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Thread: Ultralight Rowboat Derived from Canoe?

  1. #36
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    8,055

    Default Re: Ultralight Rowboat Derived from Canoe?

    I built a canoe cart out of PVC several years ago. It was easy to make and makes moving the canoe or other small boats a lot easier
    Elect a clown expect a circus

  2. #37
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Seattle area
    Posts
    752

    Default Re: Ultralight Rowboat Derived from Canoe?

    I have a question about firmness in the bilge. In this Rangeley boat (plans available from mystic), which at 14'7" LOA and 3'3" beam is similar in overall size and shape to the boat I'm imagining (14'6" LOA, 3'7" beam), the bilge is very firm in the center of the boat but tapers off fairly rapidly FWD and AFT of the center two stations as shown on the waterlines.

    Rangeley:
    wsp7_45-1.jpg

    Is this preferable to carrying the firmness farther towards the ends of the boat, as in the boat I'm noodling around with? This drawing shows 2", 4" and 6" waterlines:

    Modified GA boat:
    EXPLORER_14_V-07a_LINES_01.jpg

    A related question for those with skin on frame experience: The station sections and stringers are all convex curves, but there is still some hollowness in the bow and stern below the 6" WL, as shown above. I would think that it's preferable to remove the hollows so the skin lays against the frames and stringers - how important is this? None of the plans for SOF boats that I have show lines; all show station molds only, so without digitizing them and redrawing the lines I don't know if they are convex on the waterlines.

  3. #38
    Join Date
    Apr 2020
    Location
    Chicago, IL, USA
    Posts
    95

    Default Re: Ultralight Rowboat Derived from Canoe?

    If you look at photos of boats on Dave Gentry's site, such a Ruth or the Shenandoah Whitehall, there are quite a few that show the ends. It looks to me like the stringers are visible and seem to be supporting the skin right to the ends. (I don't know about GA boats.) It sort of depends on how you build it. At the same time, there will always be some "hollowness" between the stringers and the keel below the WL, simply because of the pressure of the water. But I don't think that's a problem. It helps keep the boat going straight.

  4. #39
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Lima, Peru
    Posts
    23

    Default Re: Ultralight Rowboat Derived from Canoe?

    I am not even close to being a navel architect or even understanding stability. It seems to me that a dory is a canoe. The dory and the canoe both have difficulty in initial stability. As I understand stability, primary stability makes a boat seem unstable, but it is the secondary stability that makes the boat seaworthy. That is why the dory has good stability. It is essentially round from the bottom to the garboard. I understand that stability is about the center of gravity and the center of flotation remain vertical to maintain stability. A round boat does this where a flat sided boat does not. That means that in heel a straight sided boat will capsize without warning where a dory will maintain stability all the way up to the garboard. This does not come from any experience or experimentation on my part. It is just something that I read.

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