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Thread: The Birth of the Night Heron

  1. #316
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    332

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by Smilemon View Post
    It's all coming together so well. I just want to point out that you started this thread about 1 year ago (2/27/2020) and it's been an absolute joy to read your progress reports through this pandemic.
    Hello Smilemon,
    Thank you for the reminder and your kind words. . . here are two photos of the journey from then to now "between the trees."

    The Back Story
    Space Between the Trees.jpg
    We had just finished building a pergola and a dock when a neighbor asked what would we do for an "encore." Not thinking about it we responded - "Build a boat!" We quickly realized that we had just made a moral commitment of sorts as word got around the neighborhood that we were going to build a boat. And, as John Wade once said - "The rest is history."

    This Week's Detail
    Bow Chock Embedded in Toerail.jpg
    Twelve months later we are embedding a s/s bow chock into an Ash toerail for "the boat between the trees" as some neighbors have coined the effort.

    Yes, it's been a very good year despite the C-19 pandemic and, in a macabre way, helpful that we had to stay in place to avoid getting sick.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  2. #317
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    332

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Sunday, 7 March 2021
    Weekly Build Update

    Hello Everyone,
    Another good week on the Sun Coast made for a lot of work that appears to be a a mere pittance of results. . . well, we're sure most of you know that feeling that you've "put in all that work and have little to show for it."

    Anyway, here are "our efforts to earn our keep" if you will. . .

    Monday Morning
    Monday Morning.jpg
    1 - As we worked on various build activities we realized that we were using Night Heron but did not meet one of the basic tenets of good seamanship on small boats - we did not have a boat paddle. So, as we were also tired of taping, finishing and removing tape afterwards. . . anyway, we found a cupped piece of fiberglassed wood that was meant for a port door so we jigsaw cut it to shape of a paddle blade;
    2 - We grabbed an old wood curtain rod we'd removed from the house during rehabbing (stored in the tool shed) and shaped a recessed "handle" using our old belt sander;
    3 - The slot was cut into the other end of the wood rod on the table saw to the width of the paddle blade, finished and cleaned up with a Japanese hand saw and shaped on the sander, and:
    4 - The paddle was assembled with thickened epoxy and painted with our "homemade penetrating epoxy." After, it was set to dry until the next day when it was topside paint finished. Two days - two coats of topside paint.

    Monday through Thursday
    Monday to Thursday.jpg
    1 - We worked on the toerails cutting a profile of the cocks on the bow end of the Ash piece with a coping saw. Fitting the chocks were a chore as sanding with a fingernail file stolen from the better half's collection made progress very slow;
    2 - The toerails were dry-fitted to the decks a number of times as the edges of the decks had to be sanded to make a smooth arced edge for the wood to follow;
    3 - It took three days to finish the Ash toerails - our routine was a daily application of finish and storing them in the Lanai in the evening. We repeated this action three times, and:
    4 - It took many hours to mount both toerails onto the decks with 5200 and s/s wood screws. After mounting, we caulked the edge of the deck with gray tinted caulking material to prevent water trapping between the decks and the toerails.

    Friday
    Friday.jpg
    1 - We were able to drill the port side holes for the three larger deadlights; we still have to drill two more smaller holes for the smaller deadlights. This week we plan on drilling all the holes for the Starboard deadlights and installing them to finish the cabin;
    2 - A Port side bow to amidships photo of the installed toerail and the deadlight exterior ring, and:
    3 - The Bruce anchor, anchor holder and hawsepipe dry-fitted on the bow to ascertain fit, size and appropriateness.

    Saturday
    Saturday.jpg
    1 - It rained on Saturday, so as "idle hands are the Devil's workshop" we opted to do some marlinespike work on the boat paddle that was now sufficiently dry to handle;
    2 - We started with dis-assembling an old leather belt no longer in use, and:
    3 - After a three hour water soaking, we wrapped the leather strips around the handle of the shaft of the paddle and left it to dry, out of harm's way next to our home entry table. Once the handle dries we plan on painting a few stripes on the blade of the paddle. BTW, the paddle measures 7 feet (2.1M) and can be used sitting on the bow of the boat for emergency use [outboard goes kaput.]

    That was it. . .

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  3. #318
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    332

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Sunday, 14 March 2021
    Weekly Build Update

    Hello Everyone,
    It was a very good week here starting with Monday morning when we got to work on finishing the boat paddle and not doing anything else for the rest of the day.

    Monday mid-day was our C-19 vaccine session event and after that, with a sore arm, all we got to do for the rest of the day was make a limited action plan for the week with "limited physical resources" as our arm really felt tender. Be that as it may, or as it was, we did do a number of activities that did not follow a daily schedule, but due to their nature, were more activity focused with no definite timeline. Here are the results of those activities. . .

    The Boat Paddle
    1 Monday to Monday Boats Paddle.jpg
    1 - This activity was a Monday to Monday week's worth of work and here are the steps as we reported last week, ending this week - first. the assembly;
    2 - The Paddle was painted and the leather handle wrapping made and affixed - also reported last week;
    3 - The Blade of the Paddle was finished with red and gray topside paint stripes on Monday morning prior to our C-19 vaccine session, and:
    4 - The Paddle on Monday evening outside, drying and finished.

    How to Make a Deadlight
    2 How To Make A Deadlight.jpg
    1 - Start with an LED flush ceiling lamp the size you need - and disassemble it. We used a 5 3/4" (147mm) OD, with a 4" (100mm) diameter light as this fit our requirements;
    2 - Set the LED strip and transformer aside for other uses (we plan on making a custom lamp) and save the bezel and frosty plastic lens. The lamp comes with 3 inserts: one transparent frosty, one translucent and one opaque. We chose the frosty translucent as it provides better light transmission into the cabin;
    3 - Using a metal blade saw, carefully cut off the two tabs on the aluminum bezel (do this outside or your better half will castigate you in some serious way) to make the interior mounting rim flush;
    4 - Carefully run a thin bead of 5200 on the inside rim of the bezel and with delicate very clean fingers place the lens you want inside the rim insuring that 5200 is sticking along the periphery of the lens. Place the assembled bezel/lens "face down" in a location where it cannot be disturbed for 24 hours [5200 needs 24 hours];
    5 - Insure you have the correct location indexed and plainly identified on the cabin side as you only have one shot at getting your deadlight in the correct location - we pre-drilled a small diameter hole prior to using our correctly sized hole cutter to cut into the cabin side. The cutter is sized to the interior diameter of the bezel that holds the lens;
    6 - The Starboard side holes drilled for mounting the four deadlights, and;
    7 - The Port side deadlights mounted with the translucent frosty lens using 5200 as the adhesive - we used 5200 as it can be wiped off after "fileting" (or smearing the lens) and not leaving a mess if it's done within a few minutes before surface skinning takes place. [Why build your own? Do a web search for the answer; hint - cost!]

    The Ash Cabin Side Trim
    3 Cabin Trim.jpg
    1 - We ripped two 1 1/4" (32mm) high by 1/4" (6mm) thick strips from the Ash plank left over from the Toerails cut - the lengths of the cuts are equal but the trim pieces will not be as the cabin sides are not identical in length. As you'll note - the starboard cabin side has the helm pocket cut into it. We made the forward end of the trim pieces "pointy" to give it a "semblance" of design;
    2 - The trim pieces were first coat finished and will be mounted when the third coat is hard - usually within four days if we get low humidity, and:
    3 - The Port side trim piece dryfitted to ascertain location height.

    The Hull
    Hull Finishing.jpg
    1 - As we mentioned in last weeks post - we scraped the entire hull of Night Heron because we were not happy with some areas that did not adhere properly and the fact that topside finishing repairs would not "blend in" properly leaving "splotches" as our test revealed. Additionally, our fascination with the new topside system would not have looked seamless with the previous hull finish;
    2 - The hull was scraped, TSP washed and 180 grit longboard sanded with repairs effected on a few deep scratches and "pits." After that sanding it was cleaned with a solvent wash/de-waxer to remove any contaminants left behind to insure a good clean surface in preparation for the primer;
    3 - The primer was carefully applied on a mid-day (Thursday) when low humidity was forecasted - a key element that we also measured with our RH meter, and:
    4 - On Saturday we finally fixed in place the bow cleats, hawsepipe and anchor roller assembly with 5200 and it's appropriate bolts and backplates. We consider the bow finished and ready for ground tackle.

    All in all it was a pretty good week - even with a sore arm that lasted a full three days.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  4. #319
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Toodyay, Western Australia
    Posts
    1,226

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Those deadlights are pure genius! Very impressed.

  5. #320
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    332

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by Small boats rock View Post
    Those deadlights are pure genius! Very impressed.

    Hello Small boats rock,
    Good to hear from you and thanks for the accolade - do appreciate it!

    On Friday night we toyed with different design ideas to make the bezel look more "nautical."

    We thought about adding different features such as rivets and screws with round heads and through bolting the bezel with a bolt pattern of those deadlights you find on the internet. We used a bag of buttons, borrowed from the better half, to size head sizes and "degrees spread" from 60°, 72°, 90° and 120°. It was one of those fun things that made for an evening of discussion with the better half and a few neighbors. But, in keeping with our KIS practice we left it as it was.

    We've attached the composite photo that shows design ideas we toyed with (the photo did not make it into Sunday's Build Post) for anyone who would like to use these suggestions.

    Stay in touch. . . we appreciate your comments.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.

    Deadlight Design Ideas.jpg
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  6. #321
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    332

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Sunday, 21 March 2021
    Weekly Build Update

    Hello Everyone,
    We had a wonderful week on the Sun Coast as the days were sunny and coupled with low humidity, made for a "finishers heaven."

    On Monday we had a scheduled blood taking session with a phlebotomist that the doctor ordered for my annual physical so we did not take advantage of the excellent finishing environment in the yard. However, we did entertain ourselves practicing marlinespike since the appointment was for mid-day and "fasting" a requirement. The beauty of marlinespike is that little energy is expended and the brain is relaxed - even when you have to disassemble a tough knit.

    So, here is the week in photos. . .

    Marlinespike Monday
    Marlinspike Monday.jpg
    1 - My Dad gifted us this book when we purchased our first sailboat, Nepenthe, back in 1969, that we used as a "rehabilitation platform" of sorts after our honorable discharge from our service with MACV/SOG in Southeast Asia. We've read and used many of the knots, decorative and practical line solutions not only on boating related needs, but around the house to make "do-dads" and a few gifts such as the "monkey first" key-chain;
    2 - In our morning sweatpants, after breakfast, we started to make the rode to chain splice that is usually reserved for making the line and chain easy to pass through the gypsy of the windlass - a condition that we don't have on Night Heron as we don't have, or plan, on installing a windlass. However, we like the easy less binding retrieval of the line and chain as it passes the anchor roller on it's way to the hawsepipe;
    3 - Most rode to chain splices are not “dressed” but we felt it would look better with the whipping, and as we had nothing better to do after our Dracula event; we did the “Riggers Whipping” as shown in The Ashley Book of Knots, and:
    4 - The dressed rode to chain splice ready to be sent below to rest inside the chain locker
    , never it be seen again until we anchor in the near future. . . our neighbor Stan did get a chance to see it as we were photographing the bow. All he said was that it was "pretty and a work of art". . . oh well.

    Testing Tuesday
    Tuesday.jpg
    1 - It was five days since we mounted, and embedded in 5200, the cleats, chocks and anchor roller on the bow. . . so we wanted to test the holding ability of the cleats and chocks to hold the boat. We figure that if something fails - it's better if it does on the slipway than on the hook;
    2 - The starboard side cleat and chock held 405 pounds (184kgs) with no issue. . . how we did it was to lower Night Heron down the slipway with the dock line tied to the winch hook and pulling her back up;
    3 - The port side cleat and chock also held up to the pull test too with no issues whatsoever - although our pull weigh was down to 390 pounds (177kgs) - a pull loss we attribute to the slipway's wheel's bearings becoming more agile as we tested both sides a number of times, and:
    4 - Here is our resident Great Egret, "Warrior" [he fights with all the other Egrets but respects our cherished Herons] checking out the white finish as we play with the anchor rode splice to chain holding test.

    Digging Wednesday (and Finishing Friday)
    Wednesday and Friday.jpg
    1 - We had to widen the starboard side "trench" to comfortably work on that side of the Night Heron; an activity we did not plan on doing until we tried to sand the hull and found the task, well, taxing;
    2 - Two hours later the width of the trench was wide enough to allow us to sit and sand, clean and finish the starboard side hull with some comfort;
    3 - The entire hull of the Night Heron was 220 grit longboarded, dusted and cleaned with a solvent cleaner/dewaxer and left for further work on Wednesday afternoon, and:
    4 - On Friday we finally got one coat on the entire hull of the white topside paint we used for the cuddy cabin. . . what happened to Thursday(?) - read on.

    Trimming Thursday and Finishing Saturday
    Thursday and Saturday.jpg
    1 - Thursday was a very humid, cool day with a rain menace according to the meteorologists. . . so we worked on the trim for the cuddy cabin sides as continued finishing was not a good idea. Here is the trim mounted on the starboard side that morning;
    2 - The port side was mounted that Thursday afternoon - BTW, the mounting was simple using a silicone bronze nail, cut to 1/2" length (12mm) driven into an undersized hole to permit the nail from penetrating the wall but holding the trim in place as the 5200 set. The 5200 provides adhesion and waterproofing;
    3 - This photo shows the detail of the forward end of the trim that was originally "pointy" but in keeping with our desire to round everything as much as possible - we rounded the trim's tip. In the photo you can also see the silicone bronze nail's heads that gives the trim a slight design detail, and:
    4 - The hull of Night Heron as it appears today, Sunday, 21 March, with the third coat of the topside paint finished on Saturday, midday. Monday, 22 March, the hull will get it's fourth and final coat.

    We hope to have another good weather week so that our cuddy cabin and hull will be finished this coming week and we can get inside the cabin to finish it too. That was our week - hope yours was as productive as well.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  7. #322
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    332

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Sunday, 28 March 2021
    Weekly Build Update

    Hello Everyone,
    Excellent, hot weather made for a few shortened days but all in all we enjoyed doing joinery once again as the cabin/cockpit began to look "finished."

    Here is the weekly build update photos that was heavy into moldings but light on everything else. . .

    Monday - 4th Coat Day
    Monday.jpg
    1 - Night Heron as she appeared on Monday morning before we began our final finishing effort;
    2 - A half bucket of RO water from our drinking tap was used as the wet 400 grit sanding water medium;
    3 - Our regular sanding pad was used as we were only "lightly wet sanding" the surface to "scuff" the shiny surface of the polyurethane topside paint, and:
    4 - After our routine of wet sanding, RO washing, drying, solvent cleaner/dewaxing and, finally, 4th coating. . . the Night Heron's hull was finished!

    Tuesday - Hatch Mounting Day
    Tuesday Hatch Mounting Day.jpg
    We've followed other threads on this forum and it seems everyone has different methods and favorite products to mount hatches and portholes. . . here is our method.
    1 - Thoroughly clean the surfaces where your hatch will be permanently mounted with a sponge lightly loaded with soap and water; rinse and dry with a terry cloth rag and finally, follow up with a solvent/dewaxer rag rubdown. [BTW, our Heron had dirty muddy feet - no poop!]
    2 - We placed the hatch in place and traced the periphery with a soft pencil so as not to mark the white finish. Then we removed it and using painters tape, masked the traced line. After masking we smeared 5200 along the edge of the tape to the inside edge (inside the cabin) of the aperture. The surface looked like it had been smeared with white creamy cheese, about 1/4 inch (6mm) thick;
    3 - The hatch is carefully placed into the aperture - the fit should be "snug" but not an interference fit. . . the 5200 should ooze out onto the tape mask as you position it into place. There should not be any wiggle or see-sawing of the hatch frame on either axis [this issue should have been resolved prior to the final fitting]. With a cotton swab (known as "Q-Tips") remove the 5200 from the screw holes and carefully center your drill bit (the drill bit must be the root diameter of the screw you use for securing the hatch) and drill to the proper depth of the screw. Remove the shavings from the screw hole with the cotton swab. We use a clockwise drill and screw insertion pattern starting at the port hinge. We do not tighten the screws completely down until all the screws are in place. Once all the screws are in their holes we tighten down to a 25 ft/lbs (34Nm) in three increments around the clock to insure that the hatch's thin aluminum frame sits "stress-less" along it's periphery, and:
    4- Using our latex gloved index finger we fillet the 5200 along the periphery of the hatch to give it a smooth finish and clean off the 5200 that smeared the frame. Once the 5200 develops a surface skin, usually within 3 hours, we remove the mask.

    Wednesday - Molding Measurement & Cutting Day
    Wednesday Molding Measurement and Cutting.jpg
    1 - First thing Wednesday morning we checked the "finished product" and found the 5200 fillet had set well all around - the few smears on the frame and inside the cabin we missed the day before were cleaned up;
    2 - A final photo of the complete hatch, closed, looking like it was molded in place;
    3 - The rest of the morning was spent taking measurements and making sketches to make "L" shaped moldings as the day moved forward, and:
    4 - A cabin top molding dry fitted that afternoon awaiting mounting.

    Thursday and Friday - Molding Mounting Days
    Thursday and Friday Molding Mounting Day.jpg
    1 - The cabin top molding was dry fitted on the roof and with a soft pencil the outline traced and taped. The area of vertical and horizontal contact of the molding to the cabin top roof was smeared with 5200 and the molding clamped in place. A mounting hole was drilled with a bit sized to the root diameter of the silicone bronze nail's rings to the depth of the nail's length (3/4 inch - 19mm). . . the nail was carefully tapped into place;
    2 - After all the holes and nails were done - securing both moldings to the cabin top - we used a latex gloved index finger to fillet the 5200 along the top to "finish" it;
    3 - A photo of the helm notch molding before the masking tape was removed, and:
    4 - The finished molding after the 5200 had "skinned" - finishing will start on Monday, 29 March with the same product as used on the trim, toerails and rubrails to maintain continuity.

    Saturday - Access Door Hinge Jambs Day
    Saturday Door Frame Hinge Jambs.jpg
    1 - We measured, ripped a channel and shaped the 8 foot (4.3m) long SYP lumber piece into two hinge jambs to make the framework for our soon to be made cuddy cabin access doors;
    2 - This is the profile of the pieces showing how they will fit into the plywood wall and provide a jamb for the doors;
    3 - Carving out the notch for the fit to the bottom cross frame by hand;
    4 - Cutting out the notch for the top cross frame with our Japanese hand saw, and:
    5 - Both hinge jambs dry fitted into the frames/plywood walls awaiting fixing with 5200 and our silicone bronze nails scheduled for Monday, 29 March weather permitting.

    That was our work week. . . we did not do the red stripe for the hull since we want the paint to be very hard before placing tape on it to outline the stripe. . . may be this coming week(?)

    Hope you week was as productive as well.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  8. #323
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    South Patrick Shores, USA
    Posts
    762

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Greetings Joe,

    Looks like that last 10% is zipping right along! Motivations I'm getting from your last couple of weeks are knots, joinery and moldings. Maybe knots first.

    Thanks!

    Eric
    “Retiring feels like death of self, but I'm looking forward to the rebirth - The opportunity to re-imagine my purpose.”

    Michael Bennett

  9. #324
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    332

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by FishoutaFlorida View Post
    Greetings Joe,

    Looks like that last 10% is zipping right along! Motivations I'm getting from your last couple of weeks are knots, joinery and moldings. Maybe knots first.

    Thanks!

    Eric
    Hello Eric,
    Thank you for your kind comments, do appreciate it - we started this thread with the idea of being a 76 year old "Motivational Doer." [LOL]

    We're happy you're back on track with your build and yes, marlinespike is a great way to relax instead of watching the evening TV broadcasts with all that advertisement selling "negative news" they fill the airwaves with every night. BTW, we do our marlinespike activity listening to smooth jazz or classical music as a soothing background accompaniment.

    Now, about that 10%. . . and our penchant for real news, good or bad. . .

    My Dad used the expression "snafu" a lot, an adjective he picked up during his tour with Uncle Sam in WW2 as an Army Light Infantry Officer. We too have just had a snafu moment making that 10%, maybe, a setback to 12%(?)

    The red line that wasn't. . .
    The Red Line That Wasn't.jpg

    In an effort to wind up the build's exterior finish- we used a can of red topside paint that was sitting on our paint shelf from 2020. Unfortunately, the new 2021 can we opened to do the starboard side was not the same hue. Same brand, same color designation, but not the same batch.

    Had to sand and solvent wash the red stripe off the port side! The white topside paint suffered a bit and had to be repainted from the edge of the removed red stripe to the bottom paint edge. That was a very unpleasant and tiring experience.

    Hopefully, our week will be a bit better as we repaint that white until the reddish tinge is no longer visible on the white beneath the old red stripe. Could be a 3 coat job.

    Well, that's it for today, Eric.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  10. #325
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    332

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Sunday, 4 April 2021
    Weekly Build Update

    It was a crazy week weather-wise on the Sun Coast as it began as warm, low humidity days, turned to warm, very muggy mid-week and finally to very cold, low humidity at the end.

    The amount of work we put in was not very evident as masking, fine sanding (300 grit), staining, painting, stripping, solvent washing and finishing took a lot of effort in-between that crazy weather pattern.

    Here are the few photos related to this effort. . .

    Monday through Saturday
    Monday to Saturday Mid Day.jpg
    1 - On Monday, 29 March, we masked almost everything "finishable" [is that a word?] on Night Heron, so much so, that the better half commented that the boat was ready for the C-19 vaccine so it could go out in public! Anyway, the cockpit, was masked for white paint (top of the cabin) and wood staining (moldings). The photo shows the cabin top masked and 3 coat white paint finished;
    2 - Closeup of the finished cabin top, without the masking tape, with the molding awaiting staining. The white paint needs 4 to 5 days to harden enough for masking so the molding can be stained without affecting the finish;
    3 - The wood molding stained near the end of the week - the photo shows the stained molding after the masking was removed, and:
    4 - Saturday afternoon showing the hing jambs, moldings and not seen (inside the cabin) the stained hinge jambs and painted walls.

    Port Side Hull Finishing & Repainting
    Port Side Hull Work.jpg
    1 - We had to repaint, with white topside paint, the lower 3 inches (75mm) between the red stripe top and the bottom paint edge, as we posted on Wednesday, because the color of the red stripe did not match the red color of the starboard side stripe. In the popular "Forest Gump" movie, Forrest says - "Stupid is as stupid does." That's how we felt after this "snafu" that we could have avoided by comparing both red paint pint (478ml) cans prior to masking and painting the stripe. A word to the wise - before doing any finishing check that you have paint from the same batch! Anyway, it took an entire day of solvent cleaning and waiting for the next day to sand and wash the red off the white pain. Repainting took almost 4 days because - as everyone knows - topside paint needs 24 hours to be re-coated, and:
    2 - On Saturday morning we removed the masking tape after the red tinge was no longer evident. The almost imperceptible ridge between both white paints will be "lost" when we mask the hull for striping - with the right red paint in another 5 days. . .

    Starboard Side Hull Stripe
    Starboard Side Hull Work.jpg
    1 - The starboard side of the hull with the masking tape and two coats of red paint applied. This task only took three days. . . This is how the port side should have looked, and:
    2 - Saturday mid-day after the masking tape of the red stripe was carefully removed. . . very carefully removed!

    That was our crazy week; full of details and errors we hope to correct this coming week, again, weather permitting and using common sense!

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    Last edited by Kapiteinterzee; 04-04-2021 at 08:21 AM.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  11. #326
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    332

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Sunday, 11 April 2021
    Weekly Build Update

    Hello Everyone,
    The week was, as Mom used to say on occasion - "Es ist volkommen egal, wie langsam du voran kommst; du uberholst immer noch jeden, de gar nichts tut." Or, in English - "It doesn't matter how slow you go; you're still lapping the people doing nothing."

    Well, that was our week - moving slowly as we lost half of Monday and Tuesday entirely due to the reaction we had to the second dose of Moderna C-19 vaccine on Monday mid-day. Here is how the week went using our photo timeline. . .

    Monday (Half Day) & Thursday
    Monday & Thursday.jpg
    1 - We started Monday morning making a SYP cosmetic piece with an angled base to "finish" the deck plate and provide some protection to the engine control module. The angle was not just a straight 22° as the slope was on two planes. This required constant adjustments (and trips to the bench sander) to get the piece to "sit right" and provide a stable footprint for the thickened epoxy to properly set it in place;
    2 - On Thursday mid-morning, we finished sanding and painted the piece, the masked area of the deck and the cap rail with gray paint;
    3 - Thursday afternoon was dedicated to carefully mounting the Night Heron graphics. Our "graphics guy" had the artwork so we had no issue replacing them [remember that we had to scrape the entire hull and refinish it with new topside paint] and after an hour of measuring and finagling, the job on the starboard side was done, and:
    4 - Ditto for the port side that made for about two hours of sitting on the ground, "Indian style" getting leg cramps and very dusty.

    Tuesday
    Tuesday C-19 Vax Card.jpg
    We post this only because we had no picture of us moping about the house, half spent, mostly listless and falling asleep everywhere. Was it worth it? You bet it was!

    Monday to Thursday
    Monday to Thursday.jpg
    1 - Monday morning, after the cosmetic piece was set in epoxy, and two hours to our C-19 appointment, we were able to mask the port side hull for painting the red stripe we had so many issues with. We only got to "rough up" the paint between the tape and wash it with the cleaner/dewaxer solvent. The actual first coat did not happen until Wednesday mid-day when we could move about with some sense of balance and purpose, and:
    2 - Thursday morning we carefully removed the masking tape and declared the red striping tasks done!

    Wednesday & Saturday
    Wednesday & Saturday.jpg
    1 - Before painting the first coat of the red stripe on the port side of the hull we went "ahead dead slow" to test ourselves. Getting over the gunwales was a chore [expletives omitted] getting our legs over the side. Once inside the cuddy cabin, we found that we had forgotten the drill extension cord and had to go back over the gunwales [more expletives omitted] to get it. After much ado. . . we mounted the boats oar on the overhead frame inside the cuddy cabin where we found it fit;
    2 - Next on our "mounting binge" was the fire extinguisher - once mounted we felt that we were finally "smooth sailing" as it were;
    3 - The boat hook was the last item to mount, and:
    4 - On Saturday morning we sanded the bow stem to get it ready for finishing, possibly on Monday or Tuesday this coming week - weather permitting.

    Friday
    Friday.jpg
    1 - Friday was "splash day" for "sea trails" to test the handling of Night Heron on the water. Her additional "cuddy cabin weight" was calculated to bring her up to, approximately, 1100 pounds (about 500kgs) wet. Testing her handling and planning abilities were our goals, although we admit - we missed not having her on the water for over a month and a half for purely egotistical reasons. [For the record - we don't have an egotistical personalty as defined by the medical community.] When the tide rose to our minimum launch window - we splashed her! Wow! What a feeling as she got on plane at 3200RPM and breezed along at 5200RPM - her additional weigh making for a more "solid ride." Full circle power rings showed her to be more steady as her hard chines dug into the water more so than at her previous weight. The wind had little to no effect on handling with the hatch slightly cracked. The only detriment (that we expected) was her gas consumption - it went up slightly. This photo, taken back at her nest, shows a slight list to starboard at the quarter. . . however;
    2 - Prior to launch, we had filled three 6 gallon (23 liters) plastic pails with water for a total of 18 gallons (68 liters) and a weight of 126 pounds (57kgs) to serve as a makeshift water tank size indicator. We weighed each pail on our bathroom scale to precisely have a "full tank weight." The intent here is to properly size and install a potable water tank for dish washing and showering off salt water without inducing leaning, list and heel on the hull at rest;
    3 - We placed two pails inside the cuddy cabin where we wanted to install a permanent water tank. Incredibly - the list was almost corrected. Placing three full pails over-corrected so we discharged a third of the water from one pail and the listing was eliminated. Now we know that our fresh water tank is going to be about 15 gallons (57 liters) and:
    4 - A final photo of the Night Heron showing off her stern with no discernible list.

    That was our "truncated week" where we really didn't do that much. . . or as much as we had planned. . . however, this week looks very promising as we get to do more cockpit/cuddy cabin finishing prior to requesting our boat inspection and subsequent registration. We hope you had a better one!

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  12. #327
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Between Bourgeoisie and Proletariat - Australia
    Posts
    5,901

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Would you go 80litres considering they won't always be full?

    congratulations on the sea trials. A very methodical approach.
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  13. #328
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    332

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by gypsie View Post
    Would you go 80litres considering they won't always be full?

    congratulations on the sea trials. A very methodical approach.
    Hello gypsie,
    Good to hear from you. . . thanks for your note - do appreciate it.

    Here is a sketch we prepared for our "Spec Book" [a document we'll be submitting with the Vessel Inspection Request Form] showing the size, location and anchoring of the water tank we plan on installing.

    Water Tank Size & Location.jpg

    Your idea of installing a larger tank would over-correct the list as the water, plastic tank and small pump weight would be about 90 kilos. The additional weight is about 25 kilos over our max goal of 65 kilos. Our real fill to water volume is 55 liters, or 55 kilos, to correct our current list. The additional 10 liters of our chosen tank is for future loading corrections.

    And that's it for now, except. . .

    A brief, final comment - we're working on a "Speed to RPM and Performance Log" for the Spec Book; hope to post it in another week or two.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  14. #329
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    332

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Sunday, 18 April 2021
    Weekly Build Update

    Hello Everyone,
    This was a perfect week on the Sun Coast with beautiful weather. . . but for us, it was a slow tedious week where, again, a lot of effort for which we have little to show. Here is our week's timeline:

    Monday & Tuesday
    Monday & Tuesday.jpg
    1 - The stem of Night Heron was not properly sealed when we finished it the first time. So, after going through the trauma of refinishing the entire hull - we took it slow and did our best to do it right this time around. Here is the stem on Monday morning after the thickened epoxy was rock hard, ready to sand;
    2 - The stem, finished and with two coats of paint on Tuesday afternoon after the masking tape came off;
    3 - We forgot that a power boat with a Bruce anchor on the bow roller could make for some nasty, unexpected stops if Bruce takes a dip at 20 knots! We ordered a chain tensioner a week ago and on Tuesday morning as the stem topside paint was drying - we mounted it with 5200 and stainless steel #8 screws, and:
    4 - The tensioner on duty holding Bruce back from surprising us!

    Wednesday
    Wednesday.jpg
    1 - The fuel tanks/seats were never fully finished as the layout was for the most part, "temporary." We all know that some temporary fixes have a tendency to become permanent; these became just that;
    2 - We made corner moldings and mounted them with adhesive and stainless steel brads. We plan on finishing them this coming week as we continue to make cosmetic fixes in the cockpit;
    3 - We spent a considerable amount of time inside the cuddy cabin doing filleting and contemplating the finished interior - we took a few photos to colorized them to see what a tasteful color scheme or lack of color in some cases would be more fitting for the inside of the cabin, and:
    4 - We are also changing the interior of the cuddy cabin as the water tank we plan on installing dictates reorganizing it. Our old sketch will be changed to suit as it's an integral part of our "Specifications" - a document that is a part of our Vessel Inspection Request Form we plan on submitting in a few weeks.

    Thursday to Saturday
    Thursday to Saturday.jpg
    1 - We scored a Plexiglas windshield on a local sales site at a fraction of the cost for a new one. . . however, a frame for it, consistent with our hull/cuddy cabin's design, has not been an easy grind;
    2 - The first layout as seen on 1, above, and on this photo, is not what we ended up with as of Saturday;
    3 - This was the second try at a pleasing base for the windshield and after a number of "dry fittings" and rejecting this one too, and:
    4 - "Take Three" of the windshield base as of Saturday afternoon, awaiting sanding. BTW, the base is indicated by the arrow - that flying ham on top of it just got in the way! The windshield mount has become the "elephant in the room" and hopefully will be history this coming week. This is a design and taste issue!

    We also hope to finalize a number of loose ends within the next two weeks before submitting our Vessel Inspection Request Form, get our Registration Numbers and become legal on the water.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  15. #330
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Zbigit
    Posts
    2,254

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    I haven't checked in here, for a while. The cabin looks great!

  16. #331
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    332

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan H View Post
    I haven't checked in here, for a while. The cabin looks great!
    Hello Alan,
    Good to hear from you. . . thanks for the accolade, it's appreciated.

    Yeah, the cuddy is finished outside but undergoing a number of changes inside as to colors, layout and such.

    Hope to bring the build to a conclusion in the next few weeks as we work on the cockpit, cuddy doors, installing a fresh water tank/pump and the berths.

    Methinks we'll conclude the build and sign off with the first "overnighter" and breakfast on board at a beautiful Myakka River location.
    Looking_toward_the_Myakka_river.jpg

    Stay tuned!

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  17. #332
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    332

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Sunday, 25 April 2021
    Weekly Build Update

    Hello Everyone,
    Well, the weather was horrible for Monday and Tuesday as rain prevented us from opening our "Outdoors No Shop" for 2 full days! So much for our so called Sun Coast!

    However, bad weather gave us time for "doodling" and making a "punch list" [Oh no. . . the ghost of a past career emerges!] so all in all, being shut in wasn't too bad for the soul, although a setback to the build. Here we go. . .

    Monday and Tuesday
    Rainy Days.jpg
    Rainy Days. . . no outside activity.

    Wednesday & Thursday AM
    Wednesday .jpg
    1 - Using repurposed white oak flooring slats and left over "pattern making 1/4 inch (6mm) plywood" we made the two cuddy cabin doors. We cut to size the frames, grooved them to take the ply insert and sanded, sanded and sanded the eight pieces on our ancient sander;
    2 - That afternoon we had one door glued together ready for further sanding or was it re-sanding, re-sanding, re-sanding;
    3 - On Thursday morning, we rounded the door's corners and dry fitted them to insure fit, and:
    4 - Before we set up our day, Saturday, we gave the doors the first coat of finish and set them to dry inside the lanai where bugs and dust couldn't get at them.

    Thursday PM & Friday
    Thursday PM & Friday.jpg
    1 - Last week we worked on making a mounting for the Plexiglas windshield and we failed. The doodling on Monday produced this standoff sketch for the windshield after our 3 false starts. We tried to make the standoff easy to make but as it turned out - it wasn't. Oh, how we miss that milling machine we had in our factory shop when our career was blooming! And so, onto our Outdoors No Shop to work on a thick 1 1/2 inch (32mm) dowel;
    2 - We made the first 2 wood standoffs that we had to scrap. . . then, with a bit of re-cutting and a lot of luck, the first two standoffs were fitted - and we regained our confidence in getting back to the right track;
    3 - Here is standoff number three with the angled cut that took about an hour of measuring to attain the proper height.The issue we had to solve was how to keep the windshield level across the sloping cabin top at an angle. This required that the standoffs be from a maximum of 2 inches (50mm) at the starboard bottom edge of the windshield to "0" height at the cabin top center, and:
    4 - All the standoffs dry fitted to the windshield and the cabin top. After this photo, we took the standoffs to a local machine shop to have them duplicated in metal but the cost was prohibitive - and the cost did not include the material! So, this week we plan on dipping the standoffs in penetrating epoxy, filling any defects in the cuts with thickened epoxy and finishing them with topside paint. More on this this week.

    Saturday
    Saturday.jpg
    1 - Fuel starvation was causing our Mercury outboard to sputter on occasion and sometimes requiring that the fuel bulb be pumped to refill the fuel line. The solution was a small fuel pump to keep the line full. Here is where the fuel pump is located - on the outside of the port seat/fuel box after the 3 way valve;
    2 - The fuel pump installed. Notice that we made a mess of the finish of the box's exterior with spilling gasoline - luckily we had planned on re-finishing the 2 seat/fuel boxes, and:
    3 - We couldn't hold back temptation any more. . . so we took a trip along the Myakka River to savor the day if only for a few hours. This is why we build cruising boats isn't it(?)

    And that was the results of our three day week; hope your week was productive too!

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  18. #333
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    332

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Sunday, 2 May 2021
    Weekly Build Update

    Hello Everyone,
    The Sun Coast lived up to it's name this week with sunny, low humidity, and bearable temperature days that made for a truly productive week. We were able to complete a number of projects, you know - those we often classified as - "We'll get to that one tomorrow." [And we never did!]

    Here is our effort in photos for the week but not on a timeline as finishing and waiting for epoxy to set made time for other activities; or, as the better half coined this week - "The concurrent activities week."

    Cuddy Cabin Hinges & Doors
    1 Hinges and Doors.jpg
    1 - We went to mount the doors but were unable to find suitably sized s/s hinges. Necessity being the Mom of Invention - we cut four existing hinges to size in a makeshift jig we made to insure "square." We sanded the cut edges that were like razor blades with 1200 grit and polished the cut with rubbing compound;
    2 - Here is a shot of the hinge mounted to the frame and door;
    3 - The two doors mounted and ready for the astragal to be affixed to the port side door. We also made a white oak arced head jamb to insure a flush fit of the doors to the frame top, and:
    4 - How many clamps do you need on a build? Quick answer - "A bunch!" To clamp the astragal required 7 clamps and the head jamb 4. Luckily, we had another 8 on standby.

    Cuddy Cabin Doors Finished
    2 Finished Doors, Astragal and Head Jamb.jpg
    1 - The doors prior to final finishing - the astragal (lower arrow) and head jamb (top arrow) affixed, sanded and the entire assembly cleaned with the degreaser/dewaxer solvent, and:
    2 - The finished product.

    Standoffs and Windshield
    3 Standoffs and Windshield.jpg
    1 - The wood standoffs were soaked in penetrating epoxy and hung to dry in front of the lanai picture windows;
    2 - All the standoffs were finished with 2 coats of white topside paint prior to mounting them in 5200 and mechanically affixing them to the cabin top with s/s screws;
    3 - A view from the helm of the mounted windshield, and:
    4 - The view from the bow of the windshield.

    Rub Rails
    4 Rub Rails Mounted on Taffrails.jpg
    1 - This was one of those "we'll get that later" jobs. The Port taffrail, sans it's rub rail;
    2 - The Starboard taffrail - ditto;
    3 - Finished white oak rub rails drying inside the lanai awaiting further processing for mounting on taffrails, and:
    4 - With the “Fate motif” of Beethoven's 5 symphony in the background we present - The Rub Rails! [OK. . . so it took 8 months. . . what do you expect from a 76 year old?]

    That was our week - this week we'll continue to finish those odds and ends that'll make Night Heron a proper "River Cruiser" with suitable overnight accommodations.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  19. #334
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Salt Spring Island, BC
    Posts
    7,986

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    I'm pleased to see you having so much fun. Thank you for sharing it.

  20. #335
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    Mosier Oregon
    Posts
    48

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Breakfast aboard will be rewarding!

    Sweet windshield.

    Great work.

    -Derek

  21. #336
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    332

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by Gib Etheridge View Post
    I'm pleased to see you having so much fun. Thank you for sharing it.
    Hello Gib,
    And thank you for your comments. . . It's hard not to have fun doing something that fulfills you as much as building a boat! Especially after we screwed up, failed and finally got it right.

    Here is a shot of the Night Heron being retrieved after a short cruise a few days ago; to maintain our sanity and enthusiasm, we're taken her out ever since her hull was water ready. How can you not have fun?

    Stay in touch and keep posting, we avidly follow your posts.

    Retrieving Night Heron.jpg

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  22. #337
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    332

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by Liberty53 View Post
    Breakfast aboard will be rewarding!

    Sweet windshield.

    Great work.

    -Derek
    Hello Derek,
    Thank you for your note. . . appreciate it!

    BTW, here is a shot of the stove we'll be cooking that breakfast on; we just got the thing last night. It's a full size 2 burner gas unit.

    Stove Storage Wall.jpg

    We'll be storing it in a "nest" on the wall of the cuddy cabin starboard side entryway so that it's out of the way when not needed. The cooking area will be on a "swing up table" on the starboard side between the seat/fuel box and the stern seat. Yeah, we haven't made those puppies yet - now we have 2 more projects to do!

    Oh, one last thing - that pillow is not for snoozing - it's for saving our knees when we work inside the cuddy cabin.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  23. #338
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    332

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Sunday, 9 May 2021
    Weekly Build Update

    Hello Everyone,
    There was more Sun than Coast on the "Sun Coast" this last week as well as generous amounts of humidity to boot! This week can be called the precursor to what's coming this summer as brutal heat and humidity made for very short days outside the house.

    Well, weather made us invested many afternoons inside the house doodling and web searching for that queen size foam mattress we need for the cuddy cabin. Here are the projects we were able to see through this hot, nasty week. . .

    Weather.jpg
    1 - We were told by the weatherman that the week would get hot with some humidity, and:
    2 - We got really hot and humid days that made for 3 hour workdays until Friday and Saturday when it became a bit bearable.

    Water Tank Nest & Mounting
    Water Tank Nest.jpg
    Water Tank Mounting.jpg
    1 - Our practice is not to have anything touching the hull ply bottom or sides inside the boat - we prefer to mount everything onto the frames - so, we made a nest for our 16 gallon (60 Lts) water tank to locate it between frames 5 and 6. The nest was made from a stack of SYP scrap strips we had in the wood pile that we laminated at the beginning of the week. This was our latest effort to use what was in the wood heap in lieu of running to the box store to buy more wood;
    2 - The nest after dry fitting in-between frames 5 and 6 and adjusted to size epoxied and mechanically fixed;
    3 - The nest painted prior to mounting;
    4 - The nest fixed in place with epoxy and s/s screws;
    5 - Hold-down straps being readied for mounting using the s/s ends we cut from the cuddy cabin door hinges [shown last week] to serve as "washers";
    6 - The stainless steel screw through the strap's loop prior to mounting on the frame;
    7 - Both straps mounted on the frame, and:
    8 - The ratchets mounted onto the frame using the same technique as the straps using the s/s hinge ends. The straps were tightened and the tank secured in it's nest.
    This week we'll mount the pump and do the usual plumbing. . .

    Stove Nest & Locker Doors [Again!]
    Stove and Doors.jpg
    1 - The propane stove arrived on Monday afternoon (as we reported on Tuesday, 4 May) so we had to make a nest for it so that it wouldn't rattle, be handy and ready for use;
    2 - As luck would have it - in our wood heap we had a contoured round edged SYP piece we'd made for our ill conceived hatch effort - and, with a slight modification it served well for the nest! The strap at the top is secured to the wall frames of the cabin using a fixed s/s screw on one end and a snap fastener at the other. The nest has a rubber lining to prevent abusing the stainless steel body of the stove the boat moves along, it's removed and set into it's nest after use. BTW, finishing of the wood with topside paint will be done this week;
    3 - Oh boy. . . we finally got to finish and mount the infamous stern locker doors we had issues with since post 255 back in 2 December, 2020! Another procrastinated project we couldn't "wrap our head around." This is the port locker door, and:
    4 - A shot of both lockers with their doors. . . as we look at them we're reminded of the old idiom - "The more things change, the more they stay the same." Amen!

    The Two Slat Sole
    Cockpit Sole.jpg
    1 - "Not with the wire hanger again!" [Christina Crawford - "Mommie Dearest"] That's how this one came across this week. The 2 slat sole piece has been kicked around a lot but as part of the must do list - we "got 'er done." This photo shows the two pieces sanded and refinished;
    2 - The crosspieces that holds them together and must align with the frames with a slight friction fit. This feature made for many trips to the cockpit to insure a good fit;
    3 - The slat piece ready for installation after a number of "trims" to fit tightly into place, and:
    4 - The cockpit sole finally fitted and finished - Wow what a hassle.

    And as Night Heron is nearing completion, we're at the berth and cabinet building phase, [4" foam mattress is due mid-May] the weather is becoming an obstacle - or so it seems. We hope weather is not your brake. . . especially for our friends in the Southern Hemisphere.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    Last edited by Kapiteinterzee; 05-09-2021 at 08:20 AM.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  24. #339
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    South Patrick Shores, USA
    Posts
    762

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by Kapiteinterzee View Post
    This was our latest effort to use what was in the wood heap in lieu of running to the box store to buy more wood;
    Absolutely!!! Great minds think alike!

    Keep up the great work, it won't be long now!
    “Retiring feels like death of self, but I'm looking forward to the rebirth - The opportunity to re-imagine my purpose.”

    Michael Bennett

  25. #340
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    332

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by FishoutaFlorida View Post
    Absolutely!!! Great minds think alike!

    Keep up the great work, it won't be long now!
    Hello Eric,
    Thank you for your note - it's appreciated!

    BTW, the "Wood Heap" is where all the cabinets, shelves, trim pieces, cosmetic plates and covers will come from as we near completion of Night Heron.

    Wood Heap.jpg

    It may take us a bit of time to laminate and scarf wood - but, why buy more wood when the heap has most of the materials cut to size(?)

    And the effort continues. . .

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  26. #341
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Berlin, Germany
    Posts
    807

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Having been away form this forum for a while, I was delighted to be able to find a few hours' reading this thread. What a magnificent job!
    When the building story is done, I assume we shall have some cruising stories. Alligators, herons and the like make for good (tall-) tale material and Florida is a great background setting.
    Thanks a gazillion for letting us follow your exploits, even if some, like me, will probably never build a boat ourselves. It take me all my time to keep my wooden dinghy in a sailable condition.
    Here's wishing you a wonderful summer and no red-tape problems with the "real" inspector.
    Cheers,
    Gernot H.

  27. #342
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    332

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by 62816inBerlin View Post
    Having been away form this forum for a while, I was delighted to be able to find a few hours' reading this thread. What a magnificent job!
    When the building story is done, I assume we shall have some cruising stories. Alligators, herons and the like make for good (tall-) tale material and Florida is a great background setting.
    Thanks a gazillion for letting us follow your exploits, even if some, like me, will probably never build a boat ourselves. It take me all my time to keep my wooden dinghy in a sailable condition.
    Here's wishing you a wonderful summer and no red-tape problems with the "real" inspector.
    Cheers,
    Gernot H.
    Hallo Gernot,
    Danke für lhre netten worte.

    As the build comes to an end, we hope to close this thread with our first overnighter report on the good and not so good characteristics of the Night Heron's design.

    Here on the Sun Coast, especially on the pristine Myakka River, many people do not enjoy the river as much as might be imagined - fishing is the big thing and most boats exist to serve that purpose. We're cruisers and as such we hope to cruise the river and it's few tributaries as far as we can go with a flat bottomed boat. The Sun Coast Keys will also be on our list - like those small beaches that can only be reached by flat bottomed boats!

    By the way, you too, Gernot, can build your own boat! We'll be 77 years old in October - so you have no age excuse. You can build it in your garage or if you don't have a garage - outdoors. If you live in an apartment you can build it in your living room! [Yes, some people have built a boat in their living rooms.] Ein boot zu bauen ist erfullend und freudig.

    Here are the talltales, or is it long tails, and scenery we'll be reporting on our last post:

    Faces
    Faces .jpg

    Myakka and Peace Rivers
    Myakka and Peace Rivers.jpg

    Only Accessible by Boat
    Only Accessible by Boat.jpg

    Keep in touch. . . we're near the end and we appreciate your comments as they provide an opportunity for us to post creatively.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  28. #343
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    332

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Sunday, 16 May 2021
    Weekly Build Update

    Hello Everyone,
    It was an excellent weather week on the Sun Coast for working outside but a drudgery "in-cockpit" experience for people with normal skeletal joints. Did you ever feel that your hands should have been connected to a universal joint with 360° free movement?

    So, we had a bum week measuring wire runs, cutting a few lines too short, stripping, tinning, soldering, crimping connectors and burning a few fingertips. The only joy we got was when the multi-meter indicated that the correct wire was connected to the correct terminal. . . anyhow, here is our week in very few photos:

    Electrical Wiring Week
    Electrical Wiring Week.jpg
    1 - The on/off illuminated 5 switch strip was soldered to the fuse holders and the cigarette lighter socket used for GPS and Phone charging only as we're non-smokers;
    2 - The positive and negative terminal blocks were connected to the soldered fuses using crimped connectors. Terminal blocks makes connecting devices and lights easier to connect as all that's needed are crimped connectors on the device wire. For weather protection we use shrink tubing for soldered connections and CRC 06026 Corrosion Inhibitor sprayed on the connector blocks;
    3 - The fuel pump electrical feed was "home-runned" from the pump to the battery box, on it's own circuit, and;
    4 - The circuit was fuse protected (fuse holder inside the battery box) and provided with an on/off toggle switch [arrow].

    Odds and Ends
    Odds and Ends.jpg
    1 - Besides a lot of wiring and such, we did a few (very few) tasks such as locating and installing with s/s screws and 5200 the deck water fill;
    2 - The queen size [please, no puns with this one] foam mattress arrived on Friday and we're awaiting the 48 hour decompression period to begin detailing it's form prior to trimming to size and sewing a cover. Yes, the cuddy cabin is long enough for a queen size mattress - width is another issue;
    3 - The long box next to the mattress in #2, above, shows the disassembled bimini we found on line for Night Heron. As everyone knows - the tropical sun has no mercy on people in boats, especially us who are follicly challenged. The Night Heron will eventually have a hard helm station as we've drawn and shown in previous posts. . . but for now we'll be using this bimini. The bimini, as noted in those previous postings, will be incorporated into the future hard helm station - so this is not a temporary fix, and;
    4 - We had no more build photos to fill this collage as wiring became the norm. . . so we shot a photo of the latest addition to Night Herons fan-base. . . a youngster we believe is The Supervisor's offspring as he/she is tolerated to stand on either side of the cockpit cap-rail without suffering exile.

    That was our week - wiring the build, sweating like crazy, and wishing we hadn't built a boat with so many nooks and crannies. . . hope you had a better one.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  29. #344
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    SW Washington/ At Sea
    Posts
    478

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Looking good! The region that you're planning to explore sounds pretty amazing.

    Here on the Sun Coast, especially on the pristine Myakka River, many people do not enjoy the river as much as might be imagined - fishing is the big thing and most boats exist to serve that purpose. We're cruisers and as such we hope to cruise the river and it's few tributaries as far as we can go with a flat bottomed boat. The Sun Coast Keys will also be on our list - like those small beaches that can only be reached by flat bottomed boats!
    Here on the columbia river it is much the same...most of the other boaters are zooming around in aluminum 'fish slayers' that are not very aesthetically pleasing but very functional. People ask me what I'm doing, if I'm fishing, taking pictures of birds, tubing, etc. and are kind of bewildered that I am just exploring the sloughs and back channels of the river and its tributaries. There are many folks that like to explore in small craft here, with centerboard sailboats and oar powered craft...very cool. Someday I'd like to take my completed boat project across country and explore some of the lakes and rivers I see here on the forum.

  30. #345
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    332

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by Powerwagon View Post
    Looking good! The region that you're planning to explore sounds pretty amazing.

    Here on the Columbia river it is much the same...most of the other boaters are zooming around in aluminum 'fish slayers' that are not very aesthetically pleasing but very functional. People ask me what I'm doing, if I'm fishing, taking pictures of birds, tubing, etc. and are kind of bewildered that I am just exploring the sloughs and back channels of the river and its tributaries. There are many folks that like to explore in small craft here, with centerboard sailboats and oar powered craft...very cool. Someday I'd like to take my completed boat project across country and explore some of the lakes and rivers I see here on the forum.
    Hello Powerwagon,
    Thank you for your comments - appreciate them a lot.

    We agree with your take on the "fish slayers." We also admit that we found the term so apropos that we made it a part of our lexicon.

    We really liked your idea of cruising lakes and rivers across the USA. . . a "bucket list" perhaps? We never thought of it but now that you brought it up; we just might do that too.

    However, we first have to do our "backyard" to test the boat and ourselves. . . attached is the map of Port Charlotte Bay and the local preserves (in green); we plan on starting with the Myakka River (large arrow), Peace River (Second largest arrow), Punta Gorda, the small islets, and the Keys leading to the Gulf.

    Charlotte Harbor Cruise.jpg

    We wish you the best adventures fellow cruiser. . . [BTW, does this mean we have to change forums after the builds are finished and we go cruising?]

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  31. #346
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    SW Washington/ At Sea
    Posts
    478

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    My folks are about your age and still live aboard their motorsailer. I grew up cruising onboard and we travelled the west coast from alaska to mexico. Before I was around they sailed to the south pacific (early 70s) and hawaii. They have a C-Dory they do their river cruising in, because the motorsailer has too much draft and air draft with the masts. I'm not familiar with that area of florida but it looks pretty spectacular, I think I may have to explore it sometime. There is a nature refuge near my place so it is full of migratory birds and local critters (no gators!).

  32. #347
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    332

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by Powerwagon View Post
    My folks are about your age and still live aboard their motorsailer. I grew up cruising onboard and we travelled the west coast from alaska to mexico. Before I was around they sailed to the south pacific (early 70s) and hawaii. They have a C-Dory they do their river cruising in, because the motorsailer has too much draft and air draft with the masts. I'm not familiar with that area of florida but it looks pretty spectacular, I think I may have to explore it sometime. There is a nature refuge near my place so it is full of migratory birds and local critters (no gators!).
    Hello Powerwagon,
    It's always good communicating with an ex-cruiser as, and we're sure we'll get flak for this, the perspective on boat features for the build are different. Once you do blue-water, your experiences dictate what is good for you and in spite of the naval architect's drawings, what is not. In essence, you take the best of the design you plan on building and change it to suit your particular circumstances.

    When we moved here we entertained buying a "river cruiser" but found that the market for these was almost nil and as was the offerings. When the marine muse hit us, we decided to build our own, to our needs. [BTW, we looked at C-Dory but for us - draft was the issue.]

    The Sun Coast, as well as the Southwest coast of the peninsula is a cruiser's heaven and many would say - haven. We do nature too and these are on our list as well. Here is that area to whet your appetite:

    Southern Florida.jpg

    Have a great summer cruising.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  33. #348
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    332

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Sunday, 23 May, 2021
    Weekly Build Update

    Hello Everyone,

    We're almost ashamed to post this week's update as the content is very slim. . . blame it on the weather - winds all week in the 15 knot sustained to 27 knot gusts made for little backyard work.

    It was so bad that we had to batten down the tarp and make a cocoon of it. Even our feathered friends used the Jeep's cargo crossbars, parked inside the carport for shelter.

    Here's our meager offering for the week:

    The Berth's Mattress
    The Berth.jpg
    1 - The foam mattress arrived in a small box, compressed, so that it needed 48 hours to reconstitute itself. So, after that occurred on Monday, we went at it with straight edges and magic markers to lay out the shape we needed to conform to the shape inside the cabin. Not having a workbench, we used our dining/living room floor to do the work on aching knees;
    2 - Three hours later we had the shape we needed using a razor sharp knife that had to be re-sharpened every few cuts! That box at the top of the photo is the one we got the mattress in;
    3 - The cover fabric we purchased, an exterior blend for furniture (not "Sunbrella") was cut to size after repeated "oh [expletive deleted]" as our lines did not line up. A few sketches and hours later, the better half and we agreed on a direction to cut and sew the cover, and:
    4 - Our old sewing machine was set up on our home-built Gerrit Rietveld table to begin the sewing process.

    Other Stuff
    Other Stuff.jpg
    1 - The berth cover in almost finished condition after the first seams were sewn. Here the better half is "tightening" the fabric around the shape so as to have a "military firm" cover that can take a coin tossed on it and spring it back;
    2 - The "production of White Oak slats" began in earnest this week before the winds made it impossible to cut the gifted floor boards to usable dimensions. We managed to cut about 18 slats before the wind forced us to move the table saw back to the storage closet;
    3 - Another break in the wind speed on Saturday provided an opportunity to cut and secure the berth's starboard rail. The port rail will be mounted this coming week, and:
    4 - We took the opportunity to finish the stove nest by installing the s/s snap button, top arrow, and painting the bottom securing crossbar.

    And that was it. . . we did do a lot of doodling when our mattress cover sewing skills were not required [oh boy, when the better half reads this we'll be in the doghouse, or maybe sleeping the unfinished cabin as we don't have a dog.] We made new sketches for "re-layout" of the electrical circuit, plumbing system and the reconfigured cuddy cabin to reflect the "as built."

    This coming week looks real promising as the television weather liars project a great weather week consistent with outdoors activities - no rain, low humidity and warm but not chocking hot temperatures.

    Stay tuned.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  34. #349
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Berlin, Germany
    Posts
    807

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by Kapiteinterzee View Post
    Hallo Gernot,
    Danke für lhre netten worte.

    As the build comes to an end, we hope to close this thread with our first overnighter report on the good and not so good characteristics of the Night Heron's design.

    Here on the Sun Coast, especially on the pristine Myakka River, many people do not enjoy the river as much as might be imagined - fishing is the big thing and most boats exist to serve that purpose. We're cruisers and as such we hope to cruise the river and it's few tributaries as far as we can go with a flat bottomed boat. The Sun Coast Keys will also be on our list - like those small beaches that can only be reached by flat bottomed boats!

    By the way, you too, Gernot, can build your own boat! We'll be 77 years old in October - so you have no age excuse. You can build it in your garage or if you don't have a garage - outdoors. If you live in an apartment you can build it in your living room! [Yes, some people have built a boat in their living rooms.] Ein boot zu bauen ist erfullend und freudig.

    Here are the talltales, or is it long tails, and scenery we'll be reporting on our last post:

    Keep in touch. . . we're near the end and we appreciate your comments as they provide an opportunity for us to post creatively.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    Thanks for the encouraging words!
    My wife and I enjoyed a stay in the Keys some years ago, including paddling through the mangroves.
    I "grew up" in the Caribbean and Florida almost felt like home.
    Your German reads good ... have you learned the language or are you using machine translation? (A professional question, just out of interest - my wife and I earned most of our living as translators).
    As to building a boat, I've no doubt that I COULD do it, but with three grandchildren and lots of other hobbies, I think I'll stick to maintaining existing boats and enjoying the sailing.
    Maybe if one of the kids gets really keen ... ? An Opti?
    If you're interested, I manage the Mirror Dinghy Discussion Forum (https://mirrordiscussforum.org) and have linked some of my cruise/messabout reports in English (I am slightly better in in English than in German) on the "Documents" page there.
    Cheers and looking foreward to seeing more about your exploits.
    Happy Whitsun (I'm not religious).
    Gernot H.

  35. #350
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    North Port, Florida, USA
    Posts
    332

    Default Re: The Birth of the Night Heron

    Quote Originally Posted by 62816inBerlin View Post
    Thanks for the encouraging words!
    My wife and I enjoyed a stay in the Keys some years ago, including paddling through the mangroves.
    I "grew up" in the Caribbean and Florida almost felt like home.
    Your German reads good ... have you learned the language or are you using machine translation? (A professional question, just out of interest - my wife and I earned most of our living as translators).
    As to building a boat, I've no doubt that I COULD do it, but with three grandchildren and lots of other hobbies, I think I'll stick to maintaining existing boats and enjoying the sailing.
    Maybe if one of the kids gets really keen ... ? An Opti?
    If you're interested, I manage the Mirror Dinghy Discussion Forum (https://mirrordiscussforum.org) and have linked some of my cruise/messabout reports in English (I am slightly better in in English than in German) on the "Documents" page there.
    Cheers and looking foreward to seeing more about your exploits.
    Happy Whit sun (I'm not religious).
    Gernot H.
    Hello Gernot,

    Glad to know you and your wife spent time in the Southern Florida Keys. . . so when we write about them, you'll know what we're referring to.

    My mother was Dutch/German or German/Dutch as her mother was from the disputed Netherlands/German Frisian area that went back and forth between both countries for centuries. As a result, we have relatives in both countries! Mom taught us German North Frisian that is very much a Low German language. A more formal German, or Hochdeutsch, was also spoken by Mom when she talked to relatives in Oldenburg.

    My German is loaded with grammatical errors as it's not my first language! I still have issues with the datives and genitives. Now you know how a New York born, raised and educated old guy got into German.

    OK, so you don't anticipate building a boat. . . how about a canoe? Or, a kayak? Anyway, enjoy sailing those beautiful lakes around Berlin - our favorite is the Großer Müggelsee - we sailed it a few decades ago.

    We're Lutherans. . . so thank you for your kind thoughts. . . and we too are not religious although we had to read the 95 theses when we were taken to Sunday School as youngsters!

    BTW, we'll check out your Dinghy Discussion Forum after we post this answer.

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

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