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Thread: Ferrous fittings on outboards

  1. #1
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    Default Ferrous fittings on outboards

    Is there a good reason Honda puts a ferrous screw on the carburetor drain? There is no way in hell I can get that rusted glob open to drain the bad gas. Best I can do is tip the motor upside down and drain the tank through the filler cap. But that is probably leaving water contaminated fuel in the carburetor and preventing it from starting. This is the second Honda 2HP Iíve had (first was stolen) and both have had this problem. Seems like even nylon would be better than ferrous iron.

  2. #2
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    South Puget Sound/summer Eastern carib./winter
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    Default Re: Ferrous fittings on outboards

    Maybe, In case one ever gets it out, and it goes zoink and pops into the sea, one can fish it back up with a magnet.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Ferrous fittings on outboards

    They sell a lot of carburetors

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Ferrous fittings on outboards

    There is a reason...but I can’t remember what it is.

    Spray it with a decent penetrant daily for a week before you break it.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Ferrous fittings on outboards

    Quote Originally Posted by Canoeyawl View Post
    They sell a lot of carburetors
    Yup. And I guess they just sold me one unless someone knows of a magic elixir I can pour in the gas tank.

    I’ve rebuilt a lot of carburetors in my youth, no longer have the patience to tackle this one. My own fault, because I use it all winter I don’t really ‘winterize’ it. But I should have been more careful with non-ethanol and/or stabilizers. Still, a ferrous rusted glob where the fuel drain should be is inexcusable. If the new one is also iron, I guess I’ll devise a little cup of petroleum jelly to keep around it.

  6. #6
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    Hills of Vermont, USA
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    Default Re: Ferrous fittings on outboards

    The drain bolts in their small engines (lawnmowers, etc.) are just a 6mm bolt with a fiber washer. Maybe you could find a brass or Nylon one? Stainless is probably not a good idea with aluminum.

    If it's just the head rusting maybe paint it with engine enamel which is gas resistant? Paint with epoxy?
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Ferrous fittings on outboards

    The "tell-tale" bolt on my otherwise well built Tohatsu is corroded into place. A PO tried vise-grips on it at some point, it is a craggy little nubbin now but as long as water keeps squirting out I'll keep ignoring it.
    Steve

    If you would have a good boat, be a good guy when you build her - honest, careful, patient, strong.
    H.A. Calahan

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Ferrous fittings on outboards

    Isn't the whole thing held together by ferrous fastenings?Maybe that particular one ought to have been plated.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Ferrous fittings on outboards

    A little anti-seize and regular maintenance goes a long way towards keeping the fasteners from welding themselves in place but material choice helps.
    Steve

    If you would have a good boat, be a good guy when you build her - honest, careful, patient, strong.
    H.A. Calahan

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Ferrous fittings on outboards

    Took the carb off. The drain plug is a headless slotted brass plug Recessed into a ferrous metal float bowl. Once the float bowl rusts around the recessed brass plug, it ain’t coming out, even on the bench. Sort of good news is a new carb is only about $75 and easy to install. On the new one, I’ll try to replace the drain plug with something with a gripable head, and I’ll grease the hell out of it.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Ferrous fittings on outboards

    I was pleasantly surprised how cheap a replacement carb on my Tohatsu was after I broke a bit of plastic on it, couldn't get parts, just the whole carb!

    As a committed airhead for decades I'm pretty well convinced that the legendary reliability of those old BMW motorcycles is at least partly based on the maintenance cycle, one the "do every couple of years" items is lube the transmission output shaft the dry clutch runs on which means taking the back half of the bike apart to apply a wee bit of grease to the splines.
    Steve

    If you would have a good boat, be a good guy when you build her - honest, careful, patient, strong.
    H.A. Calahan

  12. #12
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    seattle
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    Default Re: Ferrous fittings on outboards

    Bought a new carb, $65 at the dealer which happens to be just a few blocks from my house. The new one has a stainless drain plug where the old one had brass. But of course it wasn’t the plug that rusted but rather the housing. I’m going to slather this one with petroleum jelly and keep an eye on it. Also close by is a gas station that sells ethanol free gas, but they are out. So I drove across town for two gallons of e-less gas. I’ll add stabilizer to it anyway, but never ethanol in the outboard again.

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