon Dance View Post
    Thank you Garret. I have no idea about worms. I just got the key to the boat slip last weekend and don't know anyone there. The slips belong to condo owners so it's not a "real" marina. The HOA manages the slips and the guy I've been speaking to isn't a boat owner and doesn't really have much info to share with me. He didn't know about the different types of anti-fouling paint. I also don't know anyone who has a boat moored up in that Warrenton/Astoria area either so you guys are my only resource. LOL. Maybe there is a local forum I can join.

    Do you think there's a significant risk if I just put the boat in the water for the summer and plan on a refinish in September? If the existing paint starts to peel off in a month or two, is there a risk of the plywood being damaged? I have no idea what grade plywood is, but judging by the rest of the boat, I would think the builder would have used marine grade plywood.

    I feel like just doing it now though so it's not something I have in the back of my mind all summer.
    I can't speak to worms in your area, as I sail in Maine & we don't have worms here. My only experience with non-bottom paint below the waterline is a fiberglass boat that I had in fresh water (Lake Champlain) for a summer. This was hardware store Rustoleum & it did fine from June-October - no peeling or flaking & it was painted directly over the gelcoat - so nothing fancy.

    I don't want to give advice I'm not qualified to give! Folks from your area could better speak to worms, etc. in your area. I tend to think your paint - especially 3 coats & if well applied - should be fine 'til the fall - but I have to (again) caveat with my lack of knowledge on that. I do think you could check its condition fairly easily by either diving under the boat or getting in shallow water & having a few friends tilt the boat so you can see a decent portion of the bottom.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  24. #59
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Madison Wisconsin
    Posts
    10,195

    Default Re: School me on my boat!

    If the paint peels, the paint peels. It looks ugly. If the plywood soaks up water, that is potentially a very serious structural problem. Even some of the very best brands of marine plywood, like Bryunzeel clearly state on a label right on the sheet that if you don't properly seal the edges to prevent water absorption, the warranty is void. Other brands (like a lot of fir marine plywood) will check if the surface soaks up water. If you think you have a lot of potential work cut out for you now doing sanding, sealing and painting, repairing water-soaked and damaged plywood would be a whole new magnitude of repair work that you really don't want to experience.

    You really need to find out more about the boat's construction and materials before deciding what it needs or what to expect. We also have no worms here, so I can't help you with that.

  25. #60
    Join Date
    Jun 2021
    Location
    Portland, OR USA
    Posts
    35

    Default Re: School me on my boat!

    Garrett, that's a good point. I keep forgetting I can go in the water. Hahaha. Just so damn cold up here!

    That's what's got me worried Todd. Thanks for the warning.

    I called the boat yard at Port of Astoria and it looks like it would cost $300-350 for a week. That would include lifting my boat, getting it back in the water, and any environmental and storage fees. Do you guys think this is something a newb could do without help? I do woodworking but never touched a boat before. How do you mark the waterline? I think I'd be comfortable with sanding and painting. Making it look good/professional on the other hand...

    They put me in touch with a person who does this type of work. I'm hoping she's available. I see no other choice but to do it myself if she's not. I really don't want to wait til fall to have it done professionally. That would mean renting a truck each time during the summer and not using my slip. I have a Sprinter van I use at work but it doesn't have a hitch. I'm not sure if a 2WD vehicle would work. I've only used 4x4 trucks in the past.

  26. #61
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    4,951

    Default Re: School me on my boat!

    It's definitely something you can do yourself. There are plenty of guides to stripping and refinishing here on the forum, on YouTube, etc. Main thing to know is that you will need to follow the yard requirements for debris containment and cleanup exactly. Which probably means stripping with a random orbital sander and dust collector. The yard may be able to rent the equipment to you if you don't have it already. There are also posts about marking the waterline using various techniques here as well. Actually applying bottom paint is no more complicated than painting a room in a house. Roll it on, let it dry. Don't sweat the occasional drip. Follow the manufacturer's instructions regarding prep. Don't get it on your skin. Don't breathe the fumes. I have't tried Hydrocoat yet but that's what I would probably use if there is no other preferred product in the area. But your local marine supply store should be able to advise you there.
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  27. #62
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Hills of Vermont, USA
    Posts
    40,402

    Default Re: School me on my boat!

    I get cold! Diving on my propeller means a 7 mil wetsuit with hood. Bringing the boat into 3' of water & tipping her would be less traumatic. That doesn't work for me with an 8' deep keel.

    Can you do it yourself? Chris's comment on painting a room in a house is an OK comparison, but I'd say a room is much tougher. Are the fish gonna complain about a drip or 12? Certainly less than my significant other would... Additionally. this ain't a racing boat, so losing 1/10th of a knot will not be noticeable.

