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Thread: lug rig downhaul attachment?

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    Default lug rig downhaul attachment?

    Are there any good diagrams of a lug rig particularly a standing lug rig showing attachemnts. I'm trying to figure where the downhaul should be attached tot the boom. Originally on my shellback it was attached with a few wraps around the boom and could slide around . When i switch to using a small dinghy vang for a downhaul I attached it right at the heel where the sail attaches. is there an ideal way and place of attachment?

    Mine seems to set a little more like a balanced lug. not completely but I get a couple inches of the tack in front of the mast.

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    Default Re: lug rig downhaul attachment?

    Are you asking about a tack down haul? On a standing lug it goes to the tack of the sail, not the boom. Standing lugs usually have no boom, but I suppose you could rig one to a gooseneck on the mast.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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    Default Re: lug rig downhaul attachment?

    Have you had a look through Michael Storer's website, he has a fair few pages on lug rigs.

    https://www.storerboatplans.com/tuni...ent-lug-sails/

    The plans on my Macgregor show the downhaul line attached to the boom pretty much where it rests next to the mast, and my control line in a similar location to the one below from offcenter harboubr />
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    Default Re: lug rig downhaul attachment?

    Given the option, this is my favorite way to handle the tack lashing, downhaul and forward boom mainsheet block for a boomed standing lug.

    JAWS.jpg

    The sheet it terminated aft (and/or to a crosswise rope traveler) and runs up to an aft boom block, then forward along the underside of the boom to the forward boom block. It then turns down to another block attached to the lower mast, centerboard case or other structure and back to the sailor and possibly something like a cam or clam cleat. The nice thing about this is that high sheet tension increases downhaul pressure (flattening the sail, which is desired at that point) and the tension on the mainsheet is pulling the skipper down into the boat - rather than up and out of it as happens when the sheet is coming straight down off the boom.

    SHEET copy.jpg

    If your tack corner and boom heel happen to be a bit forward of the mast, it is still a good idea to have a single, side-mounted jaw to stop the boom from moving forward and the downhaul line coming off in the vicinity of the jaw. If desired, the notches for the downhaul line and mainsheet block can be made in the jaw assembly.

    single jaw.jpg
    Last edited by Todd Bradshaw; 05-11-2021 at 04:29 AM.

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    Default Re: lug rig downhaul attachment?

    Quote Originally Posted by Todd Bradshaw View Post
    Given the option, this is my favorite way to handle the tack lashing, downhaul and forward boom mainsheet block for a boomed standing lug.

    JAWS.jpg

    The sheet it terminated aft (and/or to a crosswise rope traveler) and runs up to an aft boom block, then forward along the underside of the boom to the forward boom block. It then turns down to another block attached to the lower mast, centerboard case or other structure and back to the sailor and possibly something like a cam or clam cleat. The nice thing about this is that high sheet tension increases downhaul pressure (flattening the sail, which is desired at that point) and the tension on the mainsheet is pulling the skipper down into the boat - rather than up and out of it as happens when the sheet is coming straight down off the boom.

    SHEET copy.jpg

    If your tack corner and boom heel happen to be a bit forward of the mast, it is still a good idea to have a single, side-mounted jaw to stop the boom from moving forward and the downhaul line coming off in the vicinity of the jaw. If desired, the notches for the downhaul line and mainsheet block can be made in the jaw assembly.

    single jaw.jpg
    I would not be happy with bringing the tack of a lugsail aft of the mast, the luff rope will be forever chafing against the mast, and the luff tension will change a lot from tack to tack. I have never seen that done on any European craft where standing lug was used a lot both for foresails and nearly always on lugger mizzens.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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    Default Re: lug rig downhaul attachment?

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    I would not be happy with bringing the tack of a lugsail aft of the mast, the luff rope will be forever chafing against the mast, and the luff tension will change a lot from tack to tack. I have never seen that done on any European craft where standing lug was used a lot both for foresails and nearly always on lugger mizzens.
    My standing lug is set up with the tack just aft of the mast. I have not noticed either luff chafe or a change in luff tension on the different tacks. Mine is only about 100 sq ft. (It is a British made Drascombe by the way.)

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    Default Re: lug rig downhaul attachment?

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Palmer View Post
    My standing lug is set up with the tack just aft of the mast. I have not noticed either luff chafe or a change in luff tension on the different tacks. Mine is only about 100 sq ft. (It is a British made Drascombe by the way.)
    If it is this, it is a gunter, not a standing lug

    If it is a Dabber,

    It is boomeless, and I doubt that the tensions will keep the tack aft of the mast

    dabber.jpg
    The length of the down haul allows tension to pull the tack to the side of the mast
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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    Default Re: lug rig downhaul attachment?

    the luff rope will be forever chafing against the mast, and the luff tension will change a lot from tack to tack.
    I haven't heard any reports of this being a problem. Do you actually have any evidence of it?

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    Default Re: lug rig downhaul attachment?


    This is the boomed standing lug as rigged on my old Deer Isle Koster. Downhaul, tack and mast all lined up with a 4:1 purchase under the deck. I never did come up with a good solution to the main halyard (1/8" Dyneema) rubbing on the jaw, but it wasn't really much of an issue either. This an early picture, pretty sure I eventually went to Dyneema for the downhaul too.
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    Default Re: lug rig downhaul attachment?

    Quote Originally Posted by Todd Bradshaw View Post
    I haven't heard any reports of this being a problem. Do you actually have any evidence of it?
    Just my judgement as a professional engineer who can visualise forces. Lack of evidence is not evidence or lack.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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    Default Re: lug rig downhaul attachment?

    Just my judgement from over 35 years as a professional sailmaker, specializing in traditional sail types. Do let us know if you find actual instances to support your theories.

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    Default Re: lug rig downhaul attachment?

    Quote Originally Posted by Todd Bradshaw View Post
    Just my judgement from over 35 years as a professional sailmaker, specializing in traditional sail types. Do let us know if you find actual instances to support your theories.
    Traditional does not put the tack of a standing lug aft of the mast. Look at the Bisquines, Manx nobbys, Loch Fyne herring ring net skiffs and the mizzen of foresail and mizzen luggers.
    When the boat is on a tack that puts the sail to leeward the throat will be forward & to windward of the mast and the tack aft and to leeward, so the luff spirals around the mast about a 1/4 turn, hence friction and chafe. On the other tack the sail will all be aft of the mast, so the luff will be straighter, covering a shorter distance, so less tensioned.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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    Default Re: lug rig downhaul attachment?

    Good God! How could we ever tolerate that? Sails that don't set the same on both tacks due to interference from the spars? How freaking barbaric! Sorry if I don't agree with your opinion. Be certain to bring us some proof to back up what a terrible travesty it is if you ever find some. In the mean time, I have no problem with some folks choosing different ways to handle the situation, and since I have seen multiple actual working examples of what I illustrated sail just fine, I think I'll continue to do it the way that has worked for me.

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    Default Re: lug rig downhaul attachment?

    Since we're talking about a dinghy-sized and boom-equipped standing lugsail with the tack lashed to the boom jaws or aft of the mast, here are five of them. Photo-wise, I don't get a lot of action shots, since their owners are usually in the boats, so I tend to have mostly a mix of test-hoisting shots that I took, and pre-sail and set-up shots that their owners sent me. So far, none have ever come back with problems or received complaints, so I guess they must work OK.

    None of these sails have roped luffs. Instead, the luffs are reinforced all the way with extra layers of Dacron (usually five layers thick, plus additional corner and reef tack patches). It has less in-use stretch than a roped luff on dinghy-sized lugsails which helps to keep the luff firm and tight. Long-ish luffs may also be cut slightly hollow, another helpful step in keeping a firm luff.

    standing-lug-1.jpg

    st.-lug2.jpg

    even a little bitty one

    St-lug3.jpg

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    Default Re: lug rig downhaul attachment?

    Action video of a standing lug (reefed) here:

    https://www.facebook.com/brian.palme...06981256201448

    And not reefed here:

    https://www.facebook.com/brian.palme...13768597040727

    Brian

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    Default Re: lug rig downhaul attachment?

    These are excellent illustrations of the various ways of rigging jaws for the boom .Thanks a lot! I quite like the idea and it would be fun to build. I quite like the mainsheet idea. I was finding I was running the main sheet under my foot to take a bit of the strain and to belay it a little. I had been contemplating a cleat I could take a half turn around but I think going to the base of the mast is a better idea. Keeps the pull towards the centre too.

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    Default Re: lug rig downhaul attachment?

    These are excellent illustrations of the various ways of rigging jaws for the boom .Thanks a lot! I quite like the idea and it would be fun to build. I quite like the mainsheet idea. I was finding I was running the main sheet under my foot to take a bit of the strain and to belay it a little. I had been contemplating a cleat I could take a half turn around but I think going to the base of the mast is a better idea. Keeps the pull towards the centre too.
    Quote Originally Posted by Todd Bradshaw View Post
    Given the option, this is my favorite way to handle the tack lashing, downhaul and forward boom mainsheet block for a boomed standing lug.

    JAWS.jpg

    The sheet it terminated aft (and/or to a crosswise rope traveler) and runs up to an aft boom block, then forward along the underside of the boom to the forward boom block. It then turns down to another block attached to the lower mast, centerboard case or other structure and back to the sailor and possibly something like a cam or clam cleat. The nice thing about this is that high sheet tension increases downhaul pressure (flattening the sail, which is desired at that point) and the tension on the mainsheet is pulling the skipper down into the boat - rather than up and out of it as happens when the sheet is coming straight down off the boom.

    SHEET copy.jpg

    If your tack corner and boom heel happen to be a bit forward of the mast, it is still a good idea to have a single, side-mounted jaw to stop the boom from moving forward and the downhaul line coming off in the vicinity of the jaw. If desired, the notches for the downhaul line and mainsheet block can be made in the jaw assembly.

    single jaw.jpg

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    Default Re: lug rig downhaul attachment?

    My current setup. A bit jury rugged using the attachments on hand and an old dinghy vang I had, Excuse the mess I was trying heavier lines and all my lines are sized from my old Danica 16. I think the cleat is actually supposed to be on the starboard side of the mast and judging by the downhaul location maybe the boom was too, however that would put the halyward cleat on the front of the mast. I replaced the too small plastic cleat with this larger bronze one I had. Oh and in this picture i did the big no no of crossing over the figure 8 on the halyard..ooops. The black fenders are [art of my temporary floatation attempt. Will install foam under the thwarts tomorrow maybe.
    Last edited by Toxophilite; 05-12-2021 at 02:21 AM.

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    Default Re: lug rig downhaul attachment?

    Do you have any pictures that show the whole sail setup you are running? What sort of boat is it, as I said on my oughtred plans the down haul location is shown, it is probably about 30 or so centimeters aft of where you have it tied off in the photo, or roughly even with the end of the reinforced section in your sail there.
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    Default Re: lug rig downhaul attachment?

    Quote Originally Posted by simonmags View Post
    Do you have any pictures that show the whole sail setup you are running? What sort of boat is it, as I said on my oughtred plans the down haul location is shown, it is probably about 30 or so centimeters aft of where you have it tied off in the photo, or roughly even with the end of the reinforced section in your sail there.
    That sounds like a conventional balanced lug rather than the standing/balanced lug hybrid discussed here.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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    Default Re: lug rig downhaul attachment?

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    That sounds like a conventional balanced lug rather than the standing/balanced lug hybrid discussed here.
    I'm curious why you call it a "standing/balanced lug hybrid"--I would call it a conventional standing lug with a boom, not a "hybrid" at all. From what I've seen, it's pretty common to use a boom with a standing lugsail.

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    Default Re: lug rig downhaul attachment?

    Quote Originally Posted by WI-Tom View Post
    I'm curious why you call it a "standing/balanced lug hybrid"--I would call it a conventional standing lug with a boom, not a "hybrid" at all. From what I've seen, it's pretty common to use a boom with a standing lugsail.

    Tom
    Standing lugs do not have booms on the working craft where they were developed. If you want a boom, retain the simplicity of the standing lug by using a gooseneck. And tack the sail down to the mast thwart, or leave off the boom jaws and let the boom float.. The standing lug will then still function as it was evolved to do. Connecting the tack and its down haul to the boom with a jaw or parrel adds all the complexity of a balanced lug without the benefit of the balancing cloth forward of the mast.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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    Default Re: lug rig downhaul attachment?

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    Standing lugs do not have booms on the working craft where they were developed. If you want a boom, retain the simplicity of the standing lug by using a gooseneck. And tack the sail down to the mast thwart, or leave off the boom jaws and let the boom float.. The standing lug will then still function as it was evolved to do. Connecting the tack and its down haul to the boom with a jaw or parrel adds all the complexity of a balanced lug without the benefit of the balancing cloth forward of the mast.
    Maybe. For traditional working craft. But:

    As far as I know, it's conventional modern usage to call a standing lugsail a standing lugsail whether it's boomless, sprit-boomed, or conventionally boomed. It's still a standing lug, not a hybrid.

    You seem to be saying that unless a boom has a conventional gooseneck fitting, then the resulting rig isn't a standing lugsail. It seems to me that a more useful defining characteristic is the tack location relative to the mast. Forward of the mast = balance lug; at or aft of the mast = standing lug. As a result, a standing lug will always have an angled luff (one that intersects with the mast near the tack), where a balance lug is generally parallel to the mast, or close to it.

    Very much amateur, non-expert theorizing on my part! And I'm talking about modern small-boat lug rigs, not traditional rigs. I think very few sailors aim for absolute authenticity to traditional rigs--they want rigs that work well for today's boats and today's purposes.

    Tom
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    Default Re: lug rig downhaul attachment?

    Connecting the tack and its down haul to the boom with a jaw or parrel adds all the complexity of a balanced lug without the benefit of the balancing cloth forward of the mast.
    Sorry, but this is just plain wrong. The "benefit" of a standing lug vs. a balanced lug is that whether the standing lug has a boom or not, and whether the tack is located slightly ahead of the mast, slightly aft of the mast, or directly to the mast (all of which qualify as far as I care) the most important aspect is that a standing lug configuration allows the sailor to use upper sail twist as a depowering tool in a blow or puff. Twist is something that balanced lugs do not do well or much of. That alone tends to be the thing which usually limits their size. They swing like a barn door, on or off. In a dinghy-sized boat where crew weight can be used for balance it isn't generally a problem, but it certainly can be in bigger sizes where the standing lug of any sort becomes a better choice.

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    Default Re: lug rig downhaul attachment?

    Todd,

    thanks for that comment about twist. Would you say the balanced lug offers speed/power advantages for small boats (where crew weight can compensate for gusts), precisely because it doesn't twist?

    And that, a standing lug offers a different kind of small boat advantage, because it depowers automatically by twisting, thus reducing reliance on proper action by the crew--potentially making for a more beginner-friendly rig? At least with my simple rig (halyard + downhaul + sheet), there is no way to control the twist--it's automatic, for good or bad.

    That's kind of how I think of it, but as I said, with very little expertise to back me up.

    Another question: How much effect, if any, does the boom (or lack of a boom) have on the twist issue for a standing lugsail? I'm guessing not much.

    Tom
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    Default Re: lug rig downhaul attachment?

    Quote Originally Posted by WI-Tom View Post
    Maybe. For traditional working craft. But:

    As far as I know, it's conventional modern usage to call a standing lugsail a standing lugsail whether it's boomless, sprit-boomed, or conventionally boomed. It's still a standing lug, not a hybrid.

    You seem to be saying that unless a boom has a conventional gooseneck fitting, then the resulting rig isn't a standing lugsail. It seems to me that a more useful defining characteristic is the tack location relative to the mast. Forward of the mast = balance lug; at or aft of the mast = standing lug. As a result, a standing lug will always have an angled luff (one that intersects with the mast near the tack), where a balance lug is generally parallel to the mast, or close to it.

    Very much amateur, non-expert theorizing on my part! And I'm talking about modern small-boat lug rigs, not traditional rigs. I think very few sailors aim for absolute authenticity to traditional rigs--they want rigs that work well for today's boats and today's purposes.

    Tom
    No, I am saying that attaching the tack to boom jaws will be less efficient. Basically it worked fine for a coup;le of hundred years, If it ain't broke don't fix it. Or if you need a boom because you cannot sheet the sail without, minimize the change to the sail.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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    Default Re: lug rig downhaul attachment?

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    Standing lugs do not have booms on the working craft where they were developed. If you want a boom, retain the simplicity of the standing lug by using a gooseneck. And tack the sail down to the mast thwart, or leave off the boom jaws and let the boom float.. The standing lug will then still function as it was evolved to do. Connecting the tack and its down haul to the boom with a jaw or parrel adds all the complexity of a balanced lug without the benefit of the balancing cloth forward of the mast.
    I thought the idea was luff tension. That comes from opposing pulls, right? So the main thing is aligning the tension along the luff, or at least close to it, and parallel.

    I forget how I used to do it but at some point I had to re-rig the downhaul, and I thought, why not move the lower attachment -- a block on a plate mounted through the deck -- a few inches outboard, away from the mast. Works well. On the bad tack, the sail is deformed less by the mast. On either tack, the mast is in the way of the air flowing off the sail, right? Why attach the boom to the mast?

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    Default Re: lug rig downhaul attachment?

    Well I'm learning a lot so I appreciate the discussion. I got this boat knowing little about standing lugs other than an aesthetic appreciation and a reputation for use in working craft. My set up above is obviously wonky. It is a hodgepodge of the builders set tup (the tie down and jam cleat) and my experimentation. As I said above clearly it's not ideal. My brother is building me some locust belaying pins. The hardware on the thwart will go or be repurposed and the bronze cleat might migrate to the bow.

    I think the original intent was for the boom to be on the starboard side of the mast making better use of the tie down. I had it set up that way in the my yard but for some reason I switched it.

    I think the cleat should be on the opposing/port side as it'
    s set up now.

    Does it matter at all what side the spars are on are other than gear configuration? it doesn't seem like it should as long as lines are all running properly(not like above)

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    Default Re: lug rig downhaul attachment?

    Quote Originally Posted by Osborne Russell View Post
    I thought the idea was luff tension. That comes from opposing pulls, right? So the main thing is aligning the tension along the luff, or at least close to it, and parallel.

    I forget how I used to do it but at some point I had to re-rig the downhaul, and I thought, why not move the lower attachment -- a block on a plate mounted through the deck -- a few inches outboard, away from the mast. Works well. On the bad tack, the sail is deformed less by the mast. On either tack, the mast is in the way of the air flowing off the sail, right? Why attach the boom to the mast?
    True. Rigging the down haul from the tack straight down to boat structure guaranteed that on a standing lug.
    On a balanced lug lever rations come into play with the halyard tension being shared through both leech and luff to the boom and hence to the downhaul. Much more adjustment and fine-tuning needed to get it just so.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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    Default Re: lug rig downhaul attachment?

    Quote Originally Posted by Toxophilite View Post
    Well I'm learning a lot so I appreciate the discussion. I got this boat knowing little about standing lugs other than an aesthetic appreciation and a reputation for use in working craft. My set up above is obviously wonky. It is a hodgepodge of the builders set tup (the tie down and jam cleat) and my experimentation. As I said above clearly it's not ideal. My brother is building me some locust belaying pins. The hardware on the thwart will go or be repurposed and the bronze cleat might migrate to the bow.

    I think the original intent was for the boom to be on the starboard side of the mast making better use of the tie down. I had it set up that way in the my yard but for some reason I switched it.

    I think the cleat should be on the opposing/port side as it'
    s set up now.

    Does it matter at all what side the spars are on are other than gear configuration? it doesn't seem like it should as long as lines are all running properly(not like above)
    I would move the boom to the same side as the down haul block, and have the yard on that side as well if it is no there already. Then the tension will be in a straight line, and you will get less chafe of the boom on the mast.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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    Default Re: lug rig downhaul attachment?

    Quote Originally Posted by Toxophilite View Post
    Well I'm learning a lot so I appreciate the discussion. I got this boat knowing little about standing lugs other than an aesthetic appreciation and a reputation for use in working craft. My set up above is obviously wonky. It is a hodgepodge of the builders set tup (the tie down and jam cleat) and my experimentation. As I said above clearly it's not ideal. My brother is building me some locust belaying pins. The hardware on the thwart will go or be repurposed and the bronze cleat might migrate to the bow.

    I think the original intent was for the boom to be on the starboard side of the mast making better use of the tie down. I had it set up that way in the my yard but for some reason I switched it.

    I think the cleat should be on the opposing/port side as it'
    s set up now.

    Does it matter at all what side the spars are on are other than gear configuration? it doesn't seem like it should as long as lines are all running properly(not like above)
    A couple of thoughts on that:

    1. For right-handed sailors, it's FAR more convenient to put the boom/yard on the port side of the mast, so the halyard cleat can go on the starboard side. Opposite is true for left-handed sailors. I, for one, could not abide a set-up with the boom/yard to starboard--I am too right-hand dominant.

    1. With the boom/yard rigged to port, you'll be on the privileged (starboard) tack when raising, lowering, and reefing the sail. That offers at least a theoretical advantage as far as right of way, I suppose. Not that it matters in practice as far as I can tell.

    Tom
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    www.tompamperin.com

  32. #32
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Vancouver BC Canada
    Posts
    434

    Default Re: lug rig downhaul attachment?

    Cool and thanks! I'm going to pick up my belaying pins this eve so I can get that properly sorted and remove that hardware on the thwart.
    Might go with jaws, or a half jaw at some point too

  33. #33
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Bainbridge Island WA
    Posts
    3,972

    Default Re: lug rig downhaul attachment?

    I was pretty satisfied with that half-jaw I welded up for Kayli Marie, no worrying about it twisting and breaking. At the risk of repeating myself, you'll want a halyard with little to no stretch. Dyneema is nice if a bit slippery but you really just need to get the yard and sail up and tied off, the downhaul is what tensions the luff, you want to avoid stretch there too.

    How are you keeping the yard close to the mast? Beads on a grommet?
    Steve

    If you would have a good boat, be a good guy when you build her - honest, careful, patient, strong.
    H.A. Calahan

  34. #34
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Vancouver BC Canada
    Posts
    434

    Default Re: lug rig downhaul attachment?

    Well here's my new setup at the mast. Apologies for not having an entire rig shot I will take one tomorrow. I took off the tiny jam cleat and moved the brass loop to it's spot which is further aft, beside the mast rather than ahead of it. I put the spars on the starboard side of the mast because that's where the loop was. This set up was for today so I could go sailing. I arranged the mainsheet like Todd Bradshaw's excellent diagram above (of course it's excellent he's a fellow musician!) using a block attached to the mast base with a cowhitch.
    It was way better and I might even add a cam cleat too

    I wasn't using a parrel on the boom, but on the yard I have a piece of line attached to the yard with a rolling hitch that goes around the mast and clips onto a loop at the heel of yard

    The whole set up worked way better, there was no chaffing against the mast, the downhaul pulled the end of tack of the sail right to the mast and the sail looked way better(even if it is a humble polytarp sail). After a great sail during which I was able to help two large fellows in inflatables who had run their electric motor out and broken one of their little oars, by lending them a paddle. The fellow leaning over the side of the inflatable to paddle with the plastic blade of the oar was very happy. They had about 3 km to row into the eye of the wind to get back. They said they would wait for me...I laughed. I was tempted to offer them a tow but I was tacking back and I don't know how well it would've worked trying to drag them back and forth.

    Afterwards I went to my brother's and picked up my new black locust belaying pins, He was trying to tell me he would melt lead into the ends so i could still cosh people with them. When i said no no it was okay, he said he could make them pointy and I said no no they shouldn't be pointy. So he made me three with the third being a weapon..or a fid
    As I think my thwarts are red cedar I will at least leather the edge and I was contemplating laminating 1/8" thick hardwood around the belaying pin holes


  35. #35
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Vancouver BC Canada
    Posts
    434

    Default Re: lug rig downhaul attachment?

    Well here's my new setup at the mast. Apologies for not having an entire rig shot I will take one tomorrow. I took off the tiny jam cleat and moved the brass loop to it's spot which is further aft, beside the mast rather than ahead of it. I put the spars on the starboard side of the mast because that's where the loop was. This set up was for today so I could go sailing. I arranged the mainsheet like Todd Bradshaw's excellent diagram above (of course it's excellent he's a fellow musician!) using a block attached to the mast base with a cowhitch.
    It was way better and I might even add a cam cleat too

    I wasn't using a parrel on the boom, but on the yard I have a piece of line attached to the yard with a rolling hitch that goes around the mast and clips onto a loop at the heel of yard

    The whole set up worked way better, there was no chaffing against the mast, the downhaul pulled the end of tack of the sail right to the mast and the sail looked way better(even if it is a humble polytarp sail). After a great sail during which I was able to help two large fellows in inflatables who had run their electric motor out and broken one of their little oars, by lending them a paddle. The fellow leaning over the side of the inflatable to paddle with the plastic blade of the oar was very happy. They had about 3 km to row into the eye of the wind to get back. They said they would wait for me...I laughed. I was tempted to offer them a tow but I was tacking back and I don't know how well it would've worked trying to drag them back and forth.

    Afterwards I went to my brother's and picked up my new black locust belaying pins, He was trying to tell me he would melt lead into the ends so i could still cosh people with them. When i said no no it was okay, he said he could make them pointy and I said no no they shouldn't be pointy. So he made me three with the third being a weapon..or a fid
    As I think my thwarts are red cedar I will at least leather the edge and I was contemplating laminating 1/8" thick hardwood around the belaying pin holes


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