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Thread: Metal bashing

  1. #1
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    Default Metal bashing

    I'd much rather lay in my bunk all freakin day lookin at Youtube videos .

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Metal bashing

    No wonder he went though tooling with that initial cut - way deep! The resonance he was getting was vibration - causing a rough surface.

    A friend had a mobile bushing service - though he only went up to about 5" pins. Pretty slick setup to do it all on-site.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Metal bashing

    I use an old Van-Norman automotive boring bar for that work, it is limited to 5" dia. but can be readily adapted to almost any mounting scenario. Most repairs are excavator bushings but an occasional articulating loader or skidder which is a big job.
    You have to be careful what sort of filler wire you are using or machining can be "interesting"

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Metal bashing

    Quote Originally Posted by Canoeyawl View Post
    I use an old Van-Norman automotive boring bar for that work, it is limited to 5" dia. but can be readily adapted to almost any mounting scenario. Most repairs are excavator bushings but an occasional articulating loader or skidder which is a big job.
    You have to be careful what sort of filler wire you are using or machining can be "interesting"
    Yes. Any boring mill could have done the machining, and with less setup time. But I had never seen a bore-welding setup like that. Very nice.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Metal bashing

    No gloves? Face shield? Hearing protection?

    Tsk - tsk.
    Hope for the best, but plan for the worst.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Metal bashing

    Michael, gloves are generally frowned upon when running rotating, chip-producing machinery. It's a bit like wearing a necktie when running a lathe. Those long, curling chips often (usually?) have a very rough, frayed edge that grabs and holds the fabric of a glove. Like velcro. In the blink of an eye, the glove gets grabbed and pulls the hand in before the hand's owner has time to react. You can imagine how ugly the results of that could be.

    He appears to be wearing safety glasses which should be adequate for the job at hand, except perhaps when he is using the hand grinders. Those same grinders can be insanely loud, or not, depending on which particular models they are. So the hearing protection may or may not be an issue. I am not familiar with that boring equipment, so I can't comment on its noise level but, as a rule, boring was one of the calmer, quieter operations that went on in the machine shops (die shops) that I've spent time in.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Metal bashing

    Quote Originally Posted by Gordon Bartlett View Post
    Michael, gloves are generally frowned upon when running rotating, chip-producing machinery. It's a bit like wearing a necktie when running a lathe. Those long, curling chips often (usually?) have a very rough, frayed edge that grabs and holds the fabric of a glove. Like velcro. In the blink of an eye, the glove gets grabbed and pulls the hand in before the hand's owner has time to react. You can imagine how ugly the results of that could be.

    He appears to be wearing safety glasses which should be adequate for the job at hand, except perhaps when he is using the hand grinders. Those same grinders can be insanely loud, or not, depending on which particular models they are. So the hearing protection may or may not be an issue. I am not familiar with that boring equipment, so I can't comment on its noise level but, as a rule, boring was one of the calmer, quieter operations that went on in the machine shops (die shops) that I've spent time in.
    My friendís dad lost his ring finger that way.

    My metal lathe scares the bejeebus out of me. I treat it like the table saw balanced on lit chainsaws balanced on angry snakes.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Metal bashing

    Quote Originally Posted by Gordon Bartlett View Post
    Michael, gloves are generally frowned upon when running rotating, chip-producing machinery.
    I have been around enough machine shops in the past forty years to understand about gloves (and rings) in that environment. I was more focused on his lack of PPE while grinding - sparks flying everywhere and possibly into his eyes, close work with a loud tool exceeding safe dB levels, a kick-back of the grinding disk intersecting with knuckles.
    Hope for the best, but plan for the worst.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Metal bashing

    Rob, no need to fear a metal lathe like that. Just show it a half-ounce of respect and follow a few simple rules and you should be ok. One good thing about a metal lathe is that you don't have to put your hands anywhere near the work while a cut is in progress. I find a table saw a lot scarier just because when things go wrong, they go wrong at the speed of light.
    Regarding the wedding ring, a rather early childhood memory of mine was stumbling upon my parents in the basement utility room. My dad had his arm stretched across a table while my mom, using a hack saw, was cutting the wedding band off his swollen finger. He had got it caught in some machine or another, and had come close to doing some real damage to his hand. As far as I can recall, he never wore a ring again.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Metal bashing

    I treat every tool with a cord or battery like radioactive waste dipped in acid and encased in a bomb swallowed by a venomous snake.

    I have never worn a ring, as my fingers are always in jeopardy of being broken or caught. My Wife knows and understands this, and itís never a problem for either of us.

    My biggest problem with the metal lathe is my trepidation and lack of imagination, so far. Being able to machine metal effectively seems to have stultified the part of my brain that thinks up dumb stuff to make.

    Me no know how to think past saw and file.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Metal bashing

    Quote Originally Posted by mmd View Post
    I have been around enough machine shops in the past forty years to understand about gloves (and rings) in that environment. I was more focused on his lack of PPE while grinding - sparks flying everywhere and possibly into his eyes, close work with a loud tool exceeding safe dB levels, a kick-back of the grinding disk intersecting with knuckles.
    no, not focussed..
    he's wearing clear safety glasses as well as ear plugs while grinding

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Metal bashing

    You have sharper eyes than I do. But then, I cannot expand the image to full screen, so I am only looking at an image about 4" x 6"...
    Hope for the best, but plan for the worst.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Metal bashing

    Quote Originally Posted by amish rob View Post
    I treat every tool with a cord or battery like radioactive waste dipped in acid and encased in a bomb swallowed by a venomous snake.

    I have never worn a ring, as my fingers are always in jeopardy of being broken or caught. My Wife knows and understands this, and it’s never a problem for either of us.

    My biggest problem with the metal lathe is my trepidation and lack of imagination, so far. Being able to machine metal effectively seems to have stultified the part of my brain that thinks up dumb stuff to make.

    Me no know how to think past saw and file.
    I'm the opposite, I seem to have innate skills, metal and me get along. Friend of mine laid down an BMW GS650 with aluminum cargo boxes, asked if there was anything I could do, I said come back in a few hours. No experience with this, but I took out some body hammers I had just picked up cheap at Harbor Freight on sale, and gently went at it. He came back, I'm like "Sorry I can't do any better than this....", it didn't look like new, had some ripples, but the major dents were gone and the lid closed and sealed fine. "This is fantastic!" "OK." I've straightened dinghy masts perfect on the first try using a hydraulic press and lots of boards to spread the load, just taking things slowly, a little at a time. Got the press where I used to volunteer because there was a regatta over a weekend, and one of the Laser sailors bent the trailer/dolly axle running over a piece of truck tread on the highway, dealer wanted a fortune for a new stainless axle and not in stock. Serious bend, but nice even curve, no kinks. I said, "Y'know, if we had a press, I think I could straighten that out..." We go to Harbor Freight, he buys a hydraulic press for less than half the price of a new axle, we assemble it, I straighten that axle to within a millimeter and I'm like "Gimme a couple more minutes and I'll have it perfect!" and he's like, "No, that's really fine!" He left the press to the hosting org as a donation. I used it to straighten/flatten everything in sight. Masts. Bent stanchions and bases. Cookware. Tools.

    When I first was learning machining in high school vocational metals class, I somehow knew what angle to sharpen and set up lathe bits. Don't ask me how. Metal shop teacher looks at bits I just sharpened, "<my last name>, what makes you so good?" That was between, "<my last name>, this is one of your dumb days, isn't it?" It was early, I made mistakes, but got better.
    When you can take the pebble from my hand, it will be time for you to leave.

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Metal bashing

    Watching the whole video, amazing piece of equipment, I've never seen what is essentially a portable boring machine, plus rotary welder.

    Superb competence, no short cuts, outstanding work. I wonder what the press-fit size interface is? Went in smooth as glass, impressive, close tolerance on that big a hole with a portable borer like that is hard, I'm guessing .004" press fit (based on guess of .0005" press per inch diameter, can't over or under do the size by much.

    Oooo, I used an automatic (radial advancing) boring head on a Bridgeport in 1980 to cut a snap-ring groove.
    Last edited by Bob (oh, THAT Bob); 06-04-2021 at 02:57 AM.
    When you can take the pebble from my hand, it will be time for you to leave.

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Metal bashing

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob (oh, THAT Bob) View Post
    I'm the opposite, I seem to have innate skills, metal and me get along. Friend of mine laid down an BMW GS650 with aluminum cargo boxes, asked if there was anything I could do, I said come back in a few hours. No experience with this, but I took out some body hammers I had just picked up cheap at Harbor Freight on sale, and gently went at it. He came back, I'm like "Sorry I can't do any better than this....", it didn't look like new, had some ripples, but the major dents were gone and the lid closed and sealed fine. "This is fantastic!" "OK." I've straightened dinghy masts perfect on the first try using a hydraulic press and lots of boards to spread the load, just taking things slowly, a little at a time. Got the press where I used to volunteer because there was a regatta over a weekend, and one of the Laser sailors bent the trailer/dolly axle running over a piece of truck tread on the highway, dealer wanted a fortune for a new stainless axle and not in stock. Serious bend, but nice even curve, no kinks. I said, "Y'know, if we had a press, I think I could straighten that out..." We go to Harbor Freight, he buys a hydraulic press for less than half the price of a new axle, we assemble it, I straighten that axle to within a millimeter and I'm like "Gimme a couple more minutes and I'll have it perfect!" and he's like, "No, that's really fine!" He left the press to the hosting org as a donation. I used it to straighten/flatten everything in sight. Masts. Bent stanchions and bases. Cookware. Tools.

    When I first was learning machining in high school vocational metals class, I somehow knew what angle to sharpen and set up lathe bits. Don't ask me how. Metal shop teacher looks at bits I just sharpened, "<my last name>, what makes you so good?" That was between, "<my last name>, this is one of your dumb days, isn't it?" It was early, I made mistakes, but got better.
    Not at all what I meant. I have no problem nor qualms working metal. None. I can cut, file, weld, and grind with the best of the most mediocre (Iíve welded and hard surfaced for money before). I minored in IT; the not computer one. Iíve welded miles of stage framing, trusses, car parts, bike frames (brazed a few, too)... The hacksaw, tap and die, files, and various powered grinders are no strangers to my hands.

    My brain just doesnít think in terms of lathe projects, yet. There was nothing in there about lack of skill, or ability. ďWhat do I need/can I make/how to make it?Ē Order of operations and etc.
    The very first cut I made on the metal lathe was on an unknown allow with a tool I ground myself. It was a pretty damned good facing job, too; after I re-adjusted and removed the nipple.

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Metal bashing

    Because of the spalling of the bearing, some of the bearing steel (Rc>63) was deposited on the ID of the part. What he is doing is similar to "hard turning" and that chews inserts. I don't see any lubrication.

  17. #17
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    Default Re: Metal bashing

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob (oh, THAT Bob) View Post

    Oooo, I used an automatic (radial advancing) boring head on a Bridgeport in 1980 to cut a snap-ring groove.
    A universal boring head. They will also do tapers, machine and face a bore, or create a recessed spindle with a faced seat. A mechanical wonderment, they can be coaxed into making milled threads even.
    I have a couple of varieties (Wohlhaupter, Enco/Gamet) if someone needs a tricky bit of work I'm happy to oblige.

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