    You have a woodworking shop - so I'm guessing you've spent 15 minutes or more behind a sander. No difference other than awkward position. At worst, like sanding the bottom of a table. Proper gear (tyvek suit, respirator, and face shield) is all you need. I'm guessing you have the last 2 & the suit costs $8.

    I do understand the hesitancy, but I bet your skills are more than adequate for the job.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  28. #63
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Wellington, NZ
    Posts
    882

    Default Re: School me on my boat!

    Nice boat!
    Looking at the pictures and the quality of the finishing I'd put money on that hull being resin coated.
    To find the waterline, put it in the water and mark in on the bow and transom.
    You can then use a laser level to transfer the level to the rest of the hull.
    You will need to lift the waterline a little at the bow to make it "look" right.

  29. #64
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Dorset, UK
    Posts
    1,478

    Default Re: School me on my boat!

    How heavy are your mooring chains? I've moored boats in a lagoon and usually the pull on the mooring chain and the weight of the buoy and chain at the bow means the boat sits bow down at rest. That's when I'd mark the waterline and give myself an inch or two above it with antifoul. Otherwise a slight rise usually looks better. Just sayin as by the time you've done this, you want it functional when its on the mooring and secured to the buoy.

    If your busy you might be better just trailering it when you want to use it. It'll stay cleaner and less worry than leaving it on a mooring. Maintenance will be 10% of a boat on the water. Your having trouble just getting it antifouled, it's just the start. I'd trailer it if I were you. It's an easy boat to trailer and will actually be quicker than dealing with a tender as well. If you find yourself too busy to use it enough, you can then resell it in the same super condition more easily.
    Last edited by Edward Pearson; 06-11-2021 at 05:00 AM.

  30. #65
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Hills of Vermont, USA
    Posts
    40,402

    Default Re: School me on my boat!

    Quote Originally Posted by Edward Pearson View Post
    How heavy are your mooring chains? I've moored boats in a lagoon and usually the pull on the mooring chain and the weight of the buoy and chain at the bow means the boat sits bow down at rest. That's when I'd mark the waterline and give myself an inch or two above it with antifoul. Otherwise a slight rise usually looks better. Just sayin as by the time you've done this, you want it functional when its on the mooring and secured to the buoy.

    If your busy you might be better just trailering it when you want to use it. It'll stay cleaner and less worry than leaving it on a mooring. Maintenance will be 10% of a boat on the water. Your having trouble just getting it antifouled, it's just the start. I'd trailer it if I were you. It's an easy boat to trailer and will actually be quicker than dealing with a tender as well. If you find yourself too busy to use it enough, you can then resell it in the same super condition more easily.
    He's got a slip - not a mooring & doesn't seem to have a good tow rig.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  31. #66
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Dorset, UK
    Posts
    1,478

    Default Re: School me on my boat!

    That's fair enough then. Boats stay cleaner in marinas usually too. We have the odd boat on these tetradocks. Even a Cornish Gig! No antifouling.



    Last edited by Edward Pearson; 06-11-2021 at 05:19 AM.

  32. #67
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Hills of Vermont, USA
    Posts
    40,402

    Default Re: School me on my boat!

    Quote Originally Posted by Edward Pearson View Post
    That's fair enough then. Boats stay cleaner in marinas usually too. We have the odd boat on these tetradocks. Even a Cornish Gig! No antifouling.
    The kids in Florida use a similar dock for their FG 18 footer. Matt loves it. It does have to be hosed out regularly to get rid of critters that scratch the gel coat.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  33. #68
    Join Date
    Jun 2021
    Location
    Portland, OR USA
    Posts
    35

    Default Re: School me on my boat!

    Quote Originally Posted by Slacko View Post
    Nice boat!
    Looking at the pictures and the quality of the finishing I'd put money on that hull being resin coated.
    To find the waterline, put it in the water and mark in on the bow and transom.
    You can then use a laser level to transfer the level to the rest of the hull.
    You will need to lift the waterline a little at the bow to make it "look" right.
    Thanks!

    I'm guessing there's no way for me to know if it is resin coated until I start sanding?

  34. #69
    Join Date
    Jun 2021
    Location
    Portland, OR USA
    Posts
    35

    Default Re: School me on my boat!

    Quote Originally Posted by Edward Pearson View Post
    That's fair enough then. Boats stay cleaner in marinas usually too. We have the odd boat on these tetradocks. Even a Cornish Gig! No antifouling.



    Cool! This guy next to my slip has something similar. I don't know how it works. His boat is bigger than mine. Does this lift fill with water somehow? I had a close up pic but somehow it got deleted. But you can tell the boat on the left is completely out of the water. This is something I wish I had but it looks expensive. LOL.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  35. #70
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    St. Helens, Oregon
    Posts
    3,243

    Default Re: School me on my boat!

    I see what you're talking about. Yes...those use a pump that floods/drains the buoyancy tanks to lift the boat. Pretty slick, but spendy!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •