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Thread: How long before small engines go electric?

  1. #36
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    Default Re: How long before small engines go electric?

    [QUOTE=David G;6333362]Interesting. Brands?


    Greenworks.

    John Welsford
    An expert is but a beginner with experience.

  2. #37
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    Default Re: How long before small engines go electric?

    I believe that Greenworks makes the Kobalt stuff for Lowes.
    "If you think you are too small to make a difference, try sleeping with a mosquito"

    -Dalai Lama

  3. #38
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    Default Re: How long before small engines go electric?

    Quote Originally Posted by Stiletto View Post
    My son is an electrician, and he tells me that all the younger carpenters on building sites he visits have pretty much all gone cordless, even for largeish things like mitre saws.

    I know that before I retired the only time I got out my corded drill was if I had lots of concrete drilling to do.
    Our truck mechanic son is the same - air driven rattle guns etc have gone the way of the dodo, replaced by cordless. His brand of choice is Makita, he reckons the reliability is far better than DeWalt and Milwaukee in a commercial workshop environment.

    Pete

  4. #39
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    Default Re: How long before small engines go electric?

    well yes. The Electric impact guns and wrenches are just as powerful as the air powered, but without the hoses that always seem to get in the way. I think they are also quieter. SnapOn must be having a fit!
    "If you think you are too small to make a difference, try sleeping with a mosquito"

    -Dalai Lama

  5. #40
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    Default

    We've got a Black & Decker cordless electric mower. It's an older one, with lead-acid batteries, but it will do our yard and both neighbors' yards without breathing hard.

    And I picked up a Milwaukee M18 cordless weed eater. Came with a gonzo M18 battery. If I put it in a drill, I could run it for prolly 8 hours straight.
    You would not enjoy Nietzsche, sir. He is fundamentally unsound. P.G. Wodehouse (Carry On, Jeeves)

  6. #41
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    Default Re: How long before small engines go electric?

    The Electric impact guns and wrenches are just as powerful as the air powered, but without the hoses that always seem to get in the way. I think they are also quieter. SnapOn must be having a fit!
    Air tool are also smaller and lighter, though the hose can be clumsy.

    Of course, tools powered by an electric compressor are using the same energy source as a batery operated tool.

    Kevin
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  7. #42
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    Default Re: How long before small engines go electric?

    Quote Originally Posted by Breakaway View Post
    Air tool are also smaller and lighter, though the hose can be clumsy.

    Of course, tools powered by an electric compressor are using the same energy source as a batery operated tool.

    Kevin
    I'll be hauling my ship for a repaint in a month or so, have a good sized compressor so rather than all the carp associated with dust extraction and power cords, will be buying an air powered sander and wet sanding. More power, less weight, and I'd have to sweep up anyway.

    John Welsford.
    An expert is but a beginner with experience.

  8. #43
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    Default Re: How long before small engines go electric?

    Quote Originally Posted by john welsford View Post
    I'll be hauling my ship for a repaint in a month or so, have a good sized compressor so rather than all the carp associated with dust extraction and power cords, will be buying an air powered sander and wet sanding. More power, less weight, and I'd have to sweep up anyway.

    John Welsford.
    I use a DA air sander a lot in the shop. If you don't already have all your air hose... I've found the very flexible or 'lay-flat' versions are quite worth the premium.
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
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    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  9. #44
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    Default Re: How long before small engines go electric?

    Quote Originally Posted by epoxyboy View Post
    Our truck mechanic son is the same - air driven rattle guns etc have gone the way of the dodo, replaced by cordless. His brand of choice is Makita, he reckons the reliability is far better than DeWalt and Milwaukee in a commercial workshop environment.

    Pete
    For my sins I am occasionally handed a box of power tools and asked to go and fix them. Ryobi or AEG get their brushes checked but otherwise go in the trash, Milwaukee Bosch and DeWalt are better, but not much. I'll spend time on a Makita or Hitachi, and I think I've only ever seen one Festool, and that had only a cord that had been damaged.
    The big box store house brands? I don't even pick them up out of the box. If they don't go, they go.
    A lot of this though has to do with the availability of spares, and Bosch here are dreadful in that respect.

    John Welsford
    An expert is but a beginner with experience.

  10. #45
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    Default Re: How long before small engines go electric?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dan McCosh View Post
    Same could be argued for large engines.
    Toyota announced today that it is phasing out all vehicles that are not 0-emission by 2035. That's only 15 years from now and that is when their very last model will roll off the production line. Meaning most conventional-Dino models will probably be gone within the coming 10 years ... from the largest motor vehicle producer in the world.

    Here, our ferry went full electric last year. It uses 10 minutes to charge between crossings (35 minutes). A fairly large ferry, takes about 140 cars. And the govt has announced that only 0-emission ferries will be allowed to compete for the ferry concessions all around the coast. That's a lot of big engines going electric very soon.

    Times, they are a changing.
    Last edited by lagspiller; 12-03-2020 at 06:14 PM.

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