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Thread: 22-25' canoe plans

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Vienna, Virginia
    Posts
    47

    Default 22-25' canoe plans

    http://www.fabrication-canot.com/eng...-available.php

    anyone know of plans for something similar, perhaps in cedar strip?

    most canoes seem to top out at 18' from what i can see. historically it seems there were much larger canoes up north.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    308

    Default Re: 22-25' canoe plans

    See http://wcha.org/catalogs/plans.html for a dated list of plans including three 20 foot ones. Good luck,

    Benson

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Vienna, Virginia
    Posts
    47

    Default Re: 22-25' canoe plans

    Appreciate it. looking for even bigger though. the 20' only has a depth of 15''

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Location
    Barrie, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    6,321

    Default Re: 22-25' canoe plans

    They are still in use along the shores of Hudson Bay as you probably know, although with square sterns and 25-40 hp motors. Also used in Labrador.



    Sorry, no plans source comes to mind.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Madison Wisconsin
    Posts
    10,127

    Default Re: 22-25' canoe plans

    There are lines drawings in the Adney and Chapelle book "The Bark Canoes and Skin Boats of North America" for original fur trade canoes from the low 20s up to 36' in length. There are no offsets given, but it is possible to blow up the cross section and stem portions of the drawings, check the forms you cut with battens and build strippers on them. That's what I did for my 22' North canoe, which would probably technically be called a "three and a half fathom Rabeska". I added a tapered wedge of extra beam to the sections, increasing the beam by about 6" for more stability.

    voyageur-plan.jpg

    wearing the original varnished redwood strips about 1976 or so.

    Rbig 3.jpg

    current painted version (better UV protection and I always wondered how good of a fake bark paint job I could manage.)

    lau3.jpg

    However, if your intention is to build a group paddling canoe similar to those you might find at camps or theme parks, you will want to change the hull cross sections substantially. Real fur trade canoes generally had narrow bottoms and heavily flared sides, and they were nearly always run with a big load sitting as ballast in the bottom. Without it, they can be pretty tippy. Six or eight people all in a twitchy canoe does not make for a fun excursion. So what is usually done for the canoes like you might see at Frontierland park is that they will have the stem and sheer profiles of a fur trade canoe, but in cross section they are shaped like an oversized, modern recreational canoe - wide and with a shallow arched or flat bottom and without much flare.

    I consulted by email a few years back with a church youth group interested in building a small fleet of (I believe they were) 25' strippers for group paddling. We actually wound up using the lines of the Bear Mountain Canoes "Freedom 17" stripper design, enlarged and with the stem profiles changed.

    rollie.jpg

    Another critical factor is flexibility. Strippers won't tolerate an awful lot of flex without breaking. A solid gunwale/thwart structure helps up top. The bottom also needs to be reinforced with internal cross ribs glassed into the floor or similar structure to eliminate bottom bounce. Also keep in mind that a big canoe full of paddlers has a fair bit of momentum if you tag a rock on the river bottom. A pretty hefty glass layup is a good idea, especially on the lower part of the stems.
    Last edited by Todd Bradshaw; 04-15-2021 at 08:14 PM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    northeast Ohio
    Posts
    2,554

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