Page 3 of 7 FirstFirst ... 234 ... LastLast
Results 71 to 105 of 240

Thread: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

  1. #71
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    257

    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    The last book that I really like is called Best Anchorages of the Inside Passage by Anne Vipond and William Kelly.


    It's got a friendly tone, gives you some tips and tricks for each anchorage they recommend. They really just cover the ones they like best and don't try to be all encompassing. I like the stories and little sidebars. The pictures nicely show what makes the anchorage unique and the maps are useful without being either too cartoony or looking too much like a nautical chart.

    There are a few other cruising guides I looked at that I found to be too much like encyclopedic lists of anchorages. While useful in their own way, I decided not to bring those nor to review them here.

    What I'm looking forward to are finding the little river mouths and shallow ends of coves where the big boats can't go.

    A friend who rowed an umiak to Alaska told me a story where he beached the boat in one such place, put his cockpit tent up- it has one plastic window and he was sitting around reading a book when he heard a sound nearby. The window filled with brown fur. He made some rustling sounds and fortunately the bear associated with the brown fur ambled away. I want to see some bears too, but not while I'm on the land!
    Tales from the land and sea: http://terrapintales.wordpress.com/

  2. #72
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    257

    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    One last book note. There are several different paper versions of tide and current tables. I've used Captain Jack's before and liked the visual look of it. Very easy to understand. I've used some of the online sources too.

    For the first time, I bought Ports and Passes. It's adjusted for daylight savings time (I can't figure out why some of the others aren't). Everything in there is in tables.

    There area few charts showing the times to adjust for different passes and there are a couple of maps with annotations showing strategies for moving through Johnstone Strait.

    What's your favorite tide/current source?
    Tales from the land and sea: http://terrapintales.wordpress.com/

  3. #73
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Vancouver Island
    Posts
    2,202

    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    I use Ports and Passes from the beginnings of my cruising in the Discovery Islands and their info seems accurate enough. I navigate a 7 knot boat with 4' draft so my requirements are different than your own but we both benefit from back-eddies. The major narrows have charts or insets on a larger chart that show anticipated current flow in the area. These may help you sneak up on a tight spot for slack tide and this can be very useful when moving about in this area of strong currents and tight passages.

    Regarding bears, they can be encountered anywhere up there now. Good bear-spray is essential.

    Best of luck on your trip! / Jim

  4. #74
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    257

    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    I think I've pretty much gathered all the stuff I need now.

    I've even found a little time to post a few silly stories on my blog about what hats I'm bringing.

    Now I'm on to packing food. In order to wander widely and avoid buying marina food, I think I need three weeks worth of food.

    I think that's doable assuming I can find fresh water to filter. I'd like to avoid those awful backpacker's freeze dried packages. I'm hoping to find some bulk food mixes that will be palatable and nutritious.

    Has anyone found a source for stuff in bulk that is actually edible? Or a recipe.

    I remember Tom Pamperin posting about Thermos cooking. Would love to hear more about that.

    I did a little reading and tried it last week with lentils- that was a modest success, but was not inspiring.

    -Bruce
    Tales from the land and sea: http://terrapintales.wordpress.com/

  5. #75
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Gold Coast Australia
    Posts
    3,361

    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Bateau View Post
    I think I've pretty much gathered all the stuff I need now.



    Has anyone found a source for stuff in bulk that is actually edible? Or a recipe.

    -Bruce
    Personally I like porridge for breakfast .ordinary porridge can be cooked using hot water in a cup or better in a wide mouth thermos. Combined milk muesli banana or dried fruit. I also prefer high energy snack bars trail mix or anything that can be had on the run when singlehanded.

    Regarding bears you would have to be very lucky to see one .

  6. #76
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Salt Spring Island, BC
    Posts
    7,986

    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    Quote Originally Posted by auscruisertom View Post

    Regarding bears you would have to be very lucky to see one .
    Drop bears maybe, but much of the coast is crawling with the black variety.

    My recipe for oatmeal without milk;

    Bring water and raisins to a boil. Add oats, bring to a simmer, cover and extinguish the flame. Once it's cooked garnish with walnut pieces, maple syrup, butter (margarine for lactose intolerant me) and salt. Quick oats work best. Sticks to the ribs for hours, uses very little fuel.

  7. #77
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Vancouver Island
    Posts
    2,202

    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    Good bear-spray is essential. Don't be confused about that, you are entering into their kitchen at dinnertime. Be bear aware, up there, and have a great trip. / Jim

  8. #78
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Modesto, CA
    Posts
    460

    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Bateau View Post
    I think I've pretty much gathered all the stuff I need now.

    I've even found a little time to post a few silly stories on my blog about what hats I'm bringing.

    Now I'm on to packing food. In order to wander widely and avoid buying marina food, I think I need three weeks worth of food.

    I think that's doable assuming I can find fresh water to filter. I'd like to avoid those awful backpacker's freeze dried packages. I'm hoping to find some bulk food mixes that will be palatable and nutritious.

    Has anyone found a source for stuff in bulk that is actually edible? Or a recipe.

    I remember Tom Pamperin posting about Thermos cooking. Would love to hear more about that.

    I did a little reading and tried it last week with lentils- that was a modest success, but was not inspiring.

    -Bruce
    I am not sure what backpacking food you have tried recently, but my opinion (and food is very much a matter of personal opinion) is that freeze dried backpacking food is generally not bad. The big problem with it is that it is packed with calories which is important if you are carrying 20 to 40 pounds on your back for 15 to 20 miles a day. Although piloting a small boat is more strenuous than being a couch potato, backpacking food may be too high calorie.

    You may want to look in the grocery store for things like dried pasta alfredo, or dried soup mixes. You will find other options in the same section of the store.

    By the way, if you will be in bear territory, keep your food, toothpaste, etc. in a proper bear canister. Those critters are pretty adept at finding their way into anything but the best designed bear cans.

  9. #79
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    4,892

    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    The various shelf-stable, boil-to-heat packaged meals might be a good option for variety. I've had a few and they are decent. Not as good as fresh ingredients but far superior to the hiking food I remember from when I was a kid.

    https://www.amazon.com/Maya-Kaimal-F.../dp/B07DBZCHQD

    https://www.amazon.com/Loma-Linda-Bl.../dp/B07MMSCZ34

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B002JF62GU

    And also any number of DIY expedition food guides online

    https://www.theyummylife.com/Instant_Meals_On_The_Go

    https://blog.nols.edu/2016/04/20/how...kpacking-meals

    https://www.wonderlandguides.com/bac...ing-food-ideas

    There are also shelf-stable milk and dairy options for those of us who are emotionally dependent on our coffee-with-cream in the morning...
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  10. #80
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    257

    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    Good advice people Keep it coming!

    Useful bear site.
    Tales from the land and sea: http://terrapintales.wordpress.com/

  11. #81
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    257

    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    So continuing on the food vane. I LOVE BREAD. There I said it.

    The thought of being without bread make me sad. Sliced bread is fine for a trip, but only lasts so long.

    Fortunately, my wife both likes to cook and likes me.

    Therefore she has been testing out some flatbread recipes that can be made en route without too much work on the boat.

    I've made stick bread lots of times and that is wonderful- but it takes a fire on the beach.

    With a gas camp stove one can make flatbread. Masa- corn tortilla material is an easy option, but kind of plain.

    But for variety, my wife has been creating different recipes.


    The first one was salt, water, flour, and some toppings.


    It was OK; perhaps a little tough. Sort of like hardtack tortilla.
    Last edited by Bruce Bateau; 07-10-2019 at 09:55 PM.
    Tales from the land and sea: http://terrapintales.wordpress.com/

  12. #82
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Lilburn, Georgia, USA
    Posts
    287

    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Bateau View Post
    So continuing on the food vane. I LOVE BREAD. There I said it.

    The thought of being without bread make me sad. Sliced bread is fine for a trip, but only lasts so long.

    Fortunately, my wife both likes to cook and likes me.

    Therefore she has been testing out some flatbread recipes that can be made en route without too much work on the boat.

    I've made stick bread lots of times and that is wonderful- but it takes a fire on the beach.

    With a gas camp stove one can make flatbread. Masa- corn tortilla material is an easy option, but kind of plain.

    But for variety, my wife has been creating different recipes.

    The first one was salt, water, flour, and some toppings.

    It was OK; perhaps a little tough. Sort of like hardtack tortilla.
    Oh, Lordy, now you're in my wheelhouse! I was raised with the maxim, "If there's not bread, it's not a meal."

    It would be lovely if your wife would allow you to share her flatbread recipes!

  13. #83
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    257

    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    Here's recipe #1 - flat, flat, flat:
    1 cup flour
    a little less than 1/2 cup water
    1/2 teaspoon salt

    Stir it up, let sit for 15 minutes.

    Roll it out. Pat in sesame, poppy, maybe dried onions, a bit of salt.

    Cook on med-high heat in ungreased pan (cast iron is good) for 2 minutes.
    Tales from the land and sea: http://terrapintales.wordpress.com/

  14. #84
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    257

    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    Recipe 2 yields puffy, pita-like breads and is tastiest when fresh cooked.


    1/2 cup warm water
    1/2 teaspoon yeast
    about 1 cup flour, maybe a little more
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    2 tablespoons powdered milk

    Instructions:
    1. Dissolve yeast and milk in water.
    2. Add flour, let rise until about doubled in size (maybe 2 hours depending on temperature)
    3. Cook on medium flame about 2 minutes per side.
    Tales from the land and sea: http://terrapintales.wordpress.com/

  15. #85
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    257

    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    I'm less than a week out. Planning for being gone seems harder than being gone...

    Here's what expedition HQ looks like:


    Now I am asking myself, how exactly will all this fit in the boat?

    Tales from the land and sea: http://terrapintales.wordpress.com/

  16. #86
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    257

    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    Update : Packed the dry bags that work fine for a week and found how quickly they fill up. Next mission is to
    a. Get more dry bags
    b. Get rid of more stuff

    And I thought I was a bit of a minimalist. Apparently not.
    Tales from the land and sea: http://terrapintales.wordpress.com/

  17. #87
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Victoria, BC, Canada
    Posts
    1,498

    Smile Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Bateau View Post
    Update : Packed the dry bags that work fine for a week and found how quickly they fill up. Next mission is to
    a. Get more dry bags
    b. Get rid of more stuff

    And I thought I was a bit of a minimalist. Apparently not.
    Or
    c. Get a bigger boat
    Alex

    “A man in an open shirt, sat gazing out to sea; A young man, a hale man, and I wished that I were he and that the things that I loved were as they used to be”
    - Geoffrey Holdsworth

    http://www.alexzimmerman.ca

  18. #88
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Ballard
    Posts
    8,557

    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    I took way too much stuff on our northbound trip. Lots of lessons learned. I carry much less these days.
    Quote Originally Posted by James McMullen View Post
    Yeadon is right, of course.
    Quote Originally Posted by AJZimm View Post
    I basically copied what McMullen, Yeadon and Hvalsoe use because it worked so well.

  19. #89
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    847

    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    Hi Bruce, You're right about the planning.
    Have you read "Passage to Juneau" by Jonathan Raban? It would be a good book for you to take with you, if it fits in the boat.
    All the best for the trip.
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  20. #90
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    257

    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    Quote Originally Posted by IanMilne View Post
    Have you read "Passage to Juneau" by Jonathan Raban?
    Ian
    Interesting book Ian. I did read that one- I especially like his musings about art.

    I believe Raban lived in the Seattle area at some point. Was he a presence on the boat scene up there?
    Tales from the land and sea: http://terrapintales.wordpress.com/

  21. #91
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    257

    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    Quote Originally Posted by Yeadon View Post
    I took way too much stuff on our northbound trip.
    With two days to go, I'd value you restating what you would have left behind.


    I did a practice pack yesterday and found that the boat was pretty darn full.

    Then I got rid of some more stuff- the land tent, some extra food, a few more articles of clothing...

    But really, some portion of my problem is that I was disorganized. As I unloaded the tent, in its sausage-like stuff bag, I realized it was the perfect size to fit into my hatches.
    Tales from the land and sea: http://terrapintales.wordpress.com/

  22. #92
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    257

    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage


    Then it was back to the sewing machine. I had a bunch of scrap waterproof, sorta rubbery fabric, and sewed a several "splash bags" using regular thread, no sealed seams.

    The idea was that these long sausages (about 7" diameter and 36" long) with a draw cord at the top (and a label stating what's in the bag) would be fine inside my hatches where they might get some drips of water, but would be unlikely to get submerged. These store things in an organized fashion, like snacks in plastic bags, cooking equipment, rain gear, etc.

    Now what was once a mess of things, is easy to access.

    I will repack today and see what I really need to bring.
    Last edited by Bruce Bateau; 08-01-2019 at 06:25 PM.
    Tales from the land and sea: http://terrapintales.wordpress.com/

  23. #93
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    4,892

    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    Looking good Bruce! A couple of thoughts for what they are worth, and with the caveat that I have no actual experience with sail and oar cruising so I am just kibitzing here:

    1. Your storage bags look like they will stow well but I can see it being hugely annoying to get to the last pair of dry socks buried three feet down at the bottom of one. Especially five days in when you have unpacked and repacked the d**ned things twenty times already, and the last time you repacked you just shoved everything in regardless of organization. So what if you sew a divider at the mid point and leave an opening at each end? Then you have two smaller compartments in each one, making it easier to reach things.

    2. It looks like you have a five-gallon bucket, for purposes about which I will not speculate, but I wonder if a 3.5 gallon bucket would do as well? Easier to stow perhaps.

    As always, following with interest.
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  24. #94
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    springfield, missouri, usa
    Posts
    660

    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Bateau View Post
    I'm less than a week out. Planning for being gone seems harder than being gone...
    It is a good bit of the fun, though. Your trip really lasts the length of the trip itself, plus the planning faze. Since it's likely all you've though about, since you pulled the trigger. That's how I'd be.

    -Trevor

  25. #95
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Niagara, ONT Canada
    Posts
    438

    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    Large size ziplock freezer bags are pretty tough, at least for stuff that's not sharp, and reasonably waterproof. The dollar stores here (Dollarama) have fold up wash bowls and buckets in the camping section. However, when I pack lightish for "too many people in a small car" camping I pack the "kitchen" into the washbowl.
    2019: returning from being sidelined with medical probs, crossing fingers worst is over, still in "armchair enthusiast" mode for time being.

  26. #96
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    11,922

    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    Good for you, Bruce. I did a 28-day trip singlehanded in Rowan three years ago, and enjoyed having done it. I think you’re going to have a blast, but here’s a few thoughts I might add if you care:

    Make sure you pack along enough calories to stay warm, in case it rains. Emergency jars of peanut butter and bars of chocolate could save your life if you get hypothermic. I had a couple of patches of weather that absolutely sucked for days in a row. You should have plenty of food you can eat on board without cooking if it’s too stormy to want to beach your boat for hours and hours and hours on end. Fishing and crabbing and foraging is super fun when the weather permits, but I definitely had times when it wouldn’t have been any fun at all to plan on it for subsistence eating. I would think of it as merely a potential bonus.

    Don’t even bother taking a land tent. You’ll not want to leave your boat to her own devices overnight. You need to be on board when the current changes or when weather comes in. And that’s bear country up there to boot.

    Make sure your repair kit includes sail needles and thread and such. You’ll have more wear and chafe over a month of daily active use than you might expect.

    Reef early, reef often. Cowardice is golden when you’re all by your lonesome.

    Hope you have a wonderful time! Cheers to your upcoming adventure!

    Last edited by James McMullen; 08-03-2019 at 09:27 PM.

  27. #97
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    847

    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    Hi Bruce, You might be away by now. Sorry to be so late raising the subject of Jonathan Raban. He still lives in Seattle, as far as I know. There's plenty of stuff on the web about him, but it can wait until you get home, if you want to look it up.
    Bon voyage!
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  28. #98
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Trion, GA
    Posts
    189

    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    Has anybody heard from Bruce since he left, he may be back by now would like to hear about his trip.
    have a nice day------------AL

  29. #99
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    4,892

    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    I'm sworn to secrecy but I have access to Bruce's tracker and it shows him in the San Juan Islands right now. From his track it seems like he must be having the small boat cruise of a lifetime! I expect he will tell us all about it when he gets home.
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  30. #100
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    150

    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    I participated in this years Barefoot Raid, Aug 18 to 26, and Bruce met up with us while were in the waters around Cortez Island. It was great to see him, and he looked like a guy having the small boat cruise of a lifetime!

    (the raid was a blast, great sailing, great people, great food)

    Cheers,
    Dale

  31. #101
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Bellingham, Wa, USA
    Posts
    3,779

    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    I'm sworn to secrecy but I have access to Bruce's tracker and it shows him in the San Juan Islands right now. From his track it seems like he must be having the small boat cruise of a lifetime! I expect he will tell us all about it when he gets home.
    Quote Originally Posted by dsimonson View Post
    I participated in this years Barefoot Raid, Aug 18 to 26, and Bruce met up with us while were in the waters around Cortez Island. It was great to see him, and he looked like a guy having the small boat cruise of a lifetime!

    (the raid was a blast, great sailing, great people, great food)

    Cheers,
    Dale

    Looking forward to his report.
    There's the plan, then there's what actually happens.

    Ben Sebens, RN

    15' Welsford Navigator Inconceivable
    16' W. Simmons Mattinicus double ender ​Matty

  32. #102
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    1,801

    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    I have received a clandestine report delivered through arcane methods of old that Bruce B. is having a great adventure and "all good."

    Can't wait to get a glimpse of his journey! Hell yeah

  33. #103
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Victoria, BC, Canada
    Posts
    1,498

    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    Had coffee with Bruce last Thursday in Sidney. he was doing well so far and had some great stories, sketches and watercolours.
    Alex

    “A man in an open shirt, sat gazing out to sea; A young man, a hale man, and I wished that I were he and that the things that I loved were as they used to be”
    - Geoffrey Holdsworth

    http://www.alexzimmerman.ca

  34. #104
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    257

    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage



    Thanks for the inquiries and best wishes. Row Bird and I are in good health and in home port for some shore leave.

    Thank you to all the people who helped launch the expedition with advice, driving me and Row Bird places, lending me gear, or just telling me I could do it.

    While I am physically here, my mind is still out there someplace. I've never experienced anything as immersive, engaging, intense, profound, and deeply satisfying.

    I'm lucky to have a few more weeks off of work for some other forms of slow travel. I'm going to continue my journey south by bicycle and train. During that time I'll do some writing, flesh out my art ambitions, and just enjoy the delicious nothingness of travel.

    I'll post some things a bit later in the fall.

    -Bruce
    Tales from the land and sea: http://terrapintales.wordpress.com/

  35. #105
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    4,892

    Default Re: Small Boat on the Inside Passage

    Looking forward to it Bruce. That one photo is enough to keep me day dreaming for weeks.
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •