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Thread: The Birth of the Night Heron

  1. #351
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Berlin, Germany
    Posts
    808

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    What a small world we live in !
    Plattdütsch or Low German has virtually frizzled away, although it is an official language and I heard a member of the parliament insisting on holding her speeches in the house in Platt. My grandparents spoke a mixture of Platt and standard German called "Missingsch"* and I can read the works of Fritz Reuter without having to look up too much vocabulary as a result .
    So you were able to sail in East Berlin? In spite of re-unification, we rarely go that way, as we live in the North and our boats are on the Tegeler See.
    Looking foreward to reading of Blue Heron's adventures with you!

    Cheers,
    Gernot H.

    *https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Missingsch
    Last edited by 62816inBerlin; 05-25-2021 at 05:23 PM. Reason: wiki reference added.

  2. #352
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    345

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    [QUOTE=62816inBerlin;6456803]What a small world we live in !
    Plattdütsch or Low German has virtually frizzled away, although it is an official language and I heard a member of the parliament insisting on holding her speeches in the house in Platt. My grandparents spoke a mixture of Platt and standard German called "Missingsch"* and I can read the works of Fritz Reuter without having to look up too much vocabulary as a result .
    So you were able to sail in East Berlin? In spite of re-unification, we rarely go that way, as we live in the North and our boats are on the Tegeler See.
    Looking foreward to reading of Blue Heron's adventures with you!

    Cheers,
    Gernot H.


    Kleine welt, Gernot, wir sind jeden tag überrascht.

    Fritz Reuter - wow! We have a statue if him in Humbolt Park, Chicago. Not many people, including Germans, read him now. He was, we've read, a considerable contributor to the Low German language. His farm series was very popular in England back in the 1870s and in Chicago in the early 1900s! His works were even translated to Hochdeutsch too.
    Fritz Reuter.jpg

    The Großer Müggelsee-
    To make a long story short - in the summer of 1998 my Dad and I went to Berlin to see what all "die aufregung" after reunification was all about after we found one of Mom's second cousins (who lived with Mom, prewar, for many years) living on the other side of the wall in Müggelsee Strand. We found out that they lived as well as Germans in West Berlin. They also had a dinghy her husband built from photographs of a Uffa Fox designed, International 14 Dinghy, Albacore. We were rag sailors then so we took her out for a few hours sail under light winds; this experience was like an ingot of pure gold in our treasure chest of memories.

    We're surprised you've never sailed the Müggelsee - it's only about a 1 1/2 to 2 hour drive from your location in the Northwest. Anyway. . .

    Bleib dran fur mehr, or in English, stay tuned for more updates.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  3. #353
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Berlin, Germany
    Posts
    808

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Thanks for the update! I think your family is probably as cosmopolitan as ours is.
    I only came to Berln from Trinidad to avoid being drafted, but the city fits me like a well-worn shoe now, and the kids and grandchildren are all in the town.
    It's odd that years ago I stumbled across the Mirror Dinghy Forum started by Peter Kaiser of Ontario, who left Berlin with his parents in the 1930s for reasons that are all to obvious. Pete and I have managed to rescue the forum and have become good friends. This is where the WWW has its positive sides.
    Now on to the adventures of Night Heron!
    Cheers,
    Gernot H.

  4. #354
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    345

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Sunday, 30 March 2021
    Weekly Build Update

    Hello Everyone,
    It was a very good week on the Sun Coast although the heat was almost unbearable in the late afternoons. . . humidity was acceptable and we were able to concentrate on building the framework for the cabin's berth.

    In light of Memorial Day celebrated this weekend in the United States; we'd like to quote something that binds many of us around the world:

    "This story shall the man teach his son;
    and Crispin Crispian shall never go by,
    From this day to the ending of the world,
    But we in it shall be remembered;
    We few, we happy few, we band of brothers,
    For he today that sheds his blood with me
    Shall be my brother; be he never so vile,
    This day shall gentle his condition:
    And gentlemen in England now abed
    Shall think themselves accursed they were not here,
    And hold their manhoods cheap whiles any speaks
    That fought with us upon Saint Crispin's day."
    King Henry V
    (To his troops prior to the Battle of Agincourt)

    And now our efforts for the week:

    The I Beams
    I Beams.jpg
    1 - The berth's mattress was finished by the better half - it's pretty comfortable as we can attest - we snoozed on it, placed on the hard terrazzo floor, for about two hours after our very needed shower after Monday's tasks;
    2 - Early Monday saw us measuring and subsequently starting to cutting the first "I" beams for the framework that holds the berth atop the sole. The beams are made from 3/8" (10mm) thick White Oak as we did not want to have any flexing of the structure;
    3 - The flanges and the web were mechanically stapled together with s/s brads, epoxied and clamped overnight, and:
    4 - One of the finished I beams ready for finishing with penetrating epoxy and topside paint.

    The Saddles
    Saddles.jpg
    1 - The I beams for frames 4 and 5 required saddles as we want to be able to remove them at will; the water tank and pump will be directly below and between these two frames;
    2 - The saddles are multiple angled pieces as the slope of the frames is athwartships and down and angled astern on the horizontal plane. To make the saddle's seat couple correctly to the I beam's bottom flange, multiple over the coaming trips to check angles, for three days, wore us out at the end of the day, for three days;
    3 - The saddles finished and fitted to the beams, and:
    4 - Laid out, the saddles and I beams, ready for mounting, don't seem like they took four days to make. . . so on Friday, the effort to mount them started.

    Berth Assembly & Never Forget
    Berth Assembly & Never Forget.jpg
    1 - We finished mounting the port side mattress rail (top arrow) and mounted the saddles (center arrows) on frames 4 and 5. The I beams were all mounted starting from the bow, of course - a task that took all of Friday and Saturday. The bottom arrow shows where the water tank and pump will be located;
    2 - One of the three plywood sheets cut to the shape of starboard mattress rail. These sheets will be fiber-glassed and made as smooth as we can make them so as to have a safe, secure and cozy sleeping/rest environment, and last but not least:
    3 - Never forget. . . we owe them for the freedom we enjoy.

    That was it, a week of White Oak sawdust - hope you all had a fruitful a week too.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  5. #355
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    345

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Sunday, 6 June 2021
    Weekly Build Update

    Hello Everyone,

    Hot, humid, rainy and soggy days made for a low output this week as we determined to finish the berth's three panels we cut the week before. . . but failed to finish them.

    We also ran out of our favorite epoxy as our original plan to only fiberglass one side of the three panels changed when the modulus of elasticity, or simply put - panel deflection - was not to our liking as we want a stiffer base for the mattress.

    As many of you may recall, we're using scrap panels (used for patterns) and leftovers of the wood we still have in our "wood heap" to make the berth's frame and top panels. So, we decided to fiberglass both sides of the panels with two layers of 6 oz cloth that we have that cost us a shot of Jack Daniel's. [A gift from our neighbor, Stan, who "cleaned out" his garage.]

    Here is what we did this week. . .

    Fiberglassing Berth Panels
    Berth Panels Fiberglassed.jpg
    1 - This photo shows the port side panel fiberglassed and drying over three plastic buckets - two hours later we had to transfer it (sticky and messy task!) to the Lanai as raindrops signaled that a downpour was imminent;
    2 - Here is the starboard panel that suffered the same fate as the port;
    3 - The three piece, patched, center panel is shown here assembled and covered with plastic buckets that served two purposes - apply pressure to the fiberglass 6 inch (15cm) wide tape on the butt joints and prevent the feathered one from landing on the wet epoxy, and:
    4 - "Next day photo" - the process of cleaning and sanding the edges of the two panels (oh, how itchy it was!) by hand to prevent releasing too many airborne fiberglass cloth particles. Yes, we used plastic gloves, a repurposed C-19 face mask, long sleeved T shirt and a hat in 90° F plus (32° C) heat in high humidity.

    The Center Panel, Berth and Other Tasks
    Panels Berth Pump Engine.jpg
    1 - The center panel that was assembled from three pieces was not finished as we ran out of epoxy! Duh! and so it goes;
    2 - We put the unfinished panels on the framework of the berth for two purposes - one, to see "fit" and second, to have them in a secure and safe environment where rain and dirt can't get to them;
    3 - Under the tarp, rain drops free from the drizzle outside, we were able to do the final plumbing by installing the water pump and tank. It all works and nothing leaked - a positive event we took as a small victory in an otherwise error prone week, and:
    4 - Mercury makes the best outboards (in our opinion) but, the engine sputtered and died on a number of occasions when we did a run down to Port Charlotte Bay. So much for the best outboards. . . after a few hours of trouble shooting we found the issue - the fuel solenoid (arrow) that was sticking and "clicking" causing fuel starvation. We tried cleaning it but that didn't work so we ordered a new one.

    The Outdoors No Shop, Shop
    Yard Shop Dinner.jpg
    1- This photo shows our "Outdoors No Shop, Shop" in it's heyday where all the cutting, sanding, finishing of parts and assemblies was conducted, weather permitting;
    2 - The shop no longer exists to the delight of the better half who felt we had "gone Appalachia" [a severely depressed region that spans 13 states in the US and where many house lawns/backyards are filled with junk] with the mess and activity we had going on for 14 months! We now have to deal with the "wood heap" that we plan on tackling next week;
    3 - A reward for dismantling the "no shop" and promising to begin landscaping was the better half's contribution to our shipwright effort. That's all homemade grub - short ribs, mac and extra cheese, coleslaw and a very stout dark beer, and:
    4 - Whats a meal without dessert(?) in this case rice pudding and a tall Cappuccino! Well, maybe the week was a mess, but the Saturday dinner was a spectacular favorite.

    This coming week we hope to wrap up the berth build and make the call to the Florida authorities for our inspection and subsequent registration!

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  6. #356
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    South Patrick Shores, USA
    Posts
    777

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by Kapiteinterzee View Post
    Sunday, 6 June 2021

    Weekly Build Update



    Hello Everyone,

    Hot, humid, rainy and soggy days made for a low output this week as we determined to finish the berth's three panels we cut the week before. . . but failed to finish them.

    The Outdoors No Shop, Shop

    Yard Shop Dinner.jpg

    1- This photo shows our "Outdoors No Shop, Shop" in it's heyday where all the cutting, sanding, finishing of parts and assemblies was conducted, weather permitting;

    2 - The shop no longer exists to the delight of the better half who felt we had "gone Appalachia" [a severely depressed region that spans 13 states in the US and where many house lawns/backyards are filled with junk] with the mess and activity we had going on for 14 months! We now have to deal with the "wood heap" that we plan on tackling next week;

    3 - A reward for dismantling the "no shop" and promising to begin landscaping was the better half's contribution to our shipwright effort. That's all homemade grub - short ribs, mac and extra cheese, coleslaw and a very stout dark beer, and:

    4 - Whats a meal without dessert(?) in this case rice pudding and a tall Cappuccino! Well, maybe the week was a mess, but the Saturday dinner was a spectacular favorite.

    This coming week we hope to wrap up the berth build and make the call to the Florida authorities for our inspection and subsequent registration!

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.


    This reminds me to be thankful for that half of a garage I call a shop! But the outdoors no-shop, shop certainly has some benefits upon its demise.

    I'm also looking forward to your authority engagement. Some time sooner or later I'll need to do the same, hoping to learn a bit here.

    Congratulations and thanks!

    Eric
    “Retiring feels like death of self, but I'm looking forward to the rebirth - The opportunity to re-imagine my purpose.”

    Michael Bennett

  7. #357
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    345

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by FishoutaFlorida View Post
    This reminds me to be thankful for that half of a garage I call a shop! But the outdoors no-shop, shop certainly has some benefits upon its demise.

    I'm also looking forward to your authority engagement. Some time sooner or later I'll need to do the same, hoping to learn a bit here.

    Congratulations and thanks!

    Eric
    Hello Eric,

    Yeap, now you know what a tremendous benefit you have with your "Half Garage Shop."

    Our "Vessel Inspection" was due today but after waiting almost all day - we got a phone call at 1600 hours rescheduling us for tomorrow, Thursday, June 10th.

    Anyway. . . here is the procedure for inspecting the build so that you can apply for registration with the Department of Motor Vehicles. It took all day Tuesday to prepare this document, hope it helps you and anyone who might be at this stage of the build:

    The Face Tab - Hull
    Hull Tab.jpg

    The Second Tab - Deck & Rigging
    Deck & Rigging Tab.jpg

    The Third Tab - Machinery & Engines
    Machinery & Engines Tab.jpg

    The Photos Tab
    Photographs Tab.jpg

    "The Finished Product"
    Finished Product.jpg

    We guess all those years of preparing reports for "Corporate" paid off. . . hummmmmm.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  8. #358
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    South Patrick Shores, USA
    Posts
    777

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Greetings Joe,

    Thanks for the info! I really appreciate you sharing your document. It looks like I may not need an inspection, just the forms, being a 14' vessel.

    From the FDMV website on "Vessel Titling and Registrations"

    Homemade Vessels

    An initial application for the title and registration of a homemade vessel is filed at the office of the county tax collector or license plate agent. If the homemade vessel is less than 16 feet in length forms HSMV 82040 and HSMV 87002 must be presented along with a $5.25 titling fee (for electronic title) or $7.75 (for paper title) or $11 (expedited (fast) title). A registration fee based on the length of the vessel and any applicable sales tax must also be paid.
    If the homemade vessel is 16 feet or more in length, a physical inspection of the vessel by a member of the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) must be conducted. FWC may be contacted through their website at www.myfwc.com. At the time of inspection, a completed form HSMV 87002, Vessel Statement of Builder, must be submitted to the inspecting officer. Upon satisfactory completion of the inspection, the inspecting officer will provide a completed Certificate of Inspection, FWC/DLE-126, which will be submitted to the county tax collector or license plate agent along with forms HSMV 82040 and HSMV 87002 and a $5.25 titling fee (for electronic title) or $7.75 (for paper title) or $11 (expedited (fast) title). A registration fee based on the length of the vessel and any applicable sales tax must also be paid.

    Now I've got a "go to" to help me get going once I've finished her up. I'm still working on the bathroom remodel that my brother in law and I started a couple of weeks ago. So boat building is again taking a back seat. I'm not sure that remodeling in on my lengthy list of attributes

    Good luck with your inspection today, but I don't really think that luck is required. You've built a beautiful, seaworthy boat!

    Thanks again!

    Eric
    Last edited by FishoutaFlorida; 06-10-2021 at 07:29 AM.
    “Retiring feels like death of self, but I'm looking forward to the rebirth - The opportunity to re-imagine my purpose.”

    Michael Bennett

  9. #359
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    345

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by FishoutaFlorida View Post

    Greetings Joe,

    Thanks for the info! I really appreciate you sharing your document. It looks like I may not need an inspection, just the forms, being a 14' vessel.

    Now I've got a "go to" to help me get going once I've finished her up. I'm still working on the bathroom remodel that my brother in law and I started a couple of weeks ago. So boat building is again taking a back seat. I'm not sure that remodeling in on my lengthy list of attributes


    Good luck with your inspection today, but I don't really think that luck is required. You've built a beautiful, seaworthy boat!

    Thanks again!

    Eric
    ------------------------------------------------------------------

    Hello again Eric,
    Well, here is the registration process in living black and white. . .

    1. We completed form HSMV 87002, "Vessel Statement of Builder" and gave them (there were 2 Officers) the package we'd prepared and posted here;
    2. The Inspecting Officer provided a completed "Certificate of Inspection", FWC/DLE-126, after they inspected Night Heron, and:
    3. We downloaded form HSMV 82040,
    "Application for Certificate of Title With/Without Registration" after filling it on-line.

    Armed with these three forms we drove over to the Venice (Florida) Tax Collector's Office and sat for an hour. . .

    Then, in a few minutes after we sat down with a very nice public service lady, and $110 (USC) lighter, we had our Title, Registration, Hull Number, Boat Registration Numbers and a sticker for 2 years. [1 year registration would've been cheaper.]

    The better half insisted we stop and have Chinese for as a reward for submitting her to the torture of having to sit there in heat and humidity with an inefficient A/C!

    Here is the sticker we have to display on the port side of the bow after the 3" high
    Registration Numbers and the Certificate of Inspection Officer Johnson provided.
    CERTIFICATE OF INSPECTION.jpg
    BTW - Officer Johnson, who inspected Night Heron, remarked that "this boat is among the top five we've ever inspected
    in this county since we started 10 years ago." He also applauded the quality and accuracy of the documentation we submitted with form HSMV 87002.

    Needless to say. . . we were ecstatic.

    Hope this helps the forum cohort located in Florida.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.

    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  10. #360
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    SW Washington/ At Sea
    Posts
    481

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    good work! that is awesome.

  11. #361
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    345

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Sunday, 13 June 2021
    Weekly Build Update

    Hello Everyone,

    What a week! The build suffered a bit of a delay, but the effort to get inspected and registered paid off albeit at an investment of four full days.

    Preparing paperwork and dealing with officials of the FWCC, who by the way, are just excellent enforcement officers(!) and the dreaded DMV made for some anxiety.

    Anyway. . . here is what happened in our "neck of the woods" [or is it our stretch of the beach?]. . .

    Four Days & Friday
    Four Days & Friday.jpg
    1 - We called the FWCC on Monday morning and was told by the dispatcher that we would be contacted by an inspection officer of the Law Enforcement Division. The Officer called a few hours later and advised that our inspection was set for Wednesday. He gave us instructions that besides the inspection request form, we also needed photographs of the build from the start to the present showing yours truly at work on the build. He stressed that all the receipts be "official" from the suppliers we used to build the boat. Needless to say, we shifted into "full steam ahead" and started preparing the 50 page document that took 2 full days to prepare as detailed in post #357;
    2 - 4 Days later we were officially inspected and registered - in the process, we lost Wednesday to waiting as they called on Wednesday afternoon to reschedule us to Thursday;
    3 - First thing Friday morning we installed the fuel solenoid valve on the Merc we'd received on Thursday, mid-day; a 15 minute easy task to eliminate the issue of fuel starvation, and:
    4 - We tackled the "wood heap" right after that as we'd promised to tidy up the Lanai's picture window wall this week.

    Friday
    Friday.jpg
    1 - The wood heap was sorted with the intent of "saving the good stuff" and cutting into small pieces the wood that no longer was usable. It took 3 hours to sort and cut the heap that required 2 large paper recycling bags;
    2 - We piled the good wood pieces we plan on using to make various ditties and doodads such as a binocular cradle, water bottle holders, cell phone nests, etc. Our policy is no plastic as far as we can avoid it if it can be made from wood;
    3 - The orderly stacking of the remaining wood awaiting a tarp sized to cover it neatly, and:
    4 - A general view of the Lanai window wall as of Friday afternoon. . . the white box is the cover for the electric launching/retrieving winch.

    Saturday Morning
    Saturday Morning.jpg
    1 - All that occurred Saturday - thanks to a mid-morning shower - was the trimming of the fiberglass cloth of the berth's center panel. We managed to epoxy it Friday between solenoid replacement and wood sorting and cutting tasks, and:
    2 - The berth's center panel sanded and shortly thereafter placed inside the cabin under a rain shower, luckily, no harm came of it.

    That was our week. . . this week we plan on finishing the berth and other minute tasks so that we can take you guys and gals on short cruise to wrap up this thread.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  12. #362
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    345

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by Powerwagon View Post

    good work! that is awesome.
    Hello Powerwagon,

    Thank you for your accolade. . . and many thanks for being with us since the beginning.

    It's gonna be difficult to "let go" and say "bon voyage" to all the folks we've exchanged posts with, who, like you, have commented and/or submitted good ideas.

    As for this week - wet weather has delayed our
    activities quite a bit, so 2 more weeks looks like the finale. Stay tuned. . .

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.

    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  13. #363
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    South Patrick Shores, USA
    Posts
    777

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by Kapiteinterzee View Post
    Our policy is no plastic as far as we can avoid it if it can be made from wood;
    Can't wait to hear about your cruise and see some of the sights!
    “Retiring feels like death of self, but I'm looking forward to the rebirth - The opportunity to re-imagine my purpose.”

    Michael Bennett

  14. #364
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    345

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by FishoutaFlorida View Post

    Can't wait to hear about your cruise and see some of the sights!
    Hello Eric,

    Yes, it won't be long now. . . got back to the dock about 2 hours ago after launching Night Heron to test the new fuel solenoid we changed on the Mercury last week. The engine ran nicely and strong. Rain made this week one of misery and little accomplishments so we needed a taste of river water.

    Here is a sampling of what's in store for our final post a week or so away, enjoy!

    A "Drive-by" After Launching
    Saturday Driveby.jpg
    The Better Half took these as we unfurled our Ensign and pointed Night Heron towards the Myakka. . .

    The Myakka at 22 Knots
    Myakka at 22 Knots.jpg
    We had a wonderful cruise down the Myakka to Port Charlotte Bay and back. We also used our old Garmin Automobile GPS to gauge top and average speed, time on the water and distance traveled. That old GPS also showed the outline of the Myakka River and Port Charlotte Bay as if it were a marine unit! BTW, we don't plan on equipping Night Heron with a marine GPS - who can get lost around here(?) and besides, piloting is something we enjoy and practice often with downloaded charts from the net. So, we'll continue to use our old GPS to give us the information we need to chart engine rpm's as it translates to speed over the water.

    That's what we did this Saturday. . . hope you had a good Saturday too! Our weekly update will publish tomorrow, Sunday, as is customary.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  15. #365
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    345

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Sunday, 13 June 2021
    Weekly Build Update

    Hello Everyone,

    We should call the Sun Coast, the Rain Coast this last week! Monday through Wednesday was a washout and it wasn't until Thursday that we had a dry day although it was very hot and humid. So the results were way less than anticipated. . .

    Latches
    Latches.jpg
    1 - The cabin access doors now have latches that we flush mounted by cutting the door's top rail so as to have the latch body snug in the corner. This task required taking off the doors and using a wood chisel, carefully removing the end of the top rail to the surface of the panel;
    2 - The catch for the doors were raised to the thickness of the doors using a furniture leg floor pad the better half had in her ditty bag;
    3 - The hatch doors under the transom seats were also provided with smaller latches similar in design to the cabin's. We removed the doors and using a small chisel - we carved out a notch at the center so as to have an interior, not visible catch, and;
    4 - A view of the notch and the s/s plate held in place by two s/s screws.

    Registration & Hull Numbers
    Registration Numbers.jpg
    1 - Mid-day Thursday's snail mail delivered the Hull ID and Florida Registration Numbers ready to mount; we jumped on them faster than a pre-marriage obstinate groom on wedding night - and under the watchful eye of the build's owner we proceeded to attach them;
    2 - The starboard bow showing the "finished product" - after a lot of measuring, finagling and stepping back to see if there was any way to make this ugly attachment less objectionable. Letters by law must be 3 inches (75mm) high! Jeez!. . .
    3 - The port bow being subjected to a visual deflowering of design with the added distaste of an orange sticker to boot! The owner of the build made sure we did the job correctly, and:
    4 - The port bow showing the registration number and the ugly orange sticker.

    Rug and Cockpit View
    Rug and Cockpit Views.jpg
    1 - This weeks anecdote: The Old Guy - "What's up with the rolled up area rug?" Better half replied - "The Goodwill people will have this on their floor today." The Old Guy - "Goodwill will have to wait. . . we need that puppy for the cuddy cabin." Better Half - "Good, then you'll foot the bill for a new one as this thing was never my favorite." After that we found ourselves inside the cuddy cabin with a rug that had to be cut to make it fit. Here it is under the Pergola ready to be cut;
    2 - The rug after the first cut. . . it'll be finished this coming week as we wrap up the build - weather permitting of course;
    3 - The finished cockpit view looking forward from the transom, and:
    4 - A top view of the cockpit - the photo was taken at low low tide from the dock.

    Ensign and Flagstaff
    Ensign and Flagstaff.jpg
    1 - We drilled a 3 inch (75mm) deep hole through the transom cap rail into the transom plank and made a white oak top "holding pad" to hold the Ensign flagstaff;
    2 - The curtain rod inside the spare room closet had nowhere to go. . . so we drafted it to serve a more noble cause;
    3 - After an hour on the table belt sander and a number of body angles to attain the proper taper. . . the pauper in the closet became the king of the transom;
    4 - The Ensign and the finished staff in their rightful place, and:
    5 - The Ensign and the Night Heron. . .

    Yesterday's posting in reply to FishoutaFlorida, we demonstrated how we spent, or was it invested, our Saturday. . . ah, yes, it has been a tough week.

    Stay safe stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  16. #366
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    Mosier Oregon
    Posts
    52

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    So Great!

    It did feel strange putting the license sticker on my fresh paint job!

    Nice work.

    -Derek

  17. #367
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    345

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by Liberty53 View Post
    So Great!

    It did feel strange putting the license sticker on my fresh paint job!

    Nice work.

    -Derek
    Hello Derek,
    Welcome aboard. . . thanks for your note - it's always appreciated.

    As for the Registration Numbers - The fresh paint job on the hull you describe is a part of the issue for us, especially as we had to do it twice!

    We know it's the law, but we take exception to the aesthetics of the location; here is the bow of the Night Heron without the ugliness and with the nastiness:

    Before
    Before Reg Numbers.jpg

    After
    After Reg Numbers.jpg

    It would have been a great idea to have these numbers on plaques and on display from amidships only when the boat is underway.

    Anyway, we know Florida is not going to change this requirement for old man's aesthetics concern; just an opinion. . .

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.





    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  18. #368
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Richmond, Virginia
    Posts
    12,063

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Truly fantastic!

    Thank you for sharing your build!

    Now, I hope you share your adventures!

    Cheers,
    Skip

    ---This post is delivered with righteous passion and with a solemn southern directness --
    ...........fighting against the deliberate polarization of politics...

  19. #369
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    345

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by SKIP KILPATRICK View Post
    Truly fantastic!

    Thank you for sharing your build!

    Now, I hope you share your adventures!

    Cheers,

    Hello Skip,

    And thank you for hanging in there
    (or is it came onboard) since the beginning of this cruise! [Post 11 of this thread.]

    Tomorrow, Sunday 27 June, is my last "build update" as today we mounted the last gear on the Night Heron, ready to cruise. . .

    However, the next week (on or about 4 - 5 July) will be the first of a couple of cruising posts reporting on the performance and abilities, or shortcomings, of a flat bottomed river cruiser on an overnighter.

    After that we'll close this thread and when we modify Night Heron in another six months - with an enclosed cockpit [Helm Station] - we'll start a new one.

    Here is an "unpublished" photo of the river we took a few weeks ago. . .

    The Myakka at 4200RPM.jpg

    See ya tomorrow.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.

    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  20. #370
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    345

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Sunday, 27 June 2021
    Last Weekly Build Update

    Hello Everyone,

    Well, it seems like our build updates are at their end. . . so without further ado, here is what occurred this last week as we fought the wet, hot and very muggy weather in an effort to bring Night Heron to safe and comfortable river cruiser status:

    First Tasks
    1 Finishing Tasks.jpg
    1- We cut to size and washed the area rug to serve as the berth panels insulating and slip resisting pad;
    2 - The three berth panels were finished on both sides with 2 coats of topside paint (shown here drying inside the Lanai) to give them a chance at longevity. On previous posts we showed the epoxy and fiberglassing of these panels. As most will recall, the ply we used was scrap from the pattern making thin 1/4 inch (6mm) plywood used;
    3 - The Bimini we ordered came in two weeks ago and this week we dry fitted it. However, we had to make angled pads for the top deck hinges that sit on the caprails so that the main tube structure sits flat, aligns horizontally and is able to swivel on the retaining pin. We made them out of White Oak and will not permanently fix them until we have some experience with "the thing" as the better half coined it. The height of the structure seems too high so we may cut it down about 4 inches (100mm) to suit. Personally, we don't like Biminis, but the Florida Sun is unforgiving so it's either a Bimini or a skin melanoma, and:
    4 - It's hard to believe, but these two pads took all of 6 hours to figure the angle, cut, sand and drill the mounting holes. It was the first time in ages that we took out our undergraduate era Mitutoyo [Yes, we still have it! As well as our Post 1460 Slide Rule.] to measure the part in thousands of an inch! Ahhhh, nostalgia and memories of late night library sessions, cracking books, studying for the finals overtook us.

    Second Tasks
    2 Finishing Tasks.jpg
    1 - We needed two sole grates for the entryway so as to be able to comfortably access the berth and have a way to clean the interior hull underneath with no hassle - so here they are in process;
    2 - Here is the inner grate drying inside the Lanai as rain started to come down right after we finished it;
    3 - The center line grate drying inside the Lanai across from it's companion, and:
    4 - The two sole grates set in the entryway access to the berth. As can be seen - about a 1/4 inch (6mm) trimming of the shorter, two pieces is required so that the two grates line up properly on the bottom and top edges. (To be done this week.)

    The Berth Build
    The Berth Build.jpg
    1 - The three finished panels fitted and ready to be secured to the frames; simple snap fasteners will be used to secure them to the frames to make the panels easy to mount and dismount. The propane stove nest is visible in the lower right hand corner, awaiting the stove to be mounted;
    2 - The area rug cut to fit was placed on top of the panels to serve as a friction pad to prevent mattress "crawl and slip" and provide some cushioning. The propane stove is mounted as seen on the right hand corner of the photo;
    3 - The mattress, with our distinctive anchor design exterior fabric, ready for dressing with sheets, and:
    4 - A photo taken through the top access hatch showing the pillows and sheets that will be used exclusively for the berth. The berth can be used for two persons, feet to bow, or one person in either direction as the size of the berth is "queen size" capable of comfortably accommodating two, tall persons up to 6'-2" (188cm) height.

    Stretching Room
    Stretching Room.jpg

    This ends the weekly build updates as we'll be doing very little to Night Heron in the coming weeks. . . in six months this will change as we contemplate building an enclosed "helm station" that partially covers the cockpit as per our original design, shown on previous posts. We'll start another post when we begin this venture as we feel it may contribute to the knowledge base of this forum and it's membership.

    Next week, our final post, we''ll report on
    the performance of a 40hp boat on the river and the comfort (or lack thereof) of a flat bottomed dory on the hook for a two day overnighter. . .

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  21. #371
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    345

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Sunday, 04 July 2021
    Bimini Installation & Performance Run

    Hello Everyone,

    First - Happy Independence Day to all in the USA and any US Expat offshore. We wish you a safe and joyous holiday.

    Secondly - This is not a "build update" per se as we only have the Bimini installation and an average of the performance runs we ran to report this week.

    This week, by the way, was awful as it rained every day, upsetting our plans for an overnighter; this week we're facing a severe "tropical depression" named Elsa - just like the Great Dane owned by a neighbor down the street. We hope and pray Elsa doesn't leave us as big a dropping as our neighbor's dog.

    Anyhow, here's our weeks results. . .

    The Bimini
    Bimini Comparison.jpg
    We did the Bimini installation on Monday morning, about 2 hours before it began to rain "cats and dogs." On Tuesday, we re-installed the Bimini cut down so as to look a lot better (as if that is even possible) and again - the downpour started almost on cue at 1030 hours.

    Helm View
    Helm View.jpg
    We knew that we had a 3 hour "Wednesday Window" to do a few runs before the downpour began and we jumped on it! The view from the helm with shade and without the Sun beating down on us was excellent - the only advantage we see to a Bimini.

    View Towards the Stern
    View Towards Stern.jpg
    A composite photo of the "Stern View" was good and without the Sun on your back, very enjoyable!

    Performance Runs Average
    Night Heron Performance Runs.jpg
    We did a number of runs with and without the Bimini up and as expected the difference was notable. Night Heron is not a "runabout" as she was designed as a "river and bay cruiser" so speed is not our goal or focus. . . however, it was good to know just in case we need to beat the weather at high speed to a safer location. These are the averages of multiple runs we made for about 2 hours.

    And then the rains came that caught us as we started to align Night Heron to her slipway entrance. . . talk about soggy! So, after we survive our Elsa this week; we'll see about that overnighter we owe the forum.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.



    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  22. #372
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Charleston, SC
    Posts
    300

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Great looking yacht you made there, Capitan! Everything looks shipshape.
    We have found clipping or tying a sheet or towel to an edge/side of the bimini is sometimes nice at anchor when the sun has gone around the edge of the bimini but is still burning. Have fun!
    A good place to post your future trips is in "people and places"

  23. #373
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    345

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by gray duck View Post
    Great looking yacht you made there, Capitan! Everything looks shipshape.
    We have found clipping or tying a sheet or towel to an edge/side of the bimini is sometimes nice at anchor when the sun has gone around the edge of the bimini but is still burning. Have fun!
    A good place to post your future trips is in "people and places"

    Hello gray duck,
    Thank you for the accolades, we appreciate them!

    Your idea of side curtains is an excellent one that we'll pursue; we have extra cloth
    we purchased for the foam pads we never bought for the cockpit seats. It seems we bought a lot of fabric and then changed the seating arrangements! Anyway, it's a very light gray exterior fabric that we'll turn into mountable/removable "Bimini Curtains" we'll store in the cuddy cabin for use as needed. Thanks for the idea!

    The forum's "People and Places" is another good idea that for some unknown reason we never visited. After your post we took a gander thinking we'd spend a few minutes there. . . we closed the site an hour later!
    After we close this thread, we may use this part of the forum to post a few cruises throughout our neighborhood.Thanks again!

    However, we want to close this thread with a "short cruise and overnighter" post- sort of a "closing of the circle." And, that's it.

    Stay safe, stay healthy,

    J.


    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  24. #374
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    345

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Sunday, 11 July 2021
    Final Post


    Hello Everyone,

    This was a helluva week - we got Elsa as a tropical storm on Wednesday and saw her turn into a hurricane just 47 nautical miles due west of us and 10.7 inches (27.2cm) of rain in the process.

    But, we get ahead of ourselves. . . on Monday, we went on a beautiful cruise along the Myakka River's various natural waterways; the weather was perfect as the better half and I slowly made our way to an islet we'd found where a grassy clearing seemed inviting. We thought Elsa would be far enough into the Gulf of Mexico that all we would get from the infamous right top quadrant would be moderate winds and some rains from the spiraling bands. Here is what occurred:

    Monday's Cruise
    Monday Midday.jpg
    1 - The Myakka was smooth and with light winds and the Bimini to shield us from the Sun, a pleasure to cruise;
    2 - View towards the stern as we picked up speed to drop the hook and have "lunch at the islet" - or so we thought;
    3 - After dropping off the better half on one of the islet's clearings, we took the opportunity for taking photos of Night Heron "strutting her stuff." This picture, among many, were taken, and:
    4 - The better half called us on the cell as she walked over to the end of the clearing and said to pull Night Heron to the rock in front of the sign (arrow) as she was coming aboard as soon as the bow touched the soft
    sandy bottom. So much for having lunch on the islet - we ate our sandwiches and drank our soft drinks on board Night Heron, on the hook, in front of the islet.

    Islet Sign & Return
    Islet Sign and Return.jpg
    1 - Here is the photo - enlarged - so that the sign is readable. No, we did not see the resident of the islet but as we were having our humble lunch a weather notice for our area came over the radio that Elsa was veering towards our coast and probably making landfall near St. Petersburg/
    Tampa, only 47 nautical miles (in a straight line) from us! The timeline for landfall was Wednesday/Thursday night, and:
    2 - So much for an overnighter - with only a day and a half to prepare for a tropical storm/hurricane we had no options but to motor back to our home and prepare for the worst.

    A Tropical Storm becomes a Hurricane
    Hurricane Elsa.jpg
    The photo with the text we added is self explanatory. . . the only comment we add is that the winds were, uncannily, light in our particular area running from 20 knots sustained with gusts up to 30 knots. We had no damage in our canal community with surge, flooding or winds.

    The Helm Station
    Future Build.jpg
    The original design for Night Heron shows the Helm Station with the Bimini affixed to the structure as shown on a previously posted composite photo. We hope to do this in about 6 months when the weather is cooler.

    This build tread, however, will be closed in a week. . .

    We want to thank all of you for your comments, suggestions, ideas we've used, ideas we didn't but that gave us alternatives, for having introduced us to beautiful older boats, accolades and most of all - the kindness you've shown us over these months of ups and downs. It has all been a truly excellent experience.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.






    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  25. #375
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    South Patrick Shores, USA
    Posts
    777

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Hey Joe,

    Many thanks for all of the info, observations, procedures and humor you've provided in this thread! And on top of all that, now you have a great cruising vessel! With built-in projects to go with it!

    Well done!

    Eric

    PS Please give our best to the supervisor!
    “Retiring feels like death of self, but I'm looking forward to the rebirth - The opportunity to re-imagine my purpose.”

    Michael Bennett

  26. #376
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    SW Washington/ At Sea
    Posts
    481

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Be sure to post a few pics of your cruises somewhere on the forum. I'm looking forward to seeing the new windshield arrangement.

  27. #377
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    345

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by FishoutaFlorida View Post
    Hey Joe,

    Many thanks for all of the info, observations, procedures and humor you've provided in this thread! And on top of all that, now you have a great cruising vessel! With built-in projects to go with it!

    Well done!

    Eric

    PS Please give our best to the supervisor!
    Hello Eric,

    And thank you for your participation. . .

    With a half garage shop that works well for you we're sure you'll keep at it and splash your boat soon. BTW, we'll be following your build posts so don't slow down - even for plumbing issues.

    We've had a lot of fun doing these build posts and communicating with everyone that responded to them. We'll miss that.

    This one's for you, Eric, the last picture we took of the feathered one - or the "Ham" who loves the camera.

    IMG_20210413_112525719.jpg

    Stay Safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  28. #378
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    345

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by Powerwagon View Post
    Be sure to post a few pics of your cruises somewhere on the forum. I'm looking forward to seeing the new windshield arrangement.
    Hello Powerewagon,

    Yes, we'll be posting on the forum's "People and Places" section when we do that overnighter we plan on doing this summer. As for the "Helm Station" - this will be a new post in about 6 months.

    Hope to see you then.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  29. #379
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    South Patrick Shores, USA
    Posts
    777

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by Kapiteinterzee View Post
    With a half garage shop that works well for you we're sure you'll keep at it and splash your boat soon. BTW, we'll be following your build posts so don't slow down - even for plumbing issues.

    We've had a lot of fun doing these build posts and communicating with everyone that responded to them. We'll miss that.

    This one's for you, Eric, the last picture we took of the feathered one - or the "Ham" who loves the camera.

    IMG_20210413_112525719.jpg

    Stay Safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    Beautiful! and Ham doesn't look too bad either!

    With regard to the Hartley 14, I'm hoping to solve some mast installation issues, finish the rigging and splash this puppy ASAP!

    Enjoy!
    “Retiring feels like death of self, but I'm looking forward to the rebirth - The opportunity to re-imagine my purpose.”

    Michael Bennett

  30. #380
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    345

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Thank you all!
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

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