Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst ... 234 ... LastLast
Results 71 to 105 of 149

Thread: An Ilur in NZ

  1. #71
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Location
    Hansville, Wa., USA
    Posts
    224

    Default Re: An Ilur in NZ

    Looking very good Wayne!! Moving right along. I just filleted around my longitudinal bulkheads today. I'm trying to keep the heat in with 2 small electric ceramic heaters and tarps draped over the boat. Its very awkward working on the interior.

  2. #72
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Hamilton, New Zealand
    Posts
    99

    Default Re: An Ilur in NZ

    good to hear the progress David. I have the opposite problem in that I've been looking foward to some cooler days better suited to painting.

  3. #73
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Bay Area, CA
    Posts
    167

    Default Re: An Ilur in NZ

    Looks fantastic, Wayne!

    James

  4. #74
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Hamilton, New Zealand
    Posts
    99

    Default Re: An Ilur in NZ

    The hull exterior is completed!

    The paint is an NZ brand called Altex and the colour is Kumeu White. It's a sort of off white. It looked warmer againt the timber than the grey I was initially aiming for.
    I think I'll do the interior in this colour also but dulled to reduce the glare.
    The paint is a one pot system to which was added some of their 2k additive which hardens the finish in some chemical fashion and also increases the gloss. The result was some pretty shiney paint that went on very well with the rolling and tipping method and does seem pretty robust for a shiny little daysailing gentleman's dinghy.

    IMG-2325.jpgIMG-2329.jpgIMG-2331.jpgIMG-2326.jpg
    The brightwork is epoxy coated and varnished.

    Since then I've also added the brass rubbing strips which cover tthe keel, stem, either side of the centreboard case and the bilge keels.

    IMG-2350.jpg

    Next stop is making a crade of some sort to rest the hull on when tipped. Ideally this will be pretty robust and have wheels to allow me to finally move the hull from the shed to my skinny covered boatyard beside the garage so as to clear the garage for family use again as once promised.

  5. #75
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Hamilton, New Zealand
    Posts
    99

    Default Re: An Ilur in NZ

    Sails have also arrived.
    These were made by Russell Streckfuss at Storm Bay Sails in Tasmania and appear to be very good work.
    They were done in Oceanus #7 cloth with vertical panel. Russell is familiar with Vivier designs, is very knowledgable and was great to work with. I'd highly recommend him.
    The cloth took a few months to arrive from Europe due to covid woes but the sails were turned around in a few weeks and it's not like I've got any sticks to put them on yet.

    The rig will be a lug sloop and the jib has a roller furler installed.
    IMG-2339.jpg

    The main
    IMG-2343.jpg

    The jib
    IMG-2341.jpg

    Some work has also been done on the rudder assembly with it largely assempled. The rudder blade and centreboard awaits shaping and coating before full assembly.
    A tiller has also been knocked up. Pics to follow when that's largely finished.

  6. #76
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Guerilla Bay, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    258

    Default Re: An Ilur in NZ

    Well done, big steps forward happening here :-) You might want to think about a couple more screws in tht brass strip that runs up the stem - especially where the trailer will bump against it when the boat is fully winched up. You have the sails now - so can't stop - Lol
    BTW my trailer (a Dunbier one) took 5 months to get here - there were lots & lots of covid style excuses/reasons - just mentioning in case you are thinking of buying a new one to stop that beautiful shiny hull finish being scratched.....................
    I'm about to try raising my mast today - listen for splintering timber!

  7. #77
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    North Bend, OR. USA
    Posts
    516

    Default Re: An Ilur in NZ

    Love the detail "spade" look at the top of your brass strip. Nice touch! Did you just do that free-hand?

    Ken
    When the desire to learn is greater than the desire to win, the journey becomes the prize.

  8. #78
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Location
    Hansville, Wa., USA
    Posts
    224

    Default Re: An Ilur in NZ

    Wow, way to go Wayne. What a great job. You have made a beautiful boat.

  9. #79
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Bay Area, CA
    Posts
    167

    Default Re: An Ilur in NZ

    I was also going to chime about the detail at the top of the brass strip. Looks great. If the boat I'm building had a stem, you can bet I'd steal it.

  10. #80
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Posts
    237

    Default Re: An Ilur in NZ

    Ah, yes, I recognize that little brass flourish.
    BTW, Geoff Kerr of Two Daughters Boatworks always does something like that and I copied it from him.

    The hull looks totally fabulous!

  11. #81
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Posts
    237

    Default Re: An Ilur in NZ

    I am excited to see that you have sails for a lug-sloop.
    In the US I am quite sure that Clarisa is so far the only lug-sloop.

  12. #82
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    823

    Default Re: An Ilur in NZ

    Fine job, Wayne. I like the way the plank laps come right forward to the stem. And the brass detail too. Cheers,Ian
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  13. #83
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Norwich,United Kingdom
    Posts
    8,168

    Default Re: An Ilur in NZ

    Very nice paint job,good attention to detail too.

  14. #84
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Hamilton, New Zealand
    Posts
    99

    Default Re: An Ilur in NZ

    Quote Originally Posted by KenStocker View Post
    Love the detail "spade" look at the top of your brass strip. Nice touch! Did you just do that free-hand?

    Ken
    Thanks Ken,
    Firstly a big hat tip to fellow ilur builder Christop -'cmosheh'. The spade tip idea is from his very fine build. After seeing such a lovely flourish on his Ilur Clarissa, I couldn't let my boat's strip end with a simple round off. Thanks Christoph.

    It was marked freehand with a pencil and done with a bench grinder. The square edge of the disc and made the cuts beneath the head of he 'arrow' and the rest was just a flat grind to produce the angled upper edge and some rounding with a file and sandpaper.

  15. #85
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Hamilton, New Zealand
    Posts
    99

    Default Re: An Ilur in NZ

    Quote Originally Posted by cmosheh View Post
    Ah, yes, I recognize that little brass flourish.
    BTW, Geoff Kerr of Two Daughters Boatworks always does something like that and I copied it from him.

    The hull looks totally fabulous!
    Thanks Christoph, It's come out better than I expected.
    You must be tired of seeing so many suspiciously similar elements of your work (boat and kayak!) turn up in a far flung corner of the world. Your build log has been a big help indeed and very inspiring.

    I did wonder about a fluer de lis shape as a nod to the boat's French design.

    Another thought briefly entertained was a Māori motif, like the head of a taiaha (a traditional fighting staff/spear combo) as a bit of a local reference...
    1024px-Détail_d'un_taiaha.jpg

    But after some sketching I came to the conclusion simple was elegant and best.
    Last edited by WayneT; 02-01-2021 at 06:25 PM.

  16. #86
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Hamilton, New Zealand
    Posts
    99

    Default Re: An Ilur in NZ

    The boat has been flipped.

    With a bit of wiggling she's slipped off the frame thanks to the help of a few workmates.
    She's on a cradle I knocked up and the same wheels that were on the strongback have been transplanted to ease the moving and allow me to get her out of the garage more easily.

    First thoughts in the 2 minutes available before I had to head back to work -

    She's larger than I thought this way up. That's a very voluminous hull and she looks good and robust and nicely enfolding for a newbie like me.

    Lots of work ahead sorting some clean-up and further interior work before epoxying and interior paint but I'm very much looking forward to the next steps.

    I've also now got the extra workbench of the strongback for building masts and spars.

    IMG-2395.jpg

    IMG-2398.jpg
    Last edited by WayneT; 02-11-2021 at 07:54 PM.

  17. #87
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Location
    Hansville, Wa., USA
    Posts
    224

    Default Re: An Ilur in NZ

    Way to go Wayne. Congratulations! Yes, the Ilur is quite a boat!!!

  18. #88
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    823

    Default Re: An Ilur in NZ

    Very impressive design and workmanship, Wayne. (Other interesting things in your workshop too!)
    Cheers,
    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 02-11-2021 at 11:13 PM. Reason: layout
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  19. #89
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Guerilla Bay, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    258

    Default Re: An Ilur in NZ

    Looks great Wayne, and yes they often look larger when 1st flipped and then shrink a little when all the fitout is done. My only suggestion is to think through the logical steps of your fitout so that you try to avoid the 'oh bother' moments which lead to undo's before redo's. Good books can help get the sequence right or maybe Francois has already given you the sequence? I'd perhaps start with knees, breasthook and inwale...................

    Good Luck and just imagine the lovely boat when she is complete :-) Regards Neil

  20. #90
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Napier, Hawkes Bay NZ
    Posts
    326

    Default Re: An Ilur in NZ

    Great finish on the hull there Wayne, progressing nicely.
    I would duly like to come and view at some stage and have a chat if that is OK .
    I drive through to the big smoke from Napier on occasion to race on the Gaffers.
    Will PM you.
    Cheers,
    Mike.

  21. #91
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Location
    Providence,RI USA
    Posts
    226

    Default Re: An Ilur in NZ

    Awesome! That is a beautiful finish, and I agree that they look huge when you first turn over.

    She'll take care of you out there!

    I too am glad to see another sloop. This boat just looks right with a bowsprit.

    Mike

  22. #92
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Bolton, Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    153

    Default Re: An Ilur in NZ

    Hi Wayne,

    Your project looks great. I have just started to paint my Beg-Meil and expect to flip it this spring. Can you share any "lessons learned" from flipping your hull. I would imagine our weights are similar. Did you do it with lots of manpower or lifting fixtures/tools? I'm also trying to decide whether to buy a trailer before I flip or build a cradle as you have done.

    Good luck and thanks for all the photos.

    Dean

  23. #93
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Hamilton, New Zealand
    Posts
    99

    Default Re: An Ilur in NZ

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike1902 View Post
    Great finish on the hull there Wayne, progressing nicely.
    I would duly like to come and view at some stage and have a chat if that is OK .
    I drive through to the big smoke from Napier on occasion to race on the Gaffers.
    Will PM you.
    Cheers,
    Mike.
    Hi Mike,
    You'd be very welcome as there's likely to be plenty I could pick your brains on. Drop me a line.

  24. #94
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Hamilton, New Zealand
    Posts
    99

    Default Re: An Ilur in NZ

    Quote Originally Posted by IanMilne View Post
    Very impressive design and workmanship, Wayne. (Other interesting things in your workshop too!)
    Cheers,
    Ian

    Ian, thanks for that.
    They were the projects done in the lead-up that convinced me that maybe I could build a proper boat if I tried hard enough.
    I spied Kotik's launch pic in a copy of Wooden Boat while on holiday. A lovely pic of a lovely boat.

  25. #95
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Hamilton, New Zealand
    Posts
    99

    Default Re: An Ilur in NZ

    Quote Originally Posted by DeanP View Post
    Hi Wayne,

    Your project looks great. I have just started to paint my Beg-Meil and expect to flip it this spring. Can you share any "lessons learned" from flipping your hull. I would imagine our weights are similar. Did you do it with lots of manpower or lifting fixtures/tools? I'm also trying to decide whether to buy a trailer before I flip or build a cradle as you have done.

    Good luck and thanks for all the photos.

    Dean
    Hi Dean, Thanks for the kind words. I looked at Beg Meil for a long time but went with an ilur for a simpler rig (for a novice) and a little more flexibility with the interior for cruising but I still love the idea...

    From memory I think there were a few differences in frame locations as per the ilur kit but overall I suspect it'll go the same.
    Make sure you take any positioning bolts out if applicable. I had placed one of the bow end ones in with the hex end facing forward and hence couldn't get it out post-planking until I cut the end off with a grinder. Doh.
    The temp frames got a tap with a mallet to foil any last attempt by the epoxy hold on to the barrier tape etc.
    For the lifting I had myself and four helpers, no mechanical aids or ropes and winches etc for the reason I don't have any gantry or exposed beams to use as one.
    Two people on each end and myself in the middle to guide it up and then to help catch it as we rotated.
    Given the slotting nature of the kit it took a couple of lift attempts to get it rising evenly to come free of the frames but nothing that was too difficult.

    I wanted to get a trailer first but due to a combination of factors including specific dimensions I need on a custom trailer and then running out of boat money as Christmas arrived, I've gone without one at this point.
    The roughly 1mx1m cradle was knocked up out of the cheapest timber I could find with old carpet as a cushion.
    It's a square with uprights holding a bunk on each side and was knocked up before the hull was flipped to get a decent position and balance.
    I've also got a little stand made for another purpose that can sit under the keel at either end when I'm working from the interior to stop it tipping forward or backward.
    I expect a trailer will now be one of the last things I get as the boat is stable as well as being nice and compact at present without one. Wheels mean I can roll it onto the driveway for messy tasks and also stash the boat in it's final covered-in home behind the garage if it's going to sit for any length of time without much work. The family also wants their garage back too.

  26. #96
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Hamilton, New Zealand
    Posts
    99

    Default Re: An Ilur in NZ

    Work continues on the glamorous interior seat and floor battens and the like.

    A note here that might be of use to future builders.
    The half floors toward the aft end of the centreboard case had a slight issue. They fit fine into the profile of the planks but the shape at the join with the centreboard case seemed about 6-10mm too high.
    Note on the pic where I've filled the resulting gap with a ply shim and epoxy.
    IMG-2455.jpg

    IMG-2456.jpg

    There's a couple of possible answers for this - I have got the height of the centreboard case wrong somehow or the piece was just cut with it's top edges too high.
    Without checking with the designer I think it's the latter as the floor profile fitted perfectly and there's little way to get the kit centreboard case wrong as it slots into bulkheads and is made of precut parts.
    Also, the top edge of the half floor piece was the same measurement higher than all the other half floors, meaning it was the only one higher and hence seems unlikely to be intentional. An oar laying across these pieces in the bilge storage slot would be resting on one high point. The hole is also a different shape to the presumably centreboard bungee anchor point ingeniously cut into the one at the CB pivot point so I don;t think it's intentional.

    I checked with David of Ilur in Hansville fame and his all seemed to be level so I've filled the hole and trimmed the top edge of the piece to level it with the others. Not a major drama.


    Here's progress to date.

    IMG-2457.jpg

    I'll be sourcing floorboards soon.

    I have a sample of Lawson's cypress, AKA Port Orford cypress, from the mill where I got the macrocarpa used for some internals. It seems nice to work, a decent weight although not massively hard of course but strong and looks good and I suspect could be fairly durable. It was described as mac "but clearer and better for boats'.

    That's a likely option.

  27. #97
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Location
    Hansville, Wa., USA
    Posts
    224

    Default Re: An Ilur in NZ

    Looking really good Wayne. After thinking more about the half bulkheads, I think I worked down the plank side so that the top side fit the CB logs better. You worked it out though. I’m starting to fit my floor boards. I had 5/8” cedar provided, and I’m finding that it is way to bendy. I either have to add a whole lot of support structure or get some other type of wood that’s stronger. Vivier calls for using Red Pine, Doug Fir, or Mahogany.

  28. #98
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Hamilton, New Zealand
    Posts
    99

    Default Re: An Ilur in NZ

    Quote Originally Posted by davidladd View Post
    Looking really good Wayne. After thinking more about the half bulkheads, I think I worked down the plank side so that the top side fit the CB logs better. You worked it out though. I’m starting to fit my floor boards. I had 5/8” cedar provided, and I’m finding that it is way to bendy. I either have to add a whole lot of support structure or get some other type of wood that’s stronger. Vivier calls for using Red Pine, Doug Fir, or Mahogany.
    Yes, I noticed your extra floor supports. After a little wandering about in the boat using some scrap ply for flooring I'm seeing the use of spanning the centre of the gap in the footwell either side of the keel aft of the CB case as you've done. It's a small job that could give some piece of mind.

  29. #99
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Napier, Hawkes Bay NZ
    Posts
    326

    Default Re: An Ilur in NZ

    Hi Wayne,
    Interesting to note that the infill piece is about the same size as the limber hole.
    CNC machine may have become a little confused.

  30. #100
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Location
    Hansville, Wa., USA
    Posts
    224

    Default Re: An Ilur in NZ

    Hi Wayne, I seem to be floundering around and not getting much done. I started to fit the floor boards that came with the lumber kit. I received tight knit cedar. But, because the planks are limited to 5/8” thick to match the slants side boards the 5/8” boards are so bendy I couldn’t believe it. I didn’t know how I could use them, but after some exhaustive looking for some other material there just isn’t much else I can use unless I want to spend lots of money. So, I am adding additional floor board supports between the extra support a already added and I am making a whole rack of supports in the mid section. I’ll post pics when I get them done. This is the only way i can keep the floor boards from feeling mushy.

  31. #101
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Hamilton, New Zealand
    Posts
    99

    Default Re: An Ilur in NZ

    Attention has turned to the gunwales.

    I've got just enough sapele to get these done as long as I don't botch it. A long board was ripped down to 1/2 x 3/4" strips.

    Three of these laminated on each each side make up the gunwales with the outer one featuring a rebate that encloses the exposed ply of the upper strake.

    IMG-2464.jpg

    IMG-2466.jpg

    The board wasn't long enough for the whole length so scarfs joints were needed. Due to some lack of planning and limited timber quantities these ended up exactly on some visiing faces but actually turned out a little less obtrusive visually than the vertical line of the other face of the joint.

    IMG-2532.jpg

    First strip clamped on. The already varnished upper strake was masked off prior to glueing (plus screws). I'd learned my lesson by marking the upper transom with a stray rag dipped in acetone. A revarnish awaits once this lot is complete and tidied up.

    IMG-2470.jpg

    Some of the compound joints at the stern were a bit fiddly. I managed to cut one about 4mm too short. It's the sort of thing that'll vex me for years to come if left so I laminated some extra on and surprisingly the joint all but disappeared after some sanding.

    IMG-2471.jpg

    Still a few days of careful measuring, cutting and placement before these are done and then it'll be on to making the the centreboard case presentable.

  32. #102
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Hamilton, New Zealand
    Posts
    99

    Default Re: An Ilur in NZ

    This was also a good point in the build to get rid of some of my growing pile of ply scraps, offcuts and plane shavings. They joined last year's Christmas tree in an autumn evening's offering to the fire gods.
    The building strongback will remain until masts,spars and oars are done. Even then I might disassemble it and store it for future projects. It's a useful long bench.

    IMG-2524.jpg

  33. #103
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Guerilla Bay, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    258

    Default Re: An Ilur in NZ

    Looks like lovely work and that gunwale will sing when varnished. I have a rule that I cut to size after the glue has set if I possibly can, though sometimes the trim is unavoidable.....................
    We're starting to experience autumn here and I have the rubbish bin full of offcuts to use as kindling on our wood fire which is our primary heating in the house.

    Keep up with the photos please.

    And yes, never dispose of strongbacks :-)

  34. #104
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Bay Area, CA
    Posts
    167

    Default Re: An Ilur in NZ

    Wayne, it looks just great. I wonder if you'd take a minute to share your thoughts on working from the CNC kit. I've just gotten bids for the cutting on my Seil project. I find that the cost of the CNC work will be about twice the cost of the plywood for the hull and strongback. I'm sure it's a reasonable price but I'm a sordid pinchpenny and balk at the cost, particularly when I could use the mylar templates I already have. Your clean, fast build would seem to make a good case for CNC. How did you feel about it?

    James

  35. #105
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Hamilton, New Zealand
    Posts
    99

    Default Re: An Ilur in NZ

    Hi James,
    I love the CNC kit. I'm sure I could do the build without it but I suspect I'd still be at the stage of still cutting and installing planks now, instead of where I am.

    If you have the time and space, building from the plans/patterns would be fine. I have limited space to store ply sheets and am building in the garage that the rest of the family wants back at some point so I needed to be realistic about keeping some momentum going and the kit has done that well. The strongback in the kit building system for the ilur that is easily mounted on wheels was a big factor too.

    The thought of cutting out all those planks/ scarfing ply and getting a reasonable fit is certainly achievable but wasn't the aspect of boatbuilding I find most enjoyable (Stone me for a boatbuilding heretic!). There's still plenty of raw timber to be milled into interesting things.

    I did balk at the cost of the CNC cutting given the starting cost of the build was the part I needed to keep reasonable.
    However, the US$400 equivalent I paid here seems small in hindsight now over the likely 2 years of the build and overall cost. To be fair it was a bit of an off the radar job by someone whose main work is not CNC but has a machine and as a result was about half the price of on-the-books quotes from others.

    Like all things, the cost is soon forgotten while the memory of the quality (and speed) of the build remains. Whether that difference in cost given the price differential you are working with is something you can justify is up to you and may well depend on different factors to the ones I was looking at.

    Jason's very high end Beg Meil build with patterns is an example I looked at often when tossing up whether to go kit or patterns. I don't regret CNC and would do it again if available but would also happily work from mylar for the right boat.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •