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Thread: Louisiana capsize

  1. #1
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    Default Louisiana capsize

    I couldn’t figure out the news pictures of the capsized ship. It’s called a liftboat. Right side up, it should look like this:
    28CCE6B9-1B1E-4285-8361-DD909DD3BDEC.jpg
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  2. #2
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    Default Re: Louisiana capsize

    yah, it was difficult for me to picture too
    until i stumbled upon the terry bradshaw video
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Louisiana capsize


  4. #4
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    Default Re: Louisiana capsize

    They're called a boat but it's actually a self-propelled barge. The Secor Power (capsized vessel) is a bit different in that the cranes are built around the forward legs, creating more deck space. This drawing has the plan view backwards to the profile.

    SEACOR_Power_GA_Cranes_2-1280x1474.jpg
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  5. #5
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    Default Re: Louisiana capsize

    I have spent many months, amounting to years on them. Hideous things to try to sleep on, as the legs creak and grind in the slightest sea. The last one had a dedicated bodder to slush the jack up points with washing up liquid once an hour.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Louisiana capsize

    It’s a megayacht with a helipad!

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Louisiana capsize

    NAs, please educate us. It looks, to my eye, hard to capsize.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Louisiana capsize

    Thanks for the pic and drawing. From the news photos I was having trouble visualizing how that "ship" is supposed to look right-side-up.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Louisiana capsize

    Quote Originally Posted by David W Pratt View Post
    NAs, please educate us. It looks, to my eye, hard to capsize.
    It appears that the crane picks up its load off the end of the platform, out past the two legs. Too much weight too far out overbalances the structure, lifting the rear foot and pivoting forward about the front legs. But... BUT... speculation is easy and often (usually) wrong, and I am not immune to that. The USCC will do an investigation and the report will be public on the USCC website. Wait a year or so, and you will be able to read a detailed, step-by-step description of what went wrong, how, and by who. Until then, all you see is smoke.
    Hope for the best, but plan for the worst.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Louisiana capsize

    I've no idea, but it could have been legs up and caught in a storm. Imagine the Cog.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Louisiana capsize

    Quote Originally Posted by lupussonic View Post
    I've no idea, but it could have been legs up and caught in a storm. Imagine the Cog.
    a nearby buoy recorded a windspeed of 99 mph at the time of the capsize
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Louisiana capsize

    Google maps street view of the port that it left from. That might be same lift boat with legs up.

    port.jpg

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Louisiana capsize

    From the Coast Guard video, she is capsized in 50 ft of water, and was on her way to her job site. Definitely underway with legs up. Anyone know how long it takes to deploy the legs ?

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Louisiana capsize

    From the drawing, it looks like her air draft is more than 50'.

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Louisiana capsize

    Lots of top hamper to catch the wind and relatively little hull depth for her beam. I could envisage the windward chine coming out and the leeward deck going under at relatively low angles of heel at which point the righting arm will start to reduce.

    Lowering the spuds will have helped by reducing windage and a small lowering of KG.

    P.S. We call them jack ups on this side of the pond.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  16. #16
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    Default Re: Louisiana capsize

    Quote Originally Posted by mmd View Post
    It appears that the crane picks up its load off the end of the platform, out past the two legs. Too much weight too far out overbalances the structure, lifting the rear foot and pivoting forward about the front legs. But... BUT... speculation is easy and often (usually) wrong, and I am not immune to that. The USCC will do an investigation and the report will be public on the USCC website. Wait a year or so, and you will be able to read a detailed, step-by-step description of what went wrong, how, and by who. Until then, all you see is smoke.
    The designers and Certifying Authority will have sorted that. They may pump ballast during the lift to maintain positive loads on all the spuds. The biggest risk is poor soil strength under the bearing pads.
    One drilling jack up was lost when a gas blowout liquefied the soil under the legs.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  17. #17
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    Default Re: Louisiana capsize

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Pless View Post
    a nearby buoy recorded a windspeed of 99 mph at the time of the capsize
    I missed the big wind event part of the accident. I had assumed that it occurred during a lift operation. Please disregard my previous comment.

    Nick's speculation in his post #15 is much more likely. Once the lee side submerged and the windward chine became exposed, there would be more and more surface area for the wind to work on and less and less righting moment to oppose it.
    Hope for the best, but plan for the worst.

  18. #18
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    Default Re: Louisiana capsize

    2.5'-3' of freeboard on 129' beam, it doesn't heel very far before the deck edge goes under water, probably less than 5 degrees. And the barge hull has a huge chunk cut out of the forward quarter where the "foot" sits, this will limit CB shift when heeling, reducing GZ. Windage is huge with 3 legs 200'+ in the air, and wind speed is higher way up there. A naval architect who designs these things stated that while transiting (legs up) they are safe in winds up to 70 mph. I afraid I have very little faith in the Classification Society (ABS in this case) to have this "sorted". Highly specialized vessels develop so quickly that Societies can't keep up and real time experiments are conducted with the guys on deck lives.......
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  19. #19
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    Default Re: Louisiana capsize

    Quote Originally Posted by TR View Post
    2.5'-3' of freeboard on 129' beam, it doesn't heel very far before the deck edge goes under water, probably less than 5 degrees. And the barge hull has a huge chunk cut out of the forward quarter where the "foot" sits, this will limit CB shift when heeling, reducing GZ. Windage is huge with 3 legs 200'+ in the air, and wind speed is higher way up there. A naval architect who designs these things stated that while transiting (legs up) they are safe in winds up to 70 mph. I afraid I have very little faith in the Classification Society (ABS in this case) to have this "sorted". Highly specialized vessels develop so quickly that Societies can't keep up and real time experiments are conducted with the guys on deck lives.......
    Classification Societies can only certify the design as drawn and built. Once in the hands of the operators safety can be sacrificed for cash. I once worked on oil industry semi subs, and was told that the Rig Master (the guy who managed the drilling process) ruled, and could overrule the senior ships officer, to the extent that if they wanted to improve access they would cut out watertight subdivision, ignoring advice to the contrary. I'm not suggesting that the master of a crane barge would be so dumb, but there will have been pressures to get to the work site on time.
    I suspect that the Tow Master was not aware of the severity of the weather event and its inherent risks.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  20. #20
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    Default Re: Louisiana capsize

    Quote Originally Posted by TR View Post
    I afraid I have very little faith in the Classification Society (ABS in this case) to have this "sorted". Highly specialized vessels develop so quickly that Societies can't keep up and real time experiments are conducted with the guys on deck lives.......
    (Bold by me)

    So true. On a much smaller scale, I experience this with the local fishing boats. Transport Canada dictates that vessels over 15 GRT must be constructed to a Classification Society's regs - ABS is preferred - and within sixty miles of where I sit there are more than 100 boats of this size produced per year, all customized to the owner's desires. Some of the things that get done fall within an interpretation of the ABS Regs, but are questionable in terms of seaworthiness and construction efficiency. For instance, ABS decrees that solid-fiberglass panels (bulkheads, hull skin, etc.) are determined by thickness, regardless of fabrics used to laminate that panel. It is assumed that sprayed chopper-gun mat panels are as strong as vacuum-bagged triaxial fabric panels, resulting in seriously over-built hulls. Another failing is that seaworthiness is not factored. Since there is no limit on beam, but length is fixed, builders slice hulls open and spread the stern apart to gain more deck area, without any consideration to what a "pizza slice" hull form behaves like in big following seas. There's gonna be a reckoning someday, but meanwhile boats get - IMHO - scarier and scarier.
    Hope for the best, but plan for the worst.

  21. #21
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    Default Re: Louisiana capsize

    https://www.nola.com/news/weather/ar...53a6122bb.html

    Coast Guard Capt. Will Watson said conditions in the area on Tuesday at 4:30 p.m. as the Seacor Power sank included winds of 80 to 90 mph and waves of 7 to 9 feet. He said the intensity was unexpected.

    However, the Weather Service had issued a series of seven special marine warnings for locations in southeast Louisiana, including Port Fourchon, that began before the lift boat left Port Fourchon at 1:30 p.m., on its way to a drilling site at Main Pass 138, about 40 miles east of Venice. Each message warned of tropical storm force winds - 39 mph or greater - accompanied by "suddenly higher waves." The warnings were aimed at the effects of both the original line of thunderstorms and the high winds accompanying the wake low moving south into the Gulf.
    “Make sure all on board are wearing life jackets. Return to safe harbor if possible. Large hail could result in injury and damage to boats ... vessels and oil rigs,” the first warning said.

    At 2:57 p.m., a marine warning was issued for a large area along the Gulf Coast, including Grand Isle and Port Fourchon and extending to the lower Atchafalaya River. The warning extended 20 nautical miles into the Gulf, the area where the Seacor vessel was cruising.

    “Boats could sustain damage or capsize. Make sure all on board are wearing life jackets. Return to safe harbor if possible. Large hail could result in injury and damage to boats ... vessels and oil rigs,” the warning said.

    At 3:58 p.m., forecasters issued another warning for that part of the coast and offshore. The warnings to return to harbor were repeated.

    At 4:29 p.m., just a minute before the first distress call to the Coast Guard, another warning was issued that included threats of wind gusts of 60 mph or greater and possible waterspouts.

    “They would have experienced several hours of high winds,” Grigsby said of the area where the Seacor Power capsized. “The winds stayed up to 50 mph or more for several hours.”

  22. #22
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