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Thread: Quick-Build Cheap Shop Cleats

  1. #1
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    Default Quick-Build Cheap Shop Cleats

    I haul a lot of items up to the ceiling of my shop for storage or painting and whatever. So the other day I made 6 of these from a scrap of ironwood retrieved from the woodpile.

    The innovation is to use 3/8" copper brake tubing as the spacers. I used #10 screws, but of course you could use heavier stock, or bolts.

    I don't think I'd put them on a boat, but they're handy around my property, and much more pleasant to use than two 5-in nails driven-in on angles.

    IMG_8290 (2) sm.jpg

    IMG_8288 (2).jpg

    Dave

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Quick-Build Cheap Shop Cleats

    Those work. I dunno about airplanes, but I sure hope you aren't using copper tubing for brake lines on a car! While they may work for a gentle stop, a panic stop will pop them.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Quick-Build Cheap Shop Cleats

    I have done similar in the past, Dave. (I used sections of an old ash hockey stick - how Canadian, eh?) Works like a charm. I found that the 1/2" copper water pipe that I used for the spacers cut their way into the timber they were resting against, causing them to loosen after a while, so I slipped a flat washer between the pipe spacers and the timber the cleat was being mounted to. Problem solved...
    Hope for the best, but plan for the worst.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Quick-Build Cheap Shop Cleats

    By Ironwood I assume you mean Hornbeam?

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Quick-Build Cheap Shop Cleats

    Yes, Hornbeam or Hop Hornbeam is an unknown name here, like hackmatack -- which we call tamarack. Good tough hardwood, doesn't split easily, slow to rot.

    MMD, yes, I have done that too -- forgot this time.

    Dave

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Quick-Build Cheap Shop Cleats

    Interesting. Here Ironwood = hackmatack, but tamarack is totally different - a conifer that loses its needles every year.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Quick-Build Cheap Shop Cleats

    You guys are weird.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Quick-Build Cheap Shop Cleats

    Tamarack=hackmatack=larch=larix lacina.

    Ironwood can be any of many species, in addition to hornbeam.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ironwood
    Steve Martinsen

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Quick-Build Cheap Shop Cleats

    Love hornbeam or hop hornbeam. Tough, stable, machines beautifully...

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Quick-Build Cheap Shop Cleats

    Quote Originally Posted by Garret View Post
    Those work. I dunno about airplanes, but I sure hope you aren't using copper tubing for brake lines on a car! While they may work for a gentle stop, a panic stop will pop them.
    Copper brake pipes are quite normal and approved, they were used for many years until copper became too expensive.
    here's a kit just chosen at random off amazon..
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Trintion-Re...5&tag=mh0a9-21
    Just an amateur bodging away..

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Quick-Build Cheap Shop Cleats

    Quote Originally Posted by The Q View Post
    Copper brake pipes are quite normal and approved, they were used for many years until copper became too expensive.
    here's a kit just chosen at random off amazon..
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Trintion-Re...5&tag=mh0a9-21
    Copper coated steel lines are allowed here, but not plain copper. I have seen cars repaired with standard copper tubing (as one would use for propane, water, or whatever) that have popped from hard brake pressure. Maybe the ones you showed are a special alloy or process that makes them able to stand higher pressure?

    ETA: Maybe the ones you show are nickel-copper? Those (while expensive) are legal.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Quick-Build Cheap Shop Cleats

    The copper brake pipes we use are designed for the purpose, I have some on my Landrover. Their actual copper alloy I don't know, I just get them from a reputable source..
    Just an amateur bodging away..

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Quick-Build Cheap Shop Cleats

    Yes, the wood in my bush here is Ironwood - Ostrya virginiana | The Arboretum (uoguelph.ca)

    It's very good for boat parts, although the tree is not large.

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Quick-Build Cheap Shop Cleats

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Hadfield View Post
    Yes, the wood in my bush here is Ironwood - Ostrya virginiana | The Arboretum (uoguelph.ca)

    It's very good for boat parts, although the tree is not large.
    They do tend to be small. Throw great sparks when cutting with a chain saw too!
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Quick-Build Cheap Shop Cleats

    Quote Originally Posted by Garret View Post
    Copper coated steel lines are allowed here, but not plain copper. I have seen cars repaired with standard copper tubing (as one would use for propane, water, or whatever) that have popped from hard brake pressure. Maybe the ones you showed are a special alloy or process that makes them able to stand higher pressure?

    ETA: Maybe the ones you show are nickel-copper? Those (while expensive) are legal.

    Oh, man. Quad just bought a 66 Beetle... he is learning, QUICKLY, about old cars and bad fixes; like the fuel hose that is pinched between the engine tin and engine rubber. The hose. Rubber hose.

    And, the brakes, with new rubber hoses attached to cylinders that appear to have been on the Titanic.

    He gets to learn all about brake and fuel tubing and how to cut and flare and...

    Also, you lot are fancy. I just screw two lags in, at slight angles, until the threads are buried, then use the shanks to tie off like a cleat. For goofy shop stuff.

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Quick-Build Cheap Shop Cleats

    Quote Originally Posted by The Q View Post
    The copper brake pipes we use are designed for the purpose, I have some on my Landrover. Their actual copper alloy I don't know, I just get them from a reputable source..

    They tend to be Kunifer rather than pure copper.

  17. #17
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    Default Re: Quick-Build Cheap Shop Cleats

    Hop Hornbeam is a broad leaf, deciduous, under story tree. It does not get big.

  18. #18
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    Default Re: Quick-Build Cheap Shop Cleats

    Quote Originally Posted by amish rob View Post
    Oh, man. Quad just bought a ‘66 Beetle... he is learning, QUICKLY, about old cars and bad fixes; like the fuel hose that is pinched between the engine tin and engine rubber. The hose. Rubber hose.

    And, the brakes, with new rubber hoses attached to cylinders that appear to have been on the Titanic.

    He gets to learn all about brake and fuel tubing and how to cut and flare and...

    Also, you lot are fancy. I just screw two lags in, at slight angles, until the threads are buried, then use the shanks to tie off like a cleat. For goofy shop stuff.
    Screws! Instead of 5" nails! You artistic purist, you...

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