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Thread: Bolger Storm Petrel

  1. #1
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    Default Bolger Storm Petrel

    I have had a longtime fascination with Phil Bolger's Storm Petrel design, it would be no great performer under motor or sail but seems like a fun boat for just messing about. Here are some small images from the plan and links to Bolger's own description from SBJ, some neat 3D images, and a thread of mine about the same boat on another forum from several years ago.

    sp 1.jpgsp 2.jpg

    http://www.belljar.net/petrel.htm
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/hallman/tags/stormpetrel/
    https://www.boatdesign.net/threads/r...-petrel.50118/

    Does anyone have any first-hand experience with this boat or something similar? I have some ideas of my own on how I might tweak the design, but I'd welcome other input.

    Cheers,

    Matthew
    Last edited by cluttonfred; 04-25-2019 at 08:18 AM.
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    Default Re: Bolger Storm Petrel

    I misspent part of my youth sailing International Tempests, designed by Ian Proctor. The remarkable thing about those boats was that they had sealed bulkheads and cockpit so that they would not fill with water, and they had enough ballast so they always righted themselves. They were pretty remarkable boats, and one that inspired quite a bit of fearlessness because you knew you could always get home. I have long thought that ocean cruisers could be built somewhat the same way, unsinkable and self righting. Having gone through that thinking, I'm not sure I think the compromises of Bolger's Storm Petrel are worth the price. You could accomplish the same things starting someplace nicer and end up with a better boat.
    Even if being super cheap is your goal, there is enough useful trash which if converted with some thought and effort would produce an elegant and safe boat.

    SHC

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    Default Re: Bolger Storm Petrel

    No experience with Petrel, but I clearly remember watching the Oregon Coots trying to launch a Bolger Old Shoe on a volcanic lake -- it took about 8 of them and most had to wade chest deep to get it off the lee shore and free to sail. Not a fan of fixed keels, particularly on small open boats.

    "The enemies of reason have a certain blind look."
    Doctor Jacquin to Lieutenant D'Hubert, in Ridley Scott's first major film _The Duellists_.

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    Default Re: Bolger Storm Petrel

    Wow, you guys aren't exactly encouraging. Any alternatives to suggest of similar size, capability, and building difficulty?
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    Default Re: Bolger Storm Petrel

    Group therapy intervention probably isn't fun.

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    Default Re: Bolger Storm Petrel

    This is a longer boat but it would be easier to launch and have much better performance than the Petrel. I'm certain there are numerous other designs available that fit your criteria.

    https://www.clcboats.com/shop/boats/...g-cruiser.html

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    Default Re: Bolger Storm Petrel

    I have no experience with the Bolger Petrel, so take this for what its worth...Petrel is a 16 foot plywood sharpie type hull. It is going to use the roughly the same amount of material, cost roughly the same amount of money, and take roughly the same amount of time to build as other 16 foot sharpie type hulls. Many of those other designs will perform significantly better than Petrel. For ME, I PERSONALLY would want to build the highest performing, best handling boat that I could, for a given amount of money, time, and materials, so for me, Petrel would most likely not fit the bill.

    Now, what I am looking for in a boat may very well be different than what you are looking for in a boat. If Petrel ticks all of your boxes, so to speak, go for it.

    Like my aeromodeling mentor says, "you pays your money and makes your choice." At the end of the day, its your build and your boat. Build what you like.

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    Default Re: Bolger Storm Petrel

    While we could discuss length to beam ratios, topside buoyancy, advantages of waterballast, slow speed single chine inefficiency and many other things, fundamentally a small keelboat has to be achingly beautifull for all the extra trouble and depth restriction over a centerboard dinghy, to be worth it.



    Myself, I'd be looking at gluing a Brooks Somes Sound 12.5 together. I'd expect it to be pretty straightforward from CAD plans, fairly easy to obtain the Haven 12.5 lead keel, to be a joy to sail and to hold my eyes from every angle before having to recover her. I'd justify it to my partner (if I had too) saying she's worth more finished than I spent on materials. I coudn't say if it's self righting, but it would take enormous inattention and lack of planning to get her into that situation if used in typical summer good weather. I'd be happy knowing she would always attract the right sort even if temporarily down on her luck, and would probably be still sailing in 100 years.
    Last edited by Edward Pearson; 04-26-2019 at 10:47 AM.

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    Default Re: Bolger Storm Petrel

    While not quite as easily built as the Petrel, but much simpler than the Soames 12.5, you might think about something like Bedard's "RoG": https://www.bedardyachtdesign.com/de...micro-cruiser/ . There are quite a number of simply built, beachable, easily launched micro cruisers out there. Bolger started a movement, but his followers have carried the game to the next step and are worthy of reviewing. John Welsford, John Harris and B&B designs all have some extremely capable, readily built designs that should fit your criteria.

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    Default Re: Bolger Storm Petrel

    Sigh, I guess I forgot which forum we are on. I grew up around the water in New England, so I am quite familiar with beautiful boats that are floating works of art. That said, I am not retired, I have a family to support, and my work requires moving every few years, usually internationally.

    In those circumstances, plus not having a proper workshop, my projects have to be limited in scope and scale. Like it says in my signature, I have enjoyed building and using several simple Bolger/Payson plywood boats over the years, so I am familiar and comfortable with that method. Something like this would be a little bigger project but not that much bigger.

    I am not married to the idea of Storm Petrel, but by "something similar" I meant quick and easy construction, excellent stability for the size, modest performance under motor or sail, and a little space for dry storage or even solo camping if need be. I would welcome serious suggestions of alternatives that actually meet all or most those criteria.
    Last edited by cluttonfred; 04-26-2019 at 12:33 PM.
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    Default Re: Bolger Storm Petrel

    If you are thinking about Bolger designs, how about his 12 foot ply version of the Beetle Cat, "Bobcat."

    I have corresponded with several members here re. Bobcat, one of them in particular having vast experience with Bolger designs and thus the ability to be both knowledgeable of them as well as critical. I was told that of Surf, Teal, Gypsy, and Bobcat, Bobcat would be the only one worth building again (to paraphrase).

    A version of Bobcat has been built with a cuddy, if you are into that sort of thing.

    I have actually considered building Bobcat, and may do so one of these days. It fits the bill for both aesthetics (in my mind) and performance for what it is.

    Also, along similar lines are Michalaks "Skat" which is a stitch and glue version of the "Snowbird/Olympic" catboat used in the Olympics in the '30's (iirc). Have heard its also a decent boat, though more of a day sailor as opposed to cruiser (though I see no reason why a small cuddy could not be added...but a designer/naval architect should probably be consulted before committing to that mod.)



    I would think either of the above could accommodate a small gasoline or battery operated trolling type motor to get you around when the wind falls off.



    Oh, and Ed: That picture of "Skyla" is the inspiration for my next pencil sketch. Simply gorgeous. Thanks for posting.

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    Default Re: Bolger Storm Petrel

    I wonder if the "Bobcat" could be done with leeboards to better accommodate the occasional camping opportunity? Combined with a small dodger or boom tent that might be a good setup for you. Oboy! More research

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    Default Re: Bolger Storm Petrel

    There are probably 100's of designs that could meet what you want. Well except that goofy keel.

    You could add an outboard well to a design such as this. Selway Fisher
    DRAKE 18' SHARPIE

    A very simple 18’x 5’2’’ ply sharpie drawn with a simple unstayed sprit boom rig and a ply centreboard. Ideal for estuary cruising and an excellent ‘big’ boat for first time construction. In it’s basic form 10 sheets of 3/8’’ ply and 1 sheet of 1/2’’ ply are used.
    Drake 18' Sharpie Particulars
    LOA 18' 5.49m
    Beam 5'2" 1.58m
    Hull Mid Depth 1'6" 0.46m
    Draft 5"/2'2" 0.13/0.66m
    Sail Area 143 sq.ft 13.3 sq.m
    Approx. Dry Weight 441 lbs 200 kg
    Hull Shape
    Sharpie - flat bottom single chine
    Construction Method Ply on frame and stitch and tape
    Major plywood requirements for hull 10 sheets of 9mm + 1 sheet of 12mm Exterior or marine plywood
    Guidance Use 5 + adults
    Drawing/Design Package 2 x A1 drawings + 3 x A4 instruction sheets

