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Thread: Kill Switch Lanyards ( ECOD) To Be Required April 1 2021

  1. #36
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    Mar 2007
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    East Quogue,NY
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    Default

    [QUOTE=ron ll;6409457]
    Quote Originally Posted by Breakaway View Post

    No key. Engine is stopped by pulling and holding a cable that cuts off fuel.


    So an extension to that cable could be rigged.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  2. #37
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    Feb 2006
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    Default Re: Kill Switch Lanyards ( ECOD) To Be Required April 1 2021

    You could put a spring under the knob and rig a pin on a lanyard to hold it in.
    -Dave

  3. #38
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    Hills of Vermont, USA
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    Default Re: Kill Switch Lanyards ( ECOD) To Be Required April 1 2021

    Diesels have either a manual or electric (solenoid) fuel shutoff. My Yanmar has a solenoid - as do my tractors.

    I'm sure there are conversions available for the 3-71. Here's a 24 volt one: https://www.ebay.com/itm/13282573691...xoCC7UQAvD_BwE

    Bruce (Wizbang) talks above about how he runs a shutoff line overboard.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  4. #39
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    Saint Helena Island, SC
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    Default Re: Kill Switch Lanyards ( ECOD) To Be Required April 1 2021

    I make a habit of wearing one. Clip it to the D ring on my inflatable PFD. The electronic one looks interesting. Might have to change to that as it’d be nice not to have to unhook to hand a fender or tie up.
    Fight Entropy, build a wooden boat!

  5. #40
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
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    Brewer, Maine
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    Default Re: Kill Switch Lanyards ( ECOD) To Be Required April 1 2021

    The problem with a kill switch lanyard is that if you are wearing one and you fall overboard, your problems are just beginning. You still have to get to the boat and get yourself in it. To avoid these challenges, I wear a safety tether attached near the helm and affixed to my PFD with a double action hook.

  6. #41
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    Mar 2007
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    Default Re: Kill Switch Lanyards ( ECOD) To Be Required April 1 2021

    Still confused and unsure of the wording of this law, I reached out to the Coast Guard for clarification. The first statement about boat length seems at odds with another part that references the date the boat was built.

    Using the USCG FAQ page to clarify ( underline is mine):

    FAQ3
    Q3. Who needs to use an Engine Cut-off Swith Link ECOSL? A3. All operators of recreational boats less than 26’ in length that have an Engine Cut-Off Device installed.

    Applies to the person operating the boat.

    Q6. What boats need to have an Engine Cut-Off Switch installed? A6. Boats less than 26 feet in length that generate more than 115lbs of static thrust (~ 2-3hp) and were built beginning in January 2020. If the boats’ primary helm is inside an enclosed cabin it is not required to have an Engine Cut-Off Switch.

    This applies to the boat, not the operator. It states which boats must have an ECOS installed aboard.

    So, according to USCG, if the boat is less than 26' LOA and has an ECOS installed, the operator must wear it. The 2020 date is the date beyond which boats must have an ECOS installed rather than a compliance date for operators.

    EX: If you operate a 2019 boat, with no ECOS installed, you do not need to wear one. However, if your 2019 boat does have a ECOS, you must wear it. ( Barring the exceptions noted below)

    Exceptions:

    -boat has a fully enclosed helm
    -boat is operating at displacement speed
    -boat is performing docking maneuvers.

    Kevin
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  7. #42
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    PNW, an island west of Seattle
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    Default Re: Kill Switch Lanyards ( ECOD) To Be Required April 1 2021

    The exception re the enclosed helm is nuts. It doesn't take too much to imagine: One person, solo, leaves the harbor in an enclosed cabin cruiser. Notices that a fender is dragging, slows down to 2 knots (just enough to maintain a heading in the moderate breeze without inducing any pounding), leaves cabin to retrieve the fender. Loses balance with an unseen cross wake, slips on deck, goes overboard when reaching for fender. Boat has a good day without her skipper until she either runs out of fuel, hits the opposite coast, or hits another vessel. Skipper swims a lot. Or not. The enclosed cabin remains a warm friendly environment all by itself.

    I think the moral of my story is to use one of these cutoff devices. Reading this thread has woke me up.

    Jeff

  8. #43

    Default Re: Kill Switch Lanyards ( ECOD) To Be Required April 1 2021

    It is also a good idea to have a spare key attached somewhere close to the switch. That way if you go overboard with the key connected to you, your passengers will be able to start the engine to come pick you up.

  9. #44
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    Eagan, Minnesota, USA
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    Default Re: Kill Switch Lanyards ( ECOD) To Be Required April 1 2021

    (Imagines husband, wife, and son-in-law in the water, each with a safety key; daughters aboard have no keys. We need a better plan.)
    Await dreams, loves, life; | There is always tomorrow. | Until there is not.

    Grieving love unsaid. | Tomorrow will fail someday. | Tell them today, OK?

  10. #45
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    Default Re: Kill Switch Lanyards ( ECOD) To Be Required April 1 2021

    (Imagines husband, wife, and son-in-law in the water, each with a safety key; daughters aboard have no keys. We need a better plan.)
    This is a vote in favor of the electronic devices. These kill the engines but allow them to be restarted immediately.

    Or, do as Mr Morgan states in #45. Keep a spare aboard near the helm.

    Kevin
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

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