Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 35 of 68

Thread: 24' "viking" longship

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Vienna, Virginia
    Posts
    47

    Default 24' "viking" longship

    anyone know of a set of plans for a 24-28' viking looking plywood boat? knarr, longship, perhaps even something like a really big faering (pretty sure theres a 6 oar version of a faering but the name is slipping my mind).

    Just something that looks vikingy i'm ok with. as long as the curves have the look and i can build it from plywood. i've read about Bolger Design 572 but cant find any info (and its 38' which is more than i want to get into but maybe scaled down?)

    anyhow, any help would be appreciated. I think it would be a fun project for a group i'm in. I'd be interested in setting up a square rig sail setup as well but honestly its more likely to be motored along by an outboard than rowed or sailed.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Vienna, Virginia
    Posts
    47

    Default Re: 24' "viking" longship

    Seksæring.jpg

    Seksæring


    apparently this is the 6 oared version of the faering. still doesnt look quite big enough though. i want something that can hold 8-10 people for short trips.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    4,916

    Default Re: 24' "viking" longship

    There is an earlier thread on a similar subject here. Might have some useful info:

    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...vegian-fairing
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    4,916

    Default Re: 24' "viking" longship

    Also this one.

    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...r-sail-and-oar

    The CLC faering plans are available although it's a bit shorter than what you are looking for.
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    St. Helens, Oregon
    Posts
    3,218

    Default Re: 24' "viking" longship

    Check out the Open Source program for the Gislenge Ship: https://exarc.net/issue-2016-4/ea/gi...t-and-new-idea

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    4,916

    Default Re: 24' "viking" longship

    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh MacD View Post
    Check out the Open Source program for the Gislenge Ship: https://exarc.net/issue-2016-4/ea/gi...t-and-new-idea

    Now that is VERY cool! Not for the beginner I think though. It seems like it would take a lot of work to translate those plans into something one could use to build a boat. (Not making any assumptions about the OP's experience here - just an observation).
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    St. Helens, Oregon
    Posts
    3,218

    Default Re: 24' "viking" longship

    True 'nuff. Beyond my skill level and time frame, but very cool I saw that John Harris is also working on a set of plans for a stitch & glue version of the same hull. Won't be quite traditional and it won't be cheap, but it'll be more affordable than finding oak plank stock and it'll be a whole lot lighter! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MgWVXjZpnR4

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    4,916

    Default Re: 24' "viking" longship

    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh MacD View Post
    True 'nuff. Beyond my skill level and time frame, but very cool I saw that John Harris is also working on a set of plans for a stitch & glue version of the same hull. Won't be quite traditional and it won't be cheap, but it'll be more affordable than finding oak plank stock and it'll be a whole lot lighter! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MgWVXjZpnR4
    Hm - that would be just about perfect for the OP. Right length and everything.
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Walney, near Cumbria UK
    Posts
    53,747

    Default Re: 24' "viking" longship

    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh MacD View Post
    True 'nuff. Beyond my skill level and time frame, but very cool I saw that John Harris is also working on a set of plans for a stitch & glue version of the same hull. Won't be quite traditional and it won't be cheap, but it'll be more affordable than finding oak plank stock and it'll be a whole lot lighter! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MgWVXjZpnR4
    Very much a rowing and downwind sixareen. Not much ability to windward. Nice plywood recreation though. Very nice.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
    The weakness of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Southeast MA, USA
    Posts
    156

    Default Re: 24' "viking" longship

    http://www.thewoodenboatschool.com/b...titch-glue.php is a class on building this boat. I don't know if it is full or not.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Vienna, Virginia
    Posts
    47

    Default Re: 24' "viking" longship

    thanks guys! i had seen those older threads but and while full of info they didnt quite match up to what i was looking for. the youtube video about the John Harris design, thats more along the lines. I'm not surprised someone has decided to do this in ply. I know its been done before but plans are nonexistant.

    see here:

    https://www.ocregister.com/2015/10/1...-viking-pride/
    viking plywood.jpg

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Walney, near Cumbria UK
    Posts
    53,747

    Default Re: 24' "viking" longship

    They never get the planking at the stem and stern hood ends right.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
    The weakness of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Vienna, Virginia
    Posts
    47

    Default Re: 24' "viking" longship

    Totally agree, the originals are works of art.

    But im going for historically accuresque. If i can get 80% of the look and function for 20% of the effort... well, thats for me.

    Edited: What makes you think that the ply design would be rowing or downwind only?
    Last edited by Eciton; 02-16-2020 at 10:04 AM.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Walney, near Cumbria UK
    Posts
    53,747

    Default Re: 24' "viking" longship

    Quote Originally Posted by Eciton View Post
    Totally agree, the originals are works of art.

    But im going for historically accuresque. If i can get 80% of the look and function for 20% of the effort... well, thats for me.

    Edited: What makes you think that the ply design would be rowing or downwind only?
    Hardly any salient keel. You have seen the photos of my Peerie Maa on one of the linked threads. She has 6 inches of keel below 4 inches deep hollow garboards on an overall length of 18foot.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
    The weakness of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    St. Helens, Oregon
    Posts
    3,218

    Default Re: 24' "viking" longship

    I suspect that tacking angles would improve with a lug rig, but the square rig would limit you to about 60-65 degrees of true wind...basically a close reach. If I recall reading info on the Sea Stallion correctly she would tack through about 100-120 degrees...and that's with lots more waterline. If you're thinking of sailing on the Potomac you could find yourself doing a lot of tacking depending on the wind and current

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Walney, near Cumbria UK
    Posts
    53,747

    Default Re: 24' "viking" longship

    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh MacD View Post
    I suspect that tacking angles would improve with a lug rig, but the square rig would limit you to about 60-65 degrees of true wind...basically a close reach. If I recall reading info on the Sea Stallion correctly she would tack through about 100-120 degrees...and that's with lots more waterline. If you're thinking of sailing on the Potomac you could find yourself doing a lot of tacking depending on the wind and current
    I do not rate Sea Stallions skipper much. I read that he was a deepwater modern boat racing skipper. I do not think that he bothered to read anything about how Norse or Shetland boats were handled. He set the rig up too tight and so continually broke the shroud needles. He did not have the whit to have some of the crew forward rowing to keep her head to seas when repairing the rig or hove too and probably made other errors due to his ignorance.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
    The weakness of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    St. Helens, Oregon
    Posts
    3,218

    Default Re: 24' "viking" longship

    I hadn't heard that. I wonder if that contributed to some of her structural issues they're repairing now? I really have no idea what the lifespan of longships was...but I'd think more than 17 years or so.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Walney, near Cumbria UK
    Posts
    53,747

    Default Re: 24' "viking" longship

    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh MacD View Post
    I really have no idea what the lifespan of longships was...but I'd think more than 17 years or so.
    U dunno about the Norse, but I do know that the Shetland sixareens were periodically disbanded by boring out the treenails fastening the frames. Any rotten wood was dealt with and then put back together.
    Last edited by Peerie Maa; 02-16-2020 at 02:15 PM.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
    The weakness of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Port Townsend WA
    Posts
    14,457

    Default Re: 24' "viking" longship

    Consider building your Little Viking Ship out of real wood rather than plywood! It will be stiffer and not flex as much as plwood has half of its grain at the wrong angle for planking a lapstrake hull and has a tendancy to produce a rather floppy boat because of that fact. In addtion if will be surprisingly heavy for its size for most plywood is close to that of white oak per cubic inch in weight. Okome ply is lighter, more expensive and low in rot resistance as well. Marine Plywood will make it into a heavy snake rather than a light dancing dragon and a costly one at that as you will need to cover it with either glass or Dynell to create a stronger and more water resistant surface. Check the comparitive prices between the two materials in your area. Also, remember that genuine tree wood is more pleasant to work with and the gains will be much easier to shape!
    Jay
    Last edited by Jay Greer; 02-17-2020 at 01:31 PM.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Walney, near Cumbria UK
    Posts
    53,747

    Default Re: 24' "viking" longship

    How flexible? Bearing in mind that Viking, Norwegian and Shetland boats are meant to wriggle and flex.
    The St Ayles rowing yoals are plywood.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
    The weakness of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web.

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Port Townsend WA
    Posts
    14,457

    Default Re: 24' "viking" longship

    We both know that Nick. That is one of the characteristics that make lapstrake hulls desirable to my way of thinking.
    But flex and flop are two different things!
    Jay

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    central cal
    Posts
    21,999

    Default Re: 24' "viking" longship

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    How flexible? Bearing in mind that Viking, Norwegian and Shetland boats are meant to wriggle and flex.
    The St Ayles rowing yoals are plywood.
    Yes. The anti-plywood tirades bore me.

    I won’t ever post another plywood boat build here.

    Ever.

    Peace,
    Robert

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Walney, near Cumbria UK
    Posts
    53,747

    Default Re: 24' "viking" longship

    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Greer View Post
    We both know that Nick. That is one of the characteristics that make lapstrake hulls desirable to my way of thinking.

    Jay
    More than that. I'm talking about waggling the sternpost and seeing the stem wiggle out of phase.
    The Gokstad replica that sailed the Atlantic to NY was observed to pant by about 6 inches and it moved through the seas.
    This blog is of interest.
    https://www.vikingeskibsmuseet.dk/en...e-sea-stallion
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
    The weakness of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web.

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Port Townsend WA
    Posts
    14,457

    Default Re: 24' "viking" longship

    In anwer Amish Rob and others who wish to argue, I thought we were here to help those who are not as experieinced as some of as are when it comes to certain aspects wooden boat construction. There can be no question that plywood is now a standard of the industry just as are fiberglass and epoxy resin construction. But how often do you read of a plywood subdeck rotting out under perfectly good teak decking and had to repair it for an owner who is shocked at the price to repair that which did not have to happen in so short a time. Have you ever checked the actual weight per cubic inches of Marine Plywood compared to other boat building woods? Do you really know what to expect from it as a boat ages? Have you ever tried to use plywood for making compound curves? And yes "Ragtime" is a big starboat made of plywood. I know the boat well! But it has had a heck of a lot of her hull replaced over the years! When is the last time you checked the inner core of a rotten plywood panel or hull plank that needs replacement to see how it was made and why it went bad? Have you ever been at sea and found that a plywood hull is cracking in an alarming manner?

    I will not post anymore personal opinions concerning plywood either Rob, as I know nothing about plywood after having to work with it for over seventy years! Of course you do know that I am also allergic to the resins used in it and have to resort to a chemical protection filter when I must work with it! Cough, wheeze and snort! I am not trying to pick a fight here but I do believe in telling the truth!
    I only tell facts for others to choose from as they wish! So, my friends, I will abstain from making comments concerning the truth concerning certain materials now used in boat construction that have been popularized by the hucksters of the advertising industry!
    Jay
    Last edited by Jay Greer; 02-18-2020 at 02:13 PM.

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    Cushing, Maine
    Posts
    4,134

    Default Re: 24' "viking" longship

    Since you are located in Virginia, and John Harris is in Annapolis, maybe you can work out some kind of deal if he wants to take his Gisengla to full size. I think it is a really useful size for groups and anticipate that other reenactment groups may want to do it. Plus it has an excellent pedigree.

    The challenge with using real wood is finding it in quality and thicknesses that would let you built it properly. I know my Åfjords faering has only 4 planks to the side, one with a lot of hollow carved in so would be really hard to find the wood needed to build it. The Hardanger style are harder with only 3 planks to the side. I know that ply is heavier: Joe Liener planked his mechanically fastened ducker in aircraft ply back in the late 40s. He said he had to drop to 5/16" to meet the weight of the 3/8" cedar.

    With all the issues of ply, it certainly has many people building as they can get the materials. John Gardner was a fan, experimenting with ply, doing some designs for it as he recognized the problem. That said I never could get him to do a materials list for one of his plans that speced out how many board feet of xxx you needed. For a pro or for someone with ready access to a supplier this is not an issue.
    Ben Fuller
    Ran Tan, Liten Kuhling, Tipsy, Tippy, Josef W., Merry Mouth, Imp, Macavity, Look Far, Flash and a quiver of other 'yaks.
    "Bound fast is boatless man."

  26. #26
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Walney, near Cumbria UK
    Posts
    53,747

    Default Re: 24' "viking" longship

    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Fuller View Post
    Since you are located in Virginia, and John Harris is in Annapolis, maybe you can work out some kind of deal if he wants to take his Gisengla to full size. I think it is a really useful size for groups and anticipate that other reenactment groups may want to do it. Plus it has an excellent pedigree.

    The challenge with using real wood is finding it in quality and thicknesses that would let you built it properly. I know my Åfjords faering has only 4 planks to the side, one with a lot of hollow carved in so would be really hard to find the wood needed to build it. The Hardanger style are harder with only 3 planks to the side. I know that ply is heavier: Joe Liener planked his mechanically fastened ducker in aircraft ply back in the late 40s. He said he had to drop to 5/16" to meet the weight of the 3/8" cedar.

    With all the issues of ply, it certainly has many people building as they can get the materials. John Gardner was a fan, experimenting with ply, doing some designs for it as he recognized the problem. That said I never could get him to do a materials list for one of his plans that speced out how many board feet of xxx you needed. For a pro or for someone with ready access to a supplier this is not an issue.
    Well although the Gokstad faering at 21' overall was built with only 3 strakes, Eciton is looking for a smsll version of the big ocean-going vessels that will have a dozen or so strakes a side. Quite feasible in European larch or ply.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
    The weakness of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web.

  27. #27
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Walney, near Cumbria UK
    Posts
    53,747

    Default Re: 24' "viking" longship

    See if the Roskilde museum can provide drawings. This is the small cargo vessel
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
    The weakness of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web.

  28. #28
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    Cushing, Maine
    Posts
    4,134

    Default Re: 24' "viking" longship

    Having worked with some of the re-enactment groups, one of the requirements that they have is the ability to trailer the boat around. The biggest boat that they can trail. The six oared boats are almost the ideal size. Another reason to pay attention to the Gislenge boat. Skuldeve 3 is a goodly amount larger and I suspect would be a challenge to dry sail.
    Ben Fuller
    Ran Tan, Liten Kuhling, Tipsy, Tippy, Josef W., Merry Mouth, Imp, Macavity, Look Far, Flash and a quiver of other 'yaks.
    "Bound fast is boatless man."

  29. #29
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Between Bourgeoisie and Proletariat - Australia
    Posts
    5,945

    Default

    It'd be great to build everything out of 'real' wood. But where the hell does one get the material?

    Not round here, that's for sure.

    Maybe if you're in an Acorn to Arabella scenario you're good. Otherwise, it's ply IMHO.


    Thumbs up to trailering/storing. Where will the boat be kept?
    No sail? If you can build the boat, a mast and spars is a soupçon of urine. And WAY more fun.




    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  30. #30
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Walney, near Cumbria UK
    Posts
    53,747

    Default Re: 24' "viking" longship

    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Fuller View Post
    Having worked with some of the re-enactment groups, one of the requirements that they have is the ability to trailer the boat around. The biggest boat that they can trail. The six oared boats are almost the ideal size. Another reason to pay attention to the Gislenge boat. Skuldeve 3 is a goodly amount larger and I suspect would be a challenge to dry sail.
    The form of Skuldeve 3 would scale down to 24 to 28 foot extremely well. You could also reduce the number of bottom strakes, merging two into on under the turn of the bilge,
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
    The weakness of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web.

  31. #31
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Valnesfjord, Norway
    Posts
    1,128

    Default Re: 24' "viking" longship

    Quote Originally Posted by Eciton View Post
    Just something that looks vikingy i'm ok with. as long as the curves have the look and i can build it from plywood.
    In my opinion is a simple solid wood flattie with clinker sides (I plan building one) is more vikingy than a plywood vikingship, unless its build for the Vikings on HBO! I believe the vikingy feel of the boat is in the sound, the structure, the tar smell, the nails etc. not in the silouette of the dragon head. But if its buildt for show, a movie or some other event I guess plywood is perfect. But you wont smell vikingy coming home to your wife

  32. #32
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Wilhelmshaven, Northwest Germany, Jade Bay at the North Sea Coast
    Posts
    145

    Default Re: 24' "viking" longship

    Hello Eciton,

    perhaps this one is better suited than a smaller version of Skuddelev No 3.

    The 6 planks Gokstad Faering.

    Faering-6m-joonised.jpg 8175041_orig.jpg db29c23b7248cc4c7171e3652a9aac57.jpg

    Plans are available from the Viking Ship Museum at Roskilde to be built with green oak

    Or from Flo Mo, who has drawn a version from plywood.

    http://flo-mo.weebly.com/boat-design-studies.html

    At least you can download the Plank offsets and build a model from thin Aircraft plywood.

    Have fun, Michel

  33. #33
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Penn yan, ny
    Posts
    50

    Default Re: 24' "viking" longship

    This is a beatle whaleboat made in lap epoxy. Plans from willet ansel’s book ( newport news museum boat). Great sailor and carries a crowd; ten on board for this photo.
    plenty of viking pedigree3A3C9BDF-8ABF-4A44-866A-39FC8A251C25.jpg
    28 feet, easy trailer launch.

  34. #34
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    626

    Default Re: 24' "viking" longship

    Any traditional scandinavian doubleender would have a lot more viking heritage and feel in it than a scaled down viking ship built from plywood.
    In many places even the terminology for the different parts of the boat are much the same today as it was 1000 years ago.

    Why don't you want to build from solid timber?
    Amateur living on the western coast of Finland

  35. #35
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Wilhelmshaven, Northwest Germany, Jade Bay at the North Sea Coast
    Posts
    145

    Default Re: 24' "viking" longship

    Quote Originally Posted by heimlaga View Post
    Why don't you want to build from solid timber?
    Thats quite easy to tell. If you have only limited woodworking experience it is impossible for an amateur to build a traditional klinker built double ender.

    Even educated boatbuilders are not trained to split trees and transform them into planks with an axe or to work with other viking boatbuilding techniques. These are skills of the past and subjekt for an experimantal - archeologist, not a boatbuilder of today.

    Quality of materials is the next thing. You will not find the quality of woods that are nessesary to build a viking ship for reasonable prices.

    But with a little training, marine plywood, Epoxy and a good plan a amateur boatbuilder can build a boat without problems.


    Have fun, Michel

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •