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Thread: Joel White Shellback

  1. #1
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    Default Joel White Shellback

    Hello
    This isn't a build
    It's a boat I just bought to do some nice quiet covid lake sailing away from the madding crowds.
    Light enough to tow behind my Smart but versatile and fun enough
    it's someone else's home build and largely done well, though the paint needs touching up as well as some of the bright work. I want to check/fix a few thing.

    The dagger board shape and dimensions
    Rudder shape and dimensions particularly
    The fellow who built it apparently used incomplete plans from a wooden boat magazine and I would like to perhaps rebuild both parts.
    From pictures of the boats sailing I can see the cool rudder shape. but I can't find anything definite,
    I was wondering if anyone had plans and could send scans and or clear pictures if actual units
    Some pictures of it in transport sadly the oars and other bits were in the car. I will try to get pictures of them up as well.


    Last edited by Toxophilite; 04-24-2021 at 11:57 PM.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Joel White Shellback

    Your boat looks great! i guess if I had questions about the construction I would invest in a set of plans?

    $75 at the WB store.

    Bill

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Joel White Shellback

    I saw that one advertised as well. Looks a lot nicer now that it is cleaned up. Maybe we will see it the Vancouver wooden boat festival in Aug since I see you are heading that way from the coast.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Joel White Shellback

    Pictures can be deceiving in both ways. The pictures in the ad weren't that great an the boat isn't perfect but mostly small stuff.

    I likely have to buy some paint and though I got a decent deal on the boat after some negotiations Buying a complete set of plans for $95 Canadian just to get the rudder shape, basic rudder construction and daggerboard shape, is a little beyond my budget. If I can't get a scan of that area of the plans(I don't need the whole plans though it'd be fun) a few clear pictures with some basic dimensions would be great and I can fake the rest. So far I haven't found a clear picture of the rudder on line.
    I have a nice long wide mahogany plank that would probably do the trick nicely. I will keep searching but if someone can help I'd greatly appreciate it.

    I also need to eventually make, or find a proper lug sail. It has a white polytarp sail on made by a sailmaker that is usable but it would be nice to have the real thing. If anyone has one unused they want to sell I would be interested as well

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Joel White Shellback

    What's wrong with the rudder? If you are just looking for the basic shape, one of the preview images here has it: https://www.woodenboatstore.com/prod...ellback-dinghy -- though obviously it's low resolution. If it's traditional, it probably isn't foiled in any particular way (just rounded out). If you are looking for something that has better performance, a cheaper, but not free, way of getting a good foil pattern, assuming you are willing to have a more or less rectangular rudder (not going to be the pretty shape in that image) is buy the plans for Michael Storer's Oz Goose. The plans are have a pattern (and instructions to make it) for a very good foil pattern that is also quite easy to make, as it is flat along the center (which means you can easily clamp it while planing away the rest). You'd have to figure out how to adapt it to your boat, but it doesn't seem impossible.

    For a sail, Duckworks has a proper 54 sqft sail for the Kombi sailing canoe. No idea if it would be the right shape, but it's the same area as the shellback...

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Joel White Shellback

    The rudder is a kick up type which I like, it's made of some sort of mahogany play, perhaps the same stuff used on the hull. However the blade is rectangular with no tapering or rounding to the edges at all, furthermore it has warped and is a of a potato chip.
    The only thing I don't like about the flip up arrangement is that there's no stop for when it's fully down, which ,makes no sense to me at all. If nothing else the 'blade' should be replaced.
    The dagger board is okay . it's not foil shaped but rather has a similar taper to the leading and trailing edges and if you sight down it it's a pretty wobbly taper. I'll get pictures up when I get back home.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Joel White Shellback

    Pictures. I guess I could just make a new straight blade for the rudder, add a stop, and use the wobble edged baggerboard as is for now. I like the tiller itself which looks like purpleheart. I discovered I have some bottom work too do (bad paint repairs tonnes of drips and a couple of small areas to seal so I'm going to paint the bottom white and do a black top strake.


  8. #8
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    Default Re: Joel White Shellback

    The 99 cent study plan might be enough detail for your rudder.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Joel White Shellback

    Hey Thanks, Good idea. I just did that . I'll see what they have to offer when it arrives. Kind of fun and certainly affordable!

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Joel White Shellback

    If you want to guarantee your replacement won’t warp, easy thing to do is rip strips and glue them together, aligning the grain as close to vertical but alternating (so usually flipping every other). You’re essentially making quarter sawn, but correcting for any flaws. Then run it through a thickness planer, do whatever shaping you want, and glass the result. Since you’re glassing, the initial glue can be normal (waterproof) wood glue like Titebond III, which will be easier on the planer / to shape.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Joel White Shellback

    My brother built one. I managed to break his nearly new daggerboard twice that day. (Don't ask)
    Peculiarities of the shellback foils are the shape of the board (yours isn't shaped correctly as you already seem to be aware) and the rudder, which is designed and sized with the board, to fit in the boat against the transom when not in use. Andrew build two boards for his boat, one that fits inside as intended, another that's a bit longer so will perform a little better as a daggerboard. The idea of a study plan is probably a good idea to get you in the ballpark. Andrew hasn't been on the forum in a bit but I've informed him that you've asked the question and maybe he'll have a chance to pop in and help you out with your problem.
    If one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours.
    -Henry David Thoreau-

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Joel White Shellback

    Thanks for all the great ideas and input. I am currently doing a little work on he bottom. The builder glassed the bottom(including the 'keel') and the strake up from that likely for abrasion resistance.. I noticed the the glass had cracked on the keel in a couple places so as I was planning on repainting the bottom(It had some weird 'epoxy repairs complete with drips(essentially someone was filling small scratches with too much goo) I decided to sand the glass off the cracked areas of keel and sure enough the little keel has some cracks that look to be mostly drying out sort of cracks,. i checked them and there doesn't seem to be rot. So I cleaned them out and filled them with epoxy, then I'm going to repair the glass over the keel. Fair as much as is reasonable and then paint.
    (I heated the area and let some regular epoxy suck into the crack a bit prior to filling them with thickened epoxy.

    One thing perplexes me. It seems to me that glassing over the keel isn't the greatest idea as it bas a bronze keel strip that is screwed into the keel. Is there a good way to ensure moisture won't get in via the screw holes (which might've been what cause of the original problem) It looks like there was some sort of rubbery caulking in the holes. Could I soak a bit of epoxy into them, butyl tape (like deck fittings), life caulk? Any idears?

    I want to also add a strip on either side of the keel for beaching probably epoxied on. Like black locust or something similar. I have a lot of locust from bow building.

    Also a paint question. It was painted with Interlux brightsides, most of which remains except for the keel repairs and a few small patches. I've mostly sanded the bottom nicely . Smoothing things out and scuffing up the old paint. I know I can put brightsides over brightsides, but I've read you don't want to put brightsides over epoxy, And over the epoxy you need to use the epoxy primecote rather than interlux precote. As I'm just priming a couple of small areas buying a $60 2 part seems a bit much. I'm not sure if I want o sand teh whole thing right down and start anew with prime coat as the old paint is still hanging on well for the most part.
    Are there any alternatives to put over the epoxy prior to the brightsides that come in smaller amounts and or don't cost and arm and a leg?
    Last edited by Toxophilite; 04-26-2021 at 10:22 PM.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Joel White Shellback

    This is a very forum answer - easy to write down....

    Having built Joels Nutshell; It isn't difficult at all to swap out the keel/skeg - if your going to have in in the shed, upside down and attacking it with tools and materials anyway.
    Check to see if its screwed from the inside, if not its probably just glued on. Take a template, or measurements at stations. Remove the bronze for reuse, chop, powerplane (screws!) and sand the old one off.

    If your going to glass the bottom you'll need to get pretty much all the paint off (car polisher, grinder type, with 60 or 80 grit sanding disks will do it in about 20minutes).
    Then glass across to whole bottom and replace the skeg with a new rot free one - epoxied on. This also ensures a permanent rot barrier between the skeg and the bottom.
    Replace the bronze bedded with something sikaflex (which may be whats there now) - or the dreaded 3m 5200.

    While at it, add a little bead of slightly thick epoxy along the exposed plank edges of the strakes. Sealed and rub resistant.

    Those little rub strips are a great idea. Epoxy on as per the new skeg.

    Paint - she's lives out of the water, and undercover?
    I used domestic oil base primer and an enamel topcoat. Nutshell lives outside, upside down, and not under cover - just fine.
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Joel White Shellback

    Thanks! This is a great idea but I wonder if I want to tackle it right now as there will likely be some good sailing soon and I'm always more keen to sail than fix boat.

    Also I want to try the boat out as well and see if it's my thing. I expect it will be. So my initial plan was to do just what's necessary to have her safely afloat and sailing. I plan to name her Coquille (roughly 'Cok-key-ye') which of course is French for shell

    The bottom is already glassed though I expect after it was built and then glassed over the skeg which I don't like the idea of as mentioned above.
    I don't really have a shed to work under. I tarp up the boat at night at this point and the weather here has been a bit wet.
    I do have a mahogany board that lengthwise could do the trick for a skeg in one go. Though making it out of a lesser board in a couple of scarfed pieces might be better use of materials
    I don't have a power planer(but could borrow one), nor a table saw, or a bandsaw. All hand tools though some good power ones as well. I could manage though. Maybe Recipricating or panel saw for rough removal and then planer could work too

    I will have a look if it's screwed on though, as replacing it over top of a glassed bottom seems a better idea than the current situation

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Joel White Shellback

    I have put one part Interlux Brightsides over epoxy without any immediate issues. As long as epoxy is fully cured, which I suspect yours should be. I have heard that the Prekote may be the issue as have been told it can absorb moisture, but I put it all the time on canvas canoes and they do just fine. I suppose it has more to do with boats constantly wet. As for two part paints, good luck finding them here in BC. You might be able to find Primecoat primer, but not the two part colour paints that would go over it, and you can not put the one part over two part primer.

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Joel White Shellback

    Thanks that's good to know. I will have some relative newish epoxy but I will give it a good bit of time and prep.

    Here's what I researched out about Brightsides. It is actually mostly an oil paint and should and has worked over most oil based primers.
    Also Yyou can buy prime cote locally and according to the literature I'm pretty sure you can use brightsides over it. However you don't want use it over brightsides and as I have a tiny area to potentially prime it seems crazy to buy a $60 primer. Though I know it's also a good bilge paint. STINKY though!

    I like the idea of regular and or marine enamel paints especially as this isn't a live in the water boat nor will it be a tender any time soon.

    Here's some pictures of where i was at earlier today. Hull mostly sanded except for the top strake (which I've decided to sand and either paint it the same blue(as I have a can of the brightsides) or black.

    I'm very sure the skeg/keel wasn't rotted. I was poking around the cracks with a screwdriver and it was pretty solid and solid in the cracks as well when I was cleaning them out with blade. It's seems like something like fir or a bit harder. Personally I might've gone with a harder wood for a keel.

    I agree that it's better to glass under the skeg but nor now I've cleaned and filled the cracks and I'm reglassing over the skeg at those points with epoxy.

    In the pictures you can see the products that I think an enthusiastic but perhaps slightly misguided person was using to repair some scratches and abrasions.
    the idea was good but perhaps the application was too enthusiastic. I know that when I mix epoxy i always end up mixing too much and I think a fair amount of tinted epoxy was glooped onto the abrasions(dripping down the hull!) and then for good measure the rest was spread on the very bottom around the skeg..over the brightsides.(you can kind of see two large cloudy patches in the picture from the stern) One the port side it wasn't adhering as well and I've sanded and scraped a bunch off. On the starboard side it seems to be attached pretty well.
    i will probably just leave it and hope for the best in painting.
    And or find an oil based decent primer and paint the the repaired skeg areas and any spots where I accidentally burned through to the wood(That's when i discovered my old orbital sander was hooped and bought a battery powered one)

    Then go with white brightsides

    Gypsy was suggesting a decent quality enamel as it's not a live in the water boat

    Any other options for painting over existing brightsides? I leaned towards brightsides because that's what's on the boat and I used it before on other boats and had good results.

    the cracks were in the side of the keel (barely visible now) and I discovered some ancient sikaflex in the tub of stuff that came with the boat, probably the stuff used for the keel strip screws)





  17. #17
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    Default Re: Joel White Shellback

    Glassing finished on the keel, next some rub strips on either side. In the meantime I drew up a version of the Shellback's ridder with the Pooduck's kick up


    Looking to do it in glued mahognay strips as suggested above unless I find some mahogany ply off cuts. (Don't want to buy a $100 sheet to use a couple feet off one end). I do have some 60 year old 1/2" mahogany thwarts from another boat that were finished and still very straight with no cupping etc. one of them is 17" wide.
    With wood that old would there still be warping with a solid piece? Is it inevitable?

  18. #18
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    Default Re: Joel White Shellback

    Maybe too late now, but if you were worried about rot in the holes, you could drill them out, and epoxy in a plug.
    That'll be a nice rudder.
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

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    Default Re: Joel White Shellback

    The brightsides tin will tell you how to use it.
    I would use the International Yacht primer, or Primocon (thick product!) if you think it will live in the water at some stage, then pre-coat.
    These are all single pack products.
    In NZ brightsides has been superceded by Toplac some years ago. Same product, but slightly easier to use.

  20. #20
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    Default Re: Joel White Shellback

    So I don't really know what the little rub strips on the bottom of a dinghy/rowboat would be called. I know there are rub rails generally a plank down below the gunwales but I don't know what the bottom ones are called. I'm winging this from pictures. The previous owner obviously scraped the bottom in some places and I'd like to able to pull the boat up o a beach if necessary so some extra protection seems like a good idea. It will also help keep it a little more upright on the hard.

    I was going to use some locust but my brother has the good stuff and he was unavailable today(and 45 minutes away) and I have some red oak that's 5/16" thick and about 11/16 wide.

    I was going to mark off it's location , sand off the paint and epoxy it to the bottom, using heavy weights to bend it to the shape. The 5/16" thick strips make this very possible. the red oak isn't ideal but it's relatively tough and basically sacrificial. I was contemplating glassing over it as well. Certainly I would seal it with epoxy, prior to painting.

    I was going to stack 2 5/16" pieces and make a rub strip 5/8" high, about 11/16" wide and 36" long

    Is this too high? would I be better off going with just the 5/16" high

    They were going to be basically centered on the hull fore and aft and about 7" away from the keel on either side, like this lousy but kind of to scale picture I drew on the bottom of a box
    Last edited by Toxophilite; 04-30-2021 at 01:54 AM.

  21. #21
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    Default Re: Joel White Shellback

    Well I went with it anyway.
    I spent a lot of time fixing someone's fix...Who puts *&%^&^$%^ epoxy over paint/ especially unsanded gloss paint!

    The rub strips with are glued on. Plan is to wash and sand smooth on Sunday and then paint the bottom.

  22. #22
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    Default Re: Joel White Shellback

    Some progress. Rub strips on and sanded . then I set to painting the sheer strake the colour blue the boat came with. Having not used brightsides for 10 years or so I learned one should really not paint on a windy day in a well treed yard. also it should be rolled on thin, or thinned. Lot's of gunk and curtains in my paint.NO problem ,smooth it out with 220, found some thinner stuff and what do you do for a temporary shelter if you haven't a tent?
    Why you make something out of ladders, clamps, a heavy tarp and some circus apparatus (not kidding)
    Worked a treat and I was able to roll and tip the white on the bottom. Went much better than the sheer strake, I think by the time I hit my last coat I'll be back up to speed again. The bottom isn't perfect, but it is waaaay smother than it ever was. This week, finish off the bottom paint, install hitch on smart car and rip strips for new rudder and assemble. Plan is to put the boat in a local lake the closest nice weather to the end of the week, even using the original rudder for now, for fun. Any advantage to having a solid mahogany centerboard?







    Last edited by Toxophilite; 05-02-2021 at 11:46 PM.

  23. #23
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    Default Re: Joel White Shellback

    Nice work, looking great.
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

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    Default Re: Joel White Shellback

    Thanks very much, I saw your sheathing prep was going well.

  25. #25
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    Default Re: Joel White Shellback

    Whiter and bluer...(2nd coats)I realized it's starting to look like a greek restaurant..which is fine I like greek food and all that. I might paint that sheer strake a different colour one day. Note to self when painting a sheer strake for looks don't bother to paint the bottom edge too as it's a PITA. Ooops I can see a curtain in the blue in the first picture. Ah well I was contemplating a third coat of both anyway.

    Also fixed up the old dagger board. Straightening out the wobbly edges some and generally making it more smooth and fair, resealed with epoxy. I'll be using it till I make something better.
    Got the hitch bar installed on the smart permanently (finally) My circus brother and I made it a year and a half ago and at that time I tested it out pulling a much heavier boat up and down local hills. It pulls the empty trailer (about 230lbs) around like it isn't there,
    Can't wait to finish the bottom and flip the boat over to play with rig and figure it out. Mostly familiar with Bermuda sloops , gaff cutters and gunter yawls.




    Still thinking about making a proper sail rather than a polytarp. Doesn't Todd Bradshaw have a tutorial somewhere about making a lug sail? I guess there's always sailrite and my friend does have one of their machines.
    It would be fun to have a small sprit and tiny jib too . probably have to rake the mast back though.

  26. #26
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    Default Re: Joel White Shellback

    I wish I was building one of the many lovely and cool ambitious projects I see happening here. I was hoping to get something pretty and fun that I could fix up quick so that my girlfriend and I could have a recreational activity that would allow us to get away from the masses. Up here all the outdoor recreation areas are packed! Every campsite is completely booked . I typically go into nature to get AWAY from people. With this boat I was hoping to explore some of the lakes where there are no power boats or irritating Jet skis..ahhh

    She looks much better right side up. Bottom done and just tweaking the trailer (someone had welding the front roller bracket to the receiver tube instead of the channel frame where it should be bolted). Discovered my trailer is one of those break back units. Neat. Just going to adjust the roller height and make a couple of large longer bunks. Also move the boat back a foot or so to get better balance and the appropriate tongue weight.

    Probably get the rig up tomorrow for fun and have a look.
    Spent the morning out at my brothers place ripping mahogany into 1" by various dimension long strips for eventually making a solid new rudder like the original shapely design but modified to be a kick up like the Pooduck's. Also cut strips for a new dagger board, maybe ply would be best for that as it's not really a show piece. Looks like Sunday and monday will be nice enough to put her in a local lake for fun.

  27. #27
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    Default Re: Joel White Shellback

    Spent a little time researching and monkeying with the rig. I revarnished the blade of the existing kick up rudder which I did manage to straigten though it will likely warp back. Good enough for testing. Replaced a trailer roller and adjust the rest to better heights as well as moving the winch back to achieve better balance on the trailer and a tongue weight appropriate for the Smart. I made new longer wider angled bunks with sexy 70s shag carpet.
    Took the whole thing on a test drive, towed no problem. Up hills down hills etc.
    Rig isn't quite fully setup in these photos. I just wanted to see how it looked in person.


    Last edited by Toxophilite; 05-10-2021 at 01:05 AM.

  28. #28
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    Default Re: Joel White Shellback

    Off to a nearby lake for a test float/sail/row.
    Was dismayed to find they had closed the boat launch are so as to protect pedestrians walking the around the lake path.
    I tried to explain that I wouldn't run someone over as it would spoil an entire day of boating but no dice.
    The nice man running the boat rentals offered an employee to carry the boat to the water and suggested a haul out place by the swimming beach where I could get my trailer down to the water. Spent some more time trying things with the rig and ended up using the halyard as a sort of parrel which I believe was how it was rigged before. A block on the yard and the halyard through the block around the mast and fastened to the yard's heel.. Took off from the dock on a port tack and she sailed vary nicely despite the variable winds on the lake. Tried different points of sail etc. INteresting to get used to sitting in the bottom of the boat and not on a bench.
    Took the sail down after a while and rowed to the swimming beach and grounded nicely on the soft sand. Pulled her up an the added rub strips kept her nicely upright. Maneuvered the Smart (which incidentally with a trailer fits in a normal angled parking spot) past a few barriers and using the break back trailer was able to haul out without even really ptting teh trailer tires in the water. All in all a success. Sailed well, rowed well. Didn't sink! Huzzah! Realized there was much to tweak about the mast and various other things. The lines used everywhere are to me too light, not for strength but for comfort, particularly the mainsheet. The rudder doesn't have forward swing stop..which I think is less than ideal, You can see on the rudder where it had clocked the skeg in the past.
    Sweet boat! Even my girlfriend enjoyed it..as a sort of bench.
    (excuse the wonky looking rowing picture. It's been a while)
    A brief action video
    https://www.facebook.com/bernard.bou...58517772744833





  29. #29
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    Default Re: Joel White Shellback

    Back home trying out a new rig set up. Larger lines and blocks (tufnel). The original tiny blocks were nice ones (ronstan I think) and low profile but they couldn't take a very big line.
    Halyard attached to the yard with a topsail Halyard bend..neat
    Separate parrel that attaches to the yard with a rilling hitch and clips to the heel with carabiner (why isn't it spelt like wiener?) for ease of setup (or at least how I perceive it). Switch out the awkward downhaul rig (tiny line going through a eye into a jam cleat it was too big for!) for an old dingy vang I had kicking around.
    Traded the too small cleat halyard cleat on the mast for a larger bronze one I had (Even with the original tiny halyard you couldn't do a round turn and two figure 8s around it without filling the cleat. Bronze looks cooler.

    I had some synthetic brown 3 strand I threaded through the gunwales as things to grab onto if necessary and places to hang fenders off. (Not necessary, or even authentic, just fun)

    For kicks I set a HUGE blk locust cleat on the bow(not attached to see how it looks)...I almost like it.

    Her's my lug rig neophyte question. Should the shiv at the masthead be fore and aft or crosswise? I thought I'd read the latter.

    Any useful rig suggestions appreciated .I'm winging it based upon my experience, and internet research.

    I disturbingly found myself saying to my brother "It's a great boat, but it'd be cool if it were a couple feet longer" Dangerous words. I'm still kicking ,myself about the catspaw I missed last year.




  30. #30
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    Default Re: Joel White Shellback

    i run my sheave athwart ships. I only do it cause thats where the sail is. I imagine it would be problematic otherwise.
    I've eventually come round to not bracing the boom, or the gaff, to the mast. Just leave it to the halyard and snotter. I find it just jams the rig when yer trying to lower it. I did have them tied on cause in low winds, with the boom to leeward of the mast, the boom knocked on the mast and it drove me a bit bonkers - but i'm at peace with the compromise now.
    A mate made me a couple of lovely little belaying pins that i have at the front of the thwart through which the mast goes, one for the down haul on the boom, and the other for the halyard. Works loverly.
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  31. #31
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    Default Re: Joel White Shellback

    I have belaying pins being made by my brother .Last time i went out i did away with the boom parrel, I might build some jaws or a half jaw for the boom at some point
    Do people do leather wraps on their masts or spars were the spars make contact?

    In the meantime I bought a 2" 2x 8 closed cell foam board and cut pieces to fit under my thwarts. Still have to cut some out for belaying pins. Going to glue them together probably epoxy and glass at least the exposed corners and then paint white or cream. By my calculations this should provide about 150lbs of floatation. going to put a tiny bit in the bow too.

  32. #32
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Vancouver BC Canada
    Posts
    433

    Default Re: Joel White Shellback

    Today I softened the corners and glassed the exposed edges and 2 inches underneath for the middle and stern thwart. Found a little free cooler on the side of the road in great condition that wedges perfectly under the stern seat..unless there's flotation there../ It would also fit under the middle thwart except for the flotation. If I notched the flotation and lost 10 lbs of buoyancy I could have a place to store the cold drinks.

    Cleaned up another couple things and now it's time to install the belaying pins and I have a question if other shellback or small boat owners could chime in.

    I have soft red cedar thwarts that are about 7/8" thick. I plan to lamintate pieces of thin mahogany top(3/16"-5/16" thick) and bottom to support the holes and add strength
    I will also be leathering the aft edge

    is this overkill?
    The mast is roughly dead center and 3" away from the aft edge.

    I was going to put in two pins.

    So far I thought about 6" apart and 1.5" (center) from the aft edge of the thwart this is from looking at pictures and thinking it out some.

    Having never used them except on a pin rail on shrouds I wonder what peoples experience has show them regarding location?

    Comfortable distance apart?

    Distance from aft edge of the thwart?

    Thanks!

  33. #33
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Vancouver BC Canada
    Posts
    433

    Default Re: Joel White Shellback

    Installed my belaying pins, re-rigged my main sheet and made a cam cleat unit(mark 2) atop my daggerboard. I've since redid the block attachment on the boom with real line and finished sanding etc. the base for the mainsheet cleat. Floatation is fully gassed sides and bottom and now painted white (I had a bit of bilgekote kicking around). With the new step up and some shock cord with one wrap around the tiller the boat will sail itself in light to medium airs. I'm really enjoying sailing this boat and even though it's just stitch and glue it's very nice to be sailing something that doesn't have an interior like a hot tub.
    The water chuckled down the sides nicely.


    Put some parrels on because my girlfriend bought me some wooden beads. I was trying out some polyester 3 strand as lug halyard, definitely stretchier than the yacht braid I'm used to. Right now everything is on the starboard side of the mast because that's where the old downhaul attachment is and I'm using a purchase on it. I don't mind it there but the eye attachment on the thwart needs to be repositions and all the old holes plugged, sanded and re-cetol'd (The cedar thwarts seem to be cetol'd for some reason, maybe ease of maintenance)

    Sail kit on the way



  34. #34
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Vancouver BC Canada
    Posts
    433

    Default Re: Joel White Shellback

    Allll byyy myyseeelllf I have a thread all byyy myyyseeelllff.

    Anyway Some fun progress and much sailing still in lakes till I finish my proper sail.
    Went with a sailrite kit for a few reasons. After shipping, duty, brokerage etc. it's till $400 cheaper than what a local loft quoted me. Only about $250 cheaper than a close US loft after shipping etc. but the readymade sail had a 2 month turnaround. I got my sailrite kit in a week, I borrowed my friend's sailrite machine and I'm well on my way. So I save $$ and I get some insights into sailmaking and hone my sewing skills,which is good. Also fixed a few small things.

    And I built a $20 boat dolly. not unlike a kayak dolly which will enable me to launch at lakes etc. with no ramp. There's a small local lake that I was using as a testing place and also a mild place to take my girlfriend out. They closed the ramp there so I had to either carry my boat (yuk!)or back it through a dogs leg between a drinking fountain and a post and then through some people, down to the water..yay!. Last time I just unhitched the trailer and rolled it down, but pulling it out after was a bit much. So a dolly will keep the moving around weight down considerably. It works well around the yard.

    Sailrite kit has been basically assembled. Still to do reef tack and clew, hems and grommets.Should get that done(or most of it done) tomorrow. My new nickname is "wobblyseams" Cool kit though, easy to follow instructions for the most part process too. Now I need a sail cover, and a boat tent.



    Last edited by Toxophilite; 05-28-2021 at 01:01 AM.

  35. #35
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Seattle area
    Posts
    738

    Default Re: Joel White Shellback

    Nicely done on the cart and sail - I look forward to seeing the sail when finished. If you don't mind my asking, what wheels are those and where did you get them?

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