    DRAKE 18' SHARPIE FULL PLANS COST
    UK/EU/US/Elsewhere - FULL PLAN £65
    (Approx. 78 Euros/$88 USD)

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    Default Re: Bolger Storm Petrel

    You might want to just buy a used boat. I always liked the Pearson Packet.
    https://sailboatdata.com/sailboat/packet-pearson

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    Default Re: Bolger Storm Petrel

    I'm not sure what the appeal of Storm Petrel is. If it is unsinkable and self righting, ten there are other ways to skin that cat which will sail better and be easier to manage. If you want to build a Bolger that hasn't been built, then go right ahead.
    I understand the quick and dirty mindset. I have at various times given myself a week to try something new. "On the seventh day he went yachting" If you aren't all uptight about building a legacy jewel box, you can get stuff done and use it while the 4th little pig is still fussing over the perfect way to start.
    SHC

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    Default Re: Bolger Storm Petrel

    Close to two decades ago, Phil Bolger sketched out a shallow draft version of the Storm Petrel for Steve Hansen. I don't think Steve ever built it, but I think that might be a good option for me if I end up where I hope to be next year. I think I'd do mine in 1/2" steel rather than wood and lead for the keel. See http://www.belljar.net/bolgersp.htm

    petrel3.gif
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    Default Re: Bolger Storm Petrel

    https://www.duckworks.com/product-p/jm-imb.htm He's got plenty more along the Bolger micro cruiser type. Same idea as Bolger's stuff just a more recent development and more people building them.

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    Default Re: Bolger Storm Petrel

    Michalak AF3 is a small sharpie, does not use a huge amount of materials, works well under oars,motor and sail....

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    Default Re: Bolger Storm Petrel

    If you're not set on a keel, I would second the AF3. 15.5 feet. Lots of storage room. Cuddy cabin big enough for one to sleep comfortably -- two, if you take down the mast and are good friends. (I moved the bulkhead 6-inches further toward the stern to provide a little more leg room while sleeping ). Rows reasonably well (I use 8-foot, homemade oars). Motors fine (I have a trolling motor side-mounted). Easy to build using Bolger/Payson methods.

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    Default Re: Bolger Storm Petrel

    Greetings Matthew, you're in luck, I may be the only person to have any first-hand experience building and living with a Bolger Storm Petrel.

    I moved to the San Francisco Bay area in 1989 and partially due to the high cost of living, bought a Columbia 45 to live and sail on. I still live on the water (now in a floating home) but but then I also wanted something small enough to sail single-hand after work.

    I was fortunate enough to find copies of The Folding Schooner, 30 Odd Boats and Different Boats in a used book store. They really opened my eyes. I was even more fortunate to actually speak with Dynamite Payson a few times and exchanged letters with Phil too. I would write to him asking for plans for boats I admired (Black Gauntlet, Breakdown Schooner and especially Rhondo II) and Phil would explain how inferior they were compared to his newer ideas and try to sell me some a new idea he had. I still have some of those letters and drawings.

    I ended up building several Bolger designs; a Gypsy that I thoroughly enjoyed and was the marina's favorite dinghy, a Car Topper I used as a tender and best of all, a Storm Petrel. Phil told me he thought mine was the only one ever actually built and asked for pictures.

    The Storm Petrel was everything Phil said it would be. Painted tan with a red sail, it was charming and got countless compliments. One of my live-a-board neighbors even said it was his ideal of the perfect small boat.

    Phil was right, the Petrel was a dull sailor, but over the years I managed to improve her upwind performance with a heavier spit and by moving the main-sheet from the cockpit to the top of the rudder. My final improvement was the addition of the tiny head-sail from a SF Pelican on a little, removable bowsprit. She was extremely stable; even on our windy bay. On calm sunny days I'd sail her from the Oakland estuary to SF, half-dozing in the cockpit, feeling totally secure.

    As far as sailing performance was concerned, she pointed better than a SF Pelican (which I've since owned) and was about as fast as a 17' West Right Potter. She was fun to row (in a straight line) but murder to turn. She was a blast to motor with a 3 to 5 hp outboard. The interior was laughably small, but cozy and felt very safe when battened down.

    I absolutely enjoyed the Petrel and kept it for years, until a divorce forced me to downsize and my marina wanted to start charging me a slip fee for it (I argued that the Petrel was more like a dingy since it fit in the slip alongside the Columbia). It broke my heart to sell her. Even worse, the last time I saw her--side-tied in Emeryville--she'd been repainted a ridiculous red. That was about 15 years ago and I even though I've looked, haven't seen her since. I'm guessing her bottom grew foul and she's probably gone.

    However, I still have plans (copied from Different Boats) and think often of building another. I currently own a 30' Roue 20, so building another Petrel would be more for the love of the boat than necessity, but I've learned so much about construction I think she'd be spectacular!

    I only have a couple pictures, (it was before digital and I sent most to Phil) but I could attach the ones I have if you're interested.

    Cheers!
    Peter Thelin

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    Default Re: Bolger Storm Petrel

    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Thelin View Post
    Greetings Matthew, you're in luck, I may be the only person to have any first-hand experience building and living with a Bolger Storm Petrel....
    Hello, Peter! I am sorry I missed this post when you wrote it as I am still very interested in Storm Petrel. I have some old, low-resolution photos of a Storm Petrel with spritsail and jib rather than the designed boomed lateen under the name Marc Lander and also in the San Francisco Bay area. Is this your boat and perhaps Marc Lander bought it from you?
    Attached Images Attached Images
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    Default Re: Bolger Storm Petrel

    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Thelin View Post

    I only have a couple pictures, (it was before digital and I sent most to Phil) but I could attach the ones I have if you're interested.

    Cheers!
    Peter Thelin
    That would be wonderful if you could upload them whatever way is best, and link here.
    I am mad keen on Storm Petrel, it'd be great to see more.

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    Default Re: Bolger Storm Petrel

    I am still fascinated by this little-known Bolger design. As some of the material previously online is no longer available, here is a link to Phil Bolger's original write-up from his book Different Boats.

    Storm Petrel (link to 2.7 MB pdf file)

    In subsequent posts I will also share some thoughts and drawings by the late Don Elliott from the old Yahoo! Groups "smallboats" list circa 2001 for future reference.
    Last edited by cluttonfred; 04-11-2021 at 04:40 PM.
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    Default Re: Bolger Storm Petrel

    The following thoughts and drawings by the late Don Elliott were posted to the Yahoo! Groups "smallboats" list back in 2001 as an analysis of the design and partly in response to Phil Bolger's description and rationale in the PDF I uploaded in my previous post. I am sharing Don's input here so it won't be lost as some of the thoughts are applicable to many other designs as well. Cheers, Matthew

    "Sat Feb 3, 2001 6:49am
    STORM PETREL'S FLOTATION NO. 1

    Let's look at Storm Petrel's flotation.

    Any boat that carries a dense material on board, such as lead, steel or even say a motor should have adequate flotation material on board to prevent the boat from sinking. Wooden boats without dense materials are an entirely different matter; here we are looking at Storm Petrel's flotation.

    The list below is a basic outline of what that flotation should be doing.

    1. It should prevent the boat from sinking.
    2. It should float the boat level.
    3. It should be of the correct amount.
    4. It should be located in the right place.
    5. It should be securely fixed.
    6. It should be the right material.
    7. It should allow the boat to be bailed in the case of total flooding.

    I'll bet that most boat builders, and for that matter most boaters give very little thought to flotation. They would undoubtedly think about it right away if they found their self in the situation shown in the sketch below:

    In this series of articles we hope to show that is indeed worth thinking about flotation. This article will give you an idea of how flotation is designed into a boat.

    Mr.Bolger designed Storm Petrel with 5 cubic feet of flotation material; he has placed 3 cubic feet aft and two cubic feet forward. Let's look at why he arranged it this way. See the Sketch below for the explanation:

    In the top view you can see by placing it high up in the boat, the boat floats at deck level. This position allows the boat to rotate back to the upright position if capsized. Now look at the lower view, the floatation material was not secured solidly and has moved to the bottom of the hull. The boat will still float but will be harder to right, if not impossible.

    Next look at the following sketch and see what will happen if you, for some reason, you decide to relocate the flotation material:

    As you can see, this is not a good idea. The boat still floats but it will never right itself from this position.

    In the next article we'll study flotation even more.

    Don"
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    Default Re: Bolger Storm Petrel

    Don Elliott on Storm Petrel continued

    "Tue Feb 6, 2001 6:57am
    STORM PETREL'S FLOTATION NO 2.

    This article on Storm Petrel will study Mr. Bolger's choice of location for the flotation material aboard Storm Petrel. We will look at what effect its location will have on the boat. We will attempt to find the reason or reasons Mr. Bolger locates it where he has, and then we can determine how much of a value it will be to us.

    If you recall from an earlier article, Storm Petrel will float in the position as shown in the first sketch shown below. It will float at deck level because the flotation material is located high in the boat.

    It was pointed out earlier that with the flotation at deck level the boat would quickly right itself if capsized because of this location (see the second sketch, top view). Notice in the sketch showing the flotation at the bottom the boat will not right itself easily or worse not at all,

    Why are we then questioning the location at all? Well not all designers agree on the location of flotation. Some designers* believe that any ballast boat should have all its flotation at the bottom of the boat. Their reasoning is that if the boat is holed the boat will float high in the water as shown in the sketch below (lower view):

    The reason they want it to float high is in this position very little water will enter the boat, allowing you to repair or plug the hole and then press on.

    Mr. Bolger states that even with Storm Petrel holed and flooded you will still be able to sail even if it were completed flooded. So, who then is right? Well the answer to that is what do we want the boat to do? That involves more study. Here is a brief list of what we want:

    1. What we want is the flotation material not to encroach on our needed space.
    2. If capsized we want the boat to right itself and not be stuck upside down.
    3. If holed or flooded we want to be able to plug the hole and bail the boat.
    4. We want the boat to be able to sail or motor on in any condition.
    5. We want to correct the problem in the least amount of time or better yet not to have it occur at all.

    Is it possible to have all of these things? That will be the subject of our next article on Storm Petrel.

    *Ref. Dave Gerr's The Nature of Boats.
    Note:
    1. This study is for small ballast boats.
    2. This study does not apply to unballasted boats, which will be studied in a later article."
    Last edited by cluttonfred; 04-11-2021 at 04:39 PM.
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    Default Re: Bolger Storm Petrel

    Don Elliott on Storm Petrel continued

    "Fri Feb 9, 2001 8:39am
    STORM PETREL'S FLOTATION NO 3

    While cruising in small boats it has been found that a collision is more likely to happen than a capsize, that of course, is with good sailing on your part. Most collisions happen in congested areas and help will generally be close at hand. Other times collisions can occur in open water, in that case you must deal with the problem on your own. As Mr. Bolger points out the likelihood of these things occurring is very slim to none. Here, however we intent to look at any possible condition that might affect small boat safety, no matter how minor.

    Look at the following sketch; a repair patch is being applied to the hull. Notice that a tether line from the crew to the boat is being used (the larger line). Also notice the emergency bag slung around the sailors neck, the materials necessary for the repair came out of that in that bag (This emergency bag and its use will be show in more detail later). You can see the damage to the hull goes a long way towards the rear of the boat. For the Storm Petrel any damage would have to go back far enough back before it would really do any serious damage. The reason is that the main cabin is a totally separate and the bow is somewhat like a crash box that is in cars, it can be crushed and the cabin will still be intact. Notice also that the boat is floating high enough out of the water to allow the repair to be made; this is due to the flotation material being located at the deck level.

    What we can do to make Storm Petrel even better is beef up Storm Petrel bow's wet well a little to make it even tougher. First we'll increase the size of the stem, as designed it's 1-1/2" square stock, by the time it's shaped to take the hull sides you wouldn't have much left, so make it bigger. Next we'll add about a cubic foot of foam flotation in the form of flat insulation material. Any foam material that's use on a boat must be protected from the sun or it will breakdown quickly, so we add a thin material over the foam. (Thin aluminum would be good.) We then epoxy fillet the base of that to the hull. Also we have butted the keel mounting doubler up against the stem. Now the bow section is stronger and will absorb a shock or collision far better than the original design. There is another reason for adding flotation in the bow section, which will become clear in the following paragraph. You can see the changes that were made in the following sketch:

    If you recall in the last article there was concern that with flotation located at the deck level bailing could be a problem. We will cure this problem in two ways. The first is to add flotation material along the side of the cabin walls the same way as we did in the bow, except in this case no protective panel is required, as it is not exposed to the sun. The addition of the flotation material will now float the boat higher allowing easier bailing and repair, it will also provide thermal insulation. See the sketch below, notice the hull is still in balance:

    The second way to raise the boat higher is to add flotation at the bottom of the hull; we can do this by using an inflatable sleeping mattress and a truck inner tube in the cabin. The mattress would be secured to the bottom panel and the inner tube would go under the floor panel. The inner tube would be stored flat and only inflated if needed. The following sketch although it is from a totally different boat but will work equally as well on Storm Petrel:

    Now Storm Petrel is a much safer boat it will right itself easily and if damage it will float high in the water. Repairs can be easily made in any situation and the boat will be able to press.

    Don"

    That's the end of the flotation series, I will pull together more another day. I should point out that while I appreciated Don's comments (and I was very jealous of his artistic skills), I didn't necessarily agree with everything he said. Still, there was a lot of food for thought in his posts.

    Cheers,

    Matthew
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    Default Re: Bolger Storm Petrel

    Thank you Mr Long! This page is now the most comprehensive source of information on Storm Petrel, now that yahoo is gone. Many thanks, and I will enjoy seeing what else you have.

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    Default Re: Bolger Storm Petrel

    A friend of mine helped a teenager build a Storm Petrel in Juneau, Alaska:

    http://boats.backwater.org/StormPetrel/index.html

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    Default Re: Bolger Storm Petrel

    Was as your friend Fritz Funk? We corresponded a little back in the day. Is he still building boats?

    Quote Originally Posted by SethM View Post
    A friend of mine helped a teenager build a Storm Petrel in Juneau, Alaska:

    http://boats.backwater.org/StormPetrel/index.html
    *******
    Matthew Long
    Bolger fan (Brick, Yellow Leaf, June Bug, Tortoise and half a Teal)
    Dreaming of a small cruiser from Atkin, Bolger, Buehler or Parker
    www.cluttonfred.info (I also like homebuilt airplanes!)

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    Default Re: Bolger Storm Petrel

    Don Elliott on Storm Petrel continued

    "Wed Jan 31, 2001 9:33 am
    STORM PETREL STUDY NO 1

    This article will begin a study of the Storm Petrel as design by Philip Bolger. The Storm Petrel is an excellent boat and as Mr. Bolger points out it's the absolute minimum seaworthy boat. The articles will look at the ideas applied to this design and also see if there are ways to improve the design.

    As Storm Petrel was designed a long time ago some new building method and new design ideas have occurred since that time, so here we'll attempt simply to improve the design and but not change the basic design in any major way.

    In the following sketch we see the keel as designed:

    This is what Mr. Bolger says of the keel "Because of the rocker of the bottom offsets the bolt...brace it against side thrust...it strengthens rather than weakens the hull." If you look at the middle view you can see what he means by "it strengthens rather than weakens the hull," any force applied to the boat is resisted by the stiffness of the keel, make the hull actually stronger. An improvement that could be made to that keel is to add an end plate to the lower edge of the keel to prevent water from flowing from the high-pressure side to the low-pressure side while sailing. It would add some drag but the advantage of improving windward sailing might be worth the slight increase in drag.

    In the sketch below we'll look at what might happen if we happen to bend the keel. This may be of some concern to some people however we shall see bending the keel is really not going to endanger the craft at all.

    The view at the left shows the keel attachment to the hull, the drawing is to the exact size of the finished boat. Even with a great force, strong enough to bend the keel you can see that the most that can happen is the mounting tab will deform and nothing more. The reason for this is Mr. Bolger has mounted it with a large 5/8" bolt and backed it with a 7/8" backing block, preventing any movement of that bolt just by its size alone.

    In this next sketch we'll bring the attachment of the keel to the hull up to date with modern materials and also make that attachment far stronger than originally designed.

    To make certain that the attachment will never fail we've added an anti-splitting backing plywood the top of the backing block, this prevents the backing block from splitting. (It is important to select close-grain vertical fir for this block, and run it in the direction shown on the sketch.) We've added a heavy washer and mounted the nut with Lock-tight to prevent any loosening. This nut should be tightened real tight. When Storm Petrel was designed epoxy wasn't in wide use for boat building, we are using here to glue the pieces together. Between the hull and the keel we've added six layers of cloth to give the keel a hard spot to rest on. The hole for the 5/8" bolt must be tight against the bolt, no slop or oversize hole here, it should be tight in that hole.

    To be continued. Don"
    *******
    Matthew Long
    Bolger fan (Brick, Yellow Leaf, June Bug, Tortoise and half a Teal)
    Dreaming of a small cruiser from Atkin, Bolger, Buehler or Parker
    www.cluttonfred.info (I also like homebuilt airplanes!)

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    Default Re: Bolger Storm Petrel

    The curve of the hull takes the bending stress away from the individual bolts, so it is not as simple as that drawing. To illustrate, mentally compress the length of the boat so the keel to hull joint is a semi-circle. Then think about how side loads are resisted by the ends being much higher than the middle.
    I am, right now, fitting the keel to another Bolger design and it is quite apparent how this works.
    Last edited by Andrew2; 04-13-2021 at 01:15 AM.

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    Default Re: Bolger Storm Petrel

    Don Elliott on Storm Petrel continued

    "Thu Feb 1, 2001 7:41am
    STORM PETREL STUDY NO 2

    When I first looked at Storm Petrel's hatch I had a couple of reactions. First, it appears as if it was an after thought and just added on at the last moment, I also thought this thing could be blown away easily in the right conditions. Then I thought what would you do with it if you needed to have the hatch off, where would you put it? To store it seems to be a problem, it is to large to fit in the cockpit or the anchor well. What would you do with it? Did Mr. Bolger intend for you to secure it right away after opening it? If the wind was strong enough it could be blown out of your hands and fly overboard. To prevent that you could tie a strong line to it so you could retrieve it but its possible that it could be broken to pieces if smashed around by the strong winds.
    Here's my first thought of how to cure these problems. If you were in the cabin say, although it may be difficult, I believe you have plenty of room to dress without sitting headroom provided by the original hatch cover. So I converted it to a flush deck boat by making a simple low hatch, see the sketch below:



    The hatch is made secure by nylon hinges and when it's open you can tie it to the mast. The large arrow A indicated that the hatch has been moved forward about a foot forward to allow the crew to sit more in the center of the boat. The spray rail directs fast moving water over the top of the hatch. This hatch set-up would be best for extreme conditions; it allows you to move with greater safety around
    the deck without bumping into the standard hatch cover. If you wanted you could actually have both the tall hatch and the low hatch and use them at different times to suit your trip.

    My second solution was to build a permanent fixed non-removable structure with a hatch at the rear. See the sketch below to see that modification:



    That hatch would have a nylon hinge and when the hatch was closed it would be secured by a line to a cleat as shown. A compass has been added with an air vent for the cabin, the vent is designed into the compass mounting base. I neglected to show exterior grab handles to the structure, you could use these while moving around on the boat.

    To be continued. Don"
    *******
    Matthew Long
    Bolger fan (Brick, Yellow Leaf, June Bug, Tortoise and half a Teal)
    Dreaming of a small cruiser from Atkin, Bolger, Buehler or Parker
    www.cluttonfred.info (I also like homebuilt airplanes!)

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    Default Re: Bolger Storm Petrel

    Don Elliott on Storm Petrel continued

    "Wed Feb 7, 2001 6:49am
    STORM PETREL STUDY NO 3

    In the last article on Storm Petrel we saw that sometimes designers don't agree on where boat floatation should be located. In this article we'll compare those different locations and see what affect they have on the boat.

    We decided in the last article that the best way to evaluate the different locations is to see how these locations affect the boat. We then made a list of what we want the flotation to do for us. Here's the list from the last article on what we would like to have.

    1. What we want is the flotation material not to encroach on our needed space.
    2. If capsized we want the boat to right itself and not be stuck upside down.
    3. If holed or flooded we want to be able to plug the hole and bail the boat.
    4. We want the boat to be able to sail or motor on in any condition.
    5. We want to correct the problem in the least amount of time or better yet not to have it occur at all.

    Is it possible to have all of these things? That will be the subject of our next article on Storm Petrel.

    For item number 1: placing the flotation at the rear on the bottom is no problem but in the cabin area it would as there is very little space even to turn over in your sleep (about 24 inches (60 cm) of height in the cabin). If flotation is placed on the floor it would intrude on the cabin space, we don't want that.

    See the following sketch for item number 2. On that sketch you can see that if the boat capsized completely and didn't right itself on its own it would be much harder to turn the boat back upright if the flotation were located on the bottom. If it were at the deck level (view A) wave action alone would most likely right the boat, with no effort on your part. If it didn't right on it own, with the flotation at deck level it would be a snap to roll it upright.



    Item 3, this is a condition where for one reason or another the boat become flooded due to a hull puncture or simply water somehow entering the cabin. This is a more complex problem and will require a separate article in itself. We'll cover this later.

    Item 4 the ability to sail in any condition is no problem; both locations will allow us to do that; even if Storm Petrel was unlucky enough to be flooded completely.

    Item 5; correct the problem quickly or preventing it in the first place is closely tied to item number 3, so it will be discussed at the same time, that is, in the next article.

    The last question; can we have everything in the list without compromising anything else? In the final article on flotation you will see that with careful design we can. Don"
    *******
    Matthew Long
    Bolger fan (Brick, Yellow Leaf, June Bug, Tortoise and half a Teal)
    Dreaming of a small cruiser from Atkin, Bolger, Buehler or Parker
    www.cluttonfred.info (I also like homebuilt airplanes!)

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    Default Re: Bolger Storm Petrel

    I see now that my files had Don's posts slightly out of order but they are all still understandable and the dates at the beginning of each post can help sort them out. I hope this is useful stuff, I know it has me thinking. Cheers, Matthew
    Last edited by cluttonfred; 04-13-2021 at 07:59 PM.
    *******
    Matthew Long
    Bolger fan (Brick, Yellow Leaf, June Bug, Tortoise and half a Teal)
    Dreaming of a small cruiser from Atkin, Bolger, Buehler or Parker
    www.cluttonfred.info (I also like homebuilt airplanes!)

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    Default Re: Bolger Storm Petrel

    Quote Originally Posted by cluttonfred View Post
    Was as your friend Fritz Funk? We corresponded a little back in the day. Is he still building boats?
    Yes it was, but then we both moved away from Juneau and lost touch with each other...

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