Page 11 of 11 FirstFirst ... 1011
Results 351 to 375 of 375

Thread: Sooty Tern No. 93

  1. #351
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Blaxland, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    436

    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Quote Originally Posted by IanMilne View Post
    Hi Alex,
    If the cross-section of your stem/apron (inner stem) is slightly off square, don't forget it still has to be bevelled to take the planking, so any off-squareness in the outer part of it can be taken out at that stage, and the shape of the inner part (inside the planking) doesn't matter.
    Cheers,
    Ian
    Thank you Ian : ). I was hoping that it was something simple like that.
    Cheers,
    Alex.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 04-30-2021 at 10:32 PM.
    You can never have too many clamps

  2. #352
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Victoria, BC, Canada
    Posts
    1,500

    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    What Ian said.

    You'll do your best when bevelling for the plank lands, of course, but if they are off a little, thickened epoxy is your friend. You should be cutting the planks a little long in any case. That allows you to trim any excess back to a square outer face of the inner stem to match the outer stem, after the planks have all been glued on. Once the outer stem is glued on, you'll never notice any discrepancies.
    Alex

    “A man in an open shirt, sat gazing out to sea; A young man, a hale man, and I wished that I were he and that the things that I loved were as they used to be”
    - Geoffrey Holdsworth

    http://www.alexzimmerman.ca

  3. #353
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    847

    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    [QUOTE=IanMilne;6432822]I don't think you need to buy more 3mm MDF for this purpose, if I may say so. It would be too bendy. The top face of your levelled building frame would do just as well for checking the straightness of your laminated stems, even if it is not a continuous surface. They should be straight anyway, from the laminating bench. Just eyeball along the side of the stem, from one end.
    You get quite good at guessing the amount of glue to mix up, after a while. I use measuring glasses. I'll put a photo of them on here, but not right now.
    Cheers,
    Ian[/QUOTE, #336, p.10)]

    Here's the photo of my measuring glasses, FWIW, and my mixing knife. The knife just happens to have a curve on the blade that fits the curve of the larger glass, so it is good for scraping the glass out, and a straight back for scraping out the smaller glass. (It's funny how the handle gradually gets thicker!)On the back of the smaller glass are graduations in single millilitres, so with these glasses I can mix any quantity shown on the larger one, except 2.5 ml. I have used the pumps too and, like you, have found them slow on the return stroke, but I can put up with that for a while. If I am using them, I pump the first two or three doses into the measuring glasses to check the pumps' accuracy. I guess we all have our favourite ways of doing these things. I have never had any trouble with these methods. I have other knives good for filleting too.
    P1020098.jpg

    P1020100.jpg


    Cheers,
    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 04-24-2021 at 10:39 PM. Reason: I forgot the photos!
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  4. #354
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Location
    Rushworth, Australia
    Posts
    760

    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    That “metric measure” glass looks like a beer glass Ian , careful

  5. #355
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Blaxland, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    436

    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Quote Originally Posted by AJZimm View Post
    What Ian said.

    You'll do your best when bevelling for the plank lands, of course, but if they are off a little, thickened epoxy is your friend. You should be cutting the planks a little long in any case. That allows you to trim any excess back to a square outer face of the inner stem to match the outer stem, after the planks have all been glued on. Once the outer stem is glued on, you'll never notice any discrepancies.
    Thank you for your reassurance too, Alex. Planking of boats is something that I have never done before, so I'm not rushing it! In fact, I might actually say that I'm avoiding it! Happily, I have three sheets of 3 mm meranti ply to make templates with.


    [QUOTE=IanMilne;6436434]
    Quote Originally Posted by IanMilne View Post
    I don't think you need to buy more 3mm MDF for this purpose, if I may say so. It would be too bendy. The top face of your levelled building frame would do just as well for checking the straightness of your laminated stems, even if it is not a continuous surface. They should be straight anyway, from the laminating bench. Just eyeball along the side of the stem, from one end.
    You get quite good at guessing the amount of glue to mix up, after a while. I use measuring glasses. I'll put a photo of them on here, but not right now.
    Cheers,
    Ian[/QUOTE, #336, p.10)]

    Here's the photo of my measuring glasses, FWIW, and my mixing knife. The knife just happens to have a curve on the blade that fits the curve of the larger glass, so it is good for scraping the glass out, and a straight back for scraping out the smaller glass. (It's funny how the handle gradually gets thicker!)On the back of the smaller glass are graduations in single millilitres, so with these glasses I can mix any quantity shown on the larger one, except 2.5 ml. I have used the pumps too and, like you, have found them slow on the return stroke, but I can put up with that for a while. If I am using them, I pump the first two or three doses into the measuring glasses to check the pumps' accuracy. I guess we all have our favourite ways of doing these things. I have never had any trouble with these methods. I have other knives good for filleting too.
    P1020098.jpg

    P1020100.jpg


    Cheers,
    Ian
    Hello Ian, thanks for the pictures. I like your mixing knife! I use slightly shaped tongue depressors to mix resin and glue, which seem to serve me well (when I get too much resin on it I sand it back . ), but a proper knife might do better duty. I have - somewhere - a range of plywood filletting sticks that I used on the 'Duck, that boat needing in a couple of instances quite a wide fillet (where the bottom panel and side tank walls attached), plus others. I wonder what I've done with them. Thanks for the pictures of the measuring devices. The mixing cups as sold to me by Boatcraft Pacific (makers of Bote-Cote) have graduation marks on them, but I've never bothered to calibrate them. That's probably something that I should do one day soon. We do have a medicine-measuring cup somewhere, not to mention the graduated syringes that I use for the model planes. Work in progress.


    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Donald View Post
    That “metric measure” glass looks like a beer glass Ian , careful
    Snort!

    In other news, I've got some suitable lengths of meranti for shape-holding apron battens, and some a length of square pine for more laminating block - I'm going to leave most of the forward apron block in place, at least until after I've dome the stern apron, which is of pressing urgency.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    You can never have too many clamps

  6. #356
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    847

    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    No, it's not big enough for a beer glass, Andrew.

    Carry on, Alex! You're doing fine.

    Ian
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  7. #357
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Blaxland, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    436

    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Thanks, Ian.

    I did a bit of work on the bow apron this arvo:

    1. I took to it with the long Perma-Grit sander (coarse side). This had the advantages of being slow, and that I could see what I was doing far more clearly than holding the infernally buzzing planer.


    Overview of cleaned-up apron side by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.


    2. The sanding surfaces on the Perma-Grit blocks are attached to a very stiff aluminium extrusion, very useful for this sort of work. I checked the squareness of the surface to the inner face of the apron using the smallest of my engineer's squares, so now only the side that went across the jointer is out of kilter (a bit)


    Glue sanded off the starboard apron side using the coarse side of the long Perma-Grit block by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.


    3. Here's the apron a bit closer up


    Closer view of the Perma-Gritted side by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.


    4.Looking towards the keelson end


    Cleaned-up apron toward the keelson end by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.


    5. And speaking of the keelson end, I made a few pencil marks there to define the end of the apron where it butts up against the mast box (yawl version), and where the keelson attaches. Well, more or less, anyway


    Some provisional - and temporary - marks added by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.


    6. I added some neat resin to some gaps and cracks up the top end, around where I'm going to make the initial trim there, this evening, just to tack things together so that the cutting process doesn't disturb things still further. That 'max cutoff' note should be 'min' as that is quite a bit higher than the plans for the yawl's snout show. The region between the two (sets) of diagonal lines needs to be left for the apron to be attached to the building frame front bearer (see also the 'screw' note)


    Quick resin tack-up to hold the ends together by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.

    The marks shown in photo 5 above will be removed as I get the apron down to the right thickness - still around 10 mm to go, yet. I wanted to get a clearer idea of where I need to cut the apron, which will be trimmed before attempting to introduce it to the thicknesser - that could go horribly wrong, otherwise, and reduces the risk somewhat.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 04-26-2021 at 06:42 AM.
    You can never have too many clamps

  8. #358
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    847

    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    That stem/apron looks about perfect to me.
    If you draw a line to cut to, and then change it, always make sure you rub out or effectively delete the wrong one, or you could end up cutting to it anyway, especially if you've just been distracted.
    Cheers,
    Ian
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  9. #359
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Blaxland, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    436

    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Quote Originally Posted by IanMilne View Post
    That stem/apron looks about perfect to me.
    If you draw a line to cut to, and then change it, always make sure you rub out or effectively delete the wrong one, or you could end up cutting to it anyway, especially if you've just been distracted.
    Cheers,
    Ian
    Hello Ian,

    Thank you for your kind words - I’m pleased with that side . Great piece of advice re pencil marks - I get so easily distracted! The rubber in the case will hopefully be the spinning spiral thicknesser cutter.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    You can never have too many clamps

  10. #360
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Blaxland, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    436

    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Not a lot done today, but I did watch a coupple of Geoff Kerr's 'How to Build a Caledonia Yawl' video from his Off Center Harbor series. I dare say that most people of the WBF have seen them, but they are worth revisiting, and for newcomers, very valuable tutelage.

    1. I cut up these building blocks for me to play with on the tablesaw - more or less a copy of the sizes that I used with the bow apron/stem


    Some building blocks for me to play with by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.


    2. Having chopped off the AP line with the saw yesterday, I need to replace it somehow (I also remeasured all stations back from the FP location). The remnant of the 42 mm square pine length that I cut for blocks made for a useful AP marker...


    A rather Heath-Robinsonian way to replace a saw-deleted line by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.


    3. All that so that I could check the AP line on the port main bearer:


    AP mark set up on the other side by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.


    4. Having determined the location of the line, I sliced up the notch, cleaned up with a chisel, and filed to the lines using Perma-Grit files. Either there's a bit of dust on that chisel tip or there is a nick in it...


    Rough cut, ready for trimming down to the line(s) by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.


    5. Parallax suggests that it isn’t but the rear edge is in fact right on the 25” line (this is on the starboard side - the new notch was of course on the port side)


    Bang on the mark by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.


    6. Ready for attaching to the frame and marking up - it will get clamped in final positions (on both sides), checking for square from the reference (starboard) side. and screwed down


    Done, ready for attaching to the frame and marking up by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.

    I've worked out a way to remove the bow apron support beam without turning the bench over - a square driver bit in a hex adapter on a socket wrench

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    You can never have too many clamps

  11. #361
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Location
    Rushworth, Australia
    Posts
    760

    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Love the lighting in #360.1 - Those blocks grain look great, dunno if you meant to get that tree in the background, clever.

    And

    #360.4 Close-ups are one of my favourite forms of photography. Good onya.
    Last edited by Andrew Donald; 04-27-2021 at 05:34 AM.

  12. #362
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Blaxland, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    436

    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Donald View Post
    Love the lighting in #360.1 - Those blocks grain look great, dunno if you meant to get that tree in the background, clever.

    And

    #360.4 Close-ups are one of my favourite forms of photography. Good onya.
    Hello Andrew - that tree in 360.1 snap was purely by accident - I was trying to hide the car, which was sticking out like a sore thumb! I'm glad that you liked it. And the close-up I am very fond of that sort of photography myself, and like getting even closer with 'macro' setting (very easy on the specialised phone app that I take all my snaps with).

    I did a bit o' scrubbin' with the long Perma-grit block on the tilted side of the apron this morning and got it pretty square with the aft face, doing it in shortish sections and checking constantly with the smallest engineer's square. I'm a lot happier with that, and will post some photos tomorrow. I had a bit of a tedious afternoon so am having an early night.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    You can never have too many clamps

  13. #363
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Blaxland, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    436

    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    I was feeling a bit crook over the last few days, so work on the boat - and especially fighting the computer and the Forum software - have been throttled back a bit. So, time for a bit of catch-up:

    1. Port side apron after some more sanding


    ‘Straightened’ port side by Alexander_Newman, on Flickr.


    2. Small engineer's square sitting on the apron


    One of the better parts of the ‘fixed’ side by Alexander_Newman, on Flickr.


    3. Apron glue joints in cross-section - they don't look particualrly starved


    I got the tenon saw out: glue joints revealed in criss-section by Alexander_Newman, on Flickr.


    4. I finally plucked up my courage and shortened the apron with a view to feeding it to the thicknesser soon


    Both ends trimmed by Alexander_Newman, on Flickr.


    5. Hmm. This should not be - back on the floor again!


    Note the gap under the level by Alexander_Newman, on Flickr.


    6. The long haul back to the floor...


    Clearing the decks by Alexander_Newman, on Flickr.

    When I say 'long haul, I mean it. The process wasn't simple, despite how it might look at first glance. This will become apparent in further posts.
    You can never have too many clamps

  14. #364
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Blaxland, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    436

    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    1. These craters were dealt with using a chisel, and on the underlying 3 mm ply sheets, chisel and sandpaper...


    Laminating-block screw holes under the lower sheet by Alexander_Newman, on Flickr.


    2. First I had a jolly good sweep and cleaned up between the 3 mm ply sheets - there was a surprising amount of stuff 'twixt them all! The ply then got moved - and not for the first time


    More deck-clearing by Alexander_Newman, on Flickr.


    3. This is the first shot at getting the boards flat - it worked up to a point, but I wasn't happy with it


    Wedges used to get a level board along the stern apron’s path by Alexander_Newman, on Flickr.


    4. Oh NO! I misread the plans - Iain was right and I was wrong, humble pie eating time! I probably saw 'building frame' on the plans and thought, "Ah, top of building frame', without looking more closely at the plans - there are in fact two 'building frame' labels, one for the top and one for the bottom, but not distinguished. At pitfall trap for the alex...


    Oops! I misread the plans… by Alexander_Newman, on Flickr.


    5. Comparison to the relevant parts of the AT stems plan and ST lofting - not a lot of difference at the apron bearer, after all - but there is some. It was a lot easier to view things without the blocks being in the way, too (but the blocks weren't there when I made the error during the lofting process)


    Proper positioning of the apron bearer by Alexander_Newman, on Flickr.


    6. It's funny - given the common waterlines (and that was done to catch errors if nothing else...) - that I didn't pick up the discrepancy at the time. I drew in the more accurate building frame lines in brown pen; the building frame bottom line is 150 mm below the top since the LVLs used are nominally 150 mm deep - but of course, they moy not be, if it is actually 6" (152.4 mm). This will be checked before I can call the new apron slot measurements correct... I'm happier with the (top) stern number. The offending incorrect bottom edge and associated stuff have been rubbed out, too


    The aft portion of the top of the bearer was in the right place by Alexander_Newman, on Flickr.
    You can never have too many clamps

  15. #365
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Blaxland, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    436

    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    1. Just to check that I wasn't deluding myself with my accuracy in re-drawing the fore and aft BF top lines, I ran the spirit level and 1000 mm steel rule along to so see if they met up tolerably closely - which, thank goodness, they did! Note the boards to the right - they will appear in earnest shortly

    1.
    Fore and aft bearer tops line up… by Alexander_Newman, on Flickr.


    After a bit of fussing about on the floor with weights then wedges, I decided to cut to the chase and make up a flat frame in situ. Given that the BF is a long way away and I would have to find some way of getting the laminating board up their, I decided that it would be quicker and more convenient all round to get in some LVL I-beams and make something up from that - watching out for the various lumps and bumps onm the floor (the centre expansion joint actually creates a hump so had to be avoided).

    This is where even more fun started, as it appears that there is a significant Australia-wide shortage of LVLs and LVL !-beams, after some internet catalogue searching followed by phone calls. I thought that I had hit the jackpot at one point, but after an hour's drive, I found that there had been either a miscommunication on my part or a misunderstanding on the other, but the long and the short of it was that of wooden I-beams there were none.

    As I was driving home rather disconsolately, it occurred to me that the Manning bench anvil parts could be usefully - if temporarily - repurposed, and since the workshop with the bits in it was on the way home, and I had the right car, I popped in. While the anvil bits are only 2.0 metres long instead of 2.4 m, I decided that they would do. 200 mm overhang at each side isn't very significant if, as I intend, that the board(s) are screwed down onto the supports. So I bunged 'em in the car and brought them home.

    2. I moved the boards about to find which part of which floor and which boards which part of the floor supported the spirit level at three points (there were two LVL lengths of widths differing by around 5 mm) I arrived at this:


    Setting up a flat frame for the laminating board, part 1 by Alexander_Newman, on Flickr.


    3. Earlier thought suggested that three (or the hoped-for four) boards would need binding together to stabilise the structure, so I decided to attach some lengths of 9 x 35 mm pine offcuts to the ends of the boards, on opposing (vertical) diagonals (so that the boards don't hinge under pressure like a set of louvres). The raw bits can be seen here


    Setting up a flat frame for the laminating board, part 2 by Alexander_Newman, on Flickr.


    4. I fiddled about to maximise the angle at which the boards were set


    First end-plate installed by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.


    5. First end plate showing cut off clearance regions for floor and board


    End plate with clearance cut off for floor and laminating board(s) by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.


    6. This is quite solid now, and adding the boards on top will help


    Other end on - basic frame more-or-less complete by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.


    I could beef it up slightly by filling in the 'diagonal' gaps at the top of the frame with trimmed offcuts, but I'll think about it. Of course, I may put the boards on top and find that it's no different from being on the floor - in which case I gettthe Manning bench bits back for their original use more quickly than I am currently anticipating. This rather puts salt on my tail to get the apron and stem done and out of the way!

    By the way, the roll of plastic sheet appearing in many photos will eventually be used to cover the laminating board again - completely, this time.
    You can never have too many clamps

  16. #366
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Blaxland, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    436

    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Rightio, last constructional sort of post for today:

    1. I got energetic and added the top 'filler bits:


    Filler pieces added by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.


    2. Gravity is helping keep the first plywood board down


    First (upside down half-moulds) board added by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.


    3. This one isn't flat at all - as expected. It's as dished as a...well, a dish. A squillion 30 mm screws will fix that, I hope - otherwise there will be A Great Squawking and Clucking(TM). Note that I have trimmed the 'ears' (trip, bruising and cut hazards) off by this stage (before I tripped, got bruised, or cut)


    Stems board on - not at all flat, as expected by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.


    4. The flatness or otherwise of the apron can’t be checked properly until the board is nailed down firmly onto the frame and is itself nice and flat, if that's at all possible - which I am now starting to doubt...


    With apron and outer stem by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.


    The new frame appears to be flat, and is very solid (it passes the kick test well). If the laminating board won't cooperate, I might consider some aggressive surgery on its undersurface with the belt sander and 60-grit belt at judicious spots. I can already hear the suggestion that I get a thick-ish MDF board, but that would mean re-lofting the stems. Still, I've only done the stems once; the half-moulds got done three times in the end...

    That's enough for today; I'll attack the board(s) with the packet of screws and driver tomorrow - after I've located the centrelines of the underlying frames parts.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    You can never have too many clamps

  17. #367
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    847

    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Your stem/apron looks fine to me, Alex.

    Ian
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  18. #368
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Blaxland, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    436

    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Quote Originally Posted by IanMilne View Post
    Your stem/apron looks fine to me, Alex.

    Ian
    Thanks, Ian - it oes look straight to the eye when looking down it.

    1. I spotted this lurking up on the shelves when I was looking for my favourite 2 metre straight-edge. This, at 2.6 m, is even better! I'd forgotten that I had it. I used the newly-rediscovered item to drawn in the centrelines of the underlying beams onto the board


    A long straight-edge by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.


    2. The board gets screwed down onto all three beams plus the top ends of the end-pieces


    Screws laid our along the support mid-lines by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.


    3. All screws in place and the plastic cover sheet cut to length


    Plastic sheet cut to size and ready to nail down by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.


    4. Plastic sheet secured- still a bit of a ridge on the roll-fold


    Plastic stretched and stapled down by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.


    5. The two aft blocks for the bow apron weren't put back - a third was removed to clear the aft-most stern apron block



    Bow apron blocks back in place by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.


    6. I plopped the blocks down and checked for squarenes, turning the odd block around where necessary. They are yet to be pre-drilled and clad in plastic packaging tape (all around the sides this time)


    Stern apron blocks placed in position by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.

    So, did the effort in creating a flat surface succeed? Only partially. The left hand side of the board is fine, but the right-most quarter is still a bit cupped. Since it is better than it was, I'm not going to worry about it further, especially as the side of the board that is going to be in use next is flat. What might be causing the cupping of the board I have no idea at present. I got all the screw craters and so forth off the faces of the two boards when I was doing the Big Cleanup, using chisel, sandpaper and broom, so that isn't the source. Maybe the board is in fact thicker at that spot (the 'north-east' corner - literally as well as figuratively), than the rest of it. Who knows?

    The positioning of the blocks needed more time, care and energy than I had available so I've left that until tomorrow or some such suitable occasion.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 05-03-2021 at 05:38 AM.
    You can never have too many clamps

  19. #369
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    847

    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    "It does look straight to the eye when looking down it."

    If it looks good, it is good.

    (Nice laminating board, BTW.)

    Cheers,
    Ian


    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  20. #370
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Blaxland, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    436

    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Well, after a bit of poor health, I've been back at it. A bit. I keep encountering problems in setting up to do the stern stem parts that I should have foreseen - having foreseen them and avoided them, largely, when I did the bow apron. This has been very annoying and frustrating, but first, stuff from when things seemed to be going smoothly (like a shark just under the surface)...

    1. Six new wedges from the laminating board support production, and very useful they will no doubt be, too


    Six new wedges from setting up the laminating board support by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.


    2. All fourteen blocks taped, with the tape all around the blocks and stuck back onto itsef


    Stern apron laminating blocks covered with brown packaging tape - all around by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.


    3. Three taped blocks, sitting on the oh-so-slippery plastic sheet


    Three tape-encircled blocks by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.



    4. And a close-up, because I like close-ups. Note the rounded edges, to allow the tape to stick better to the bocks, although it reduces the effective width of said blocks by up to 5 mm


    Close-up of encased block by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.


    5. Block re-location marls made using a couple of sharp twists of the screwdriver for each ding


    Block-location marks added using careful alignment and a screwdriver by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.


    6. The Boss kindly gave me a cake tin for (eventually) moulding lead ballast pigs in


    ‘Mould’ for ballast pigs by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.

    TBC...
    Last edited by Alex1N; 05-08-2021 at 03:33 AM.
    You can never have too many clamps

  21. #371
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Blaxland, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    436

    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    This - as has already been foreshadowed at least twice - is where things started to go seriously pear-shaped (I like pears, so I use that saying with a certain amount of reluctance). When I set up the bow apron blocks, I was very careful to position the blocks and get them set up in place before adding the plastic sheet. This meant that it was a simple matter of undoing the blocks, putting down the sheet and putting the blocks back - after cutting out some relief-circles so that I could get rid of the screw craters:

    1. Discs cut out using a 9 or 10 mm (3/8"?) hole punch (last used by me on my 'Duck sail)


    Punching clearance holes for block fasteners by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.


    2. I only belatedly started cutting the discs on the version, and after a ding-dong fight with the blocks not sitting square to the board on account of the very slippery plastic sheet, with or without the relief holes cut, I replaced the screws with these whacking great big nails


    Screws replaced by nails by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.


    3. Halfway there, sort-of. The blocks are all over the place. At around this point I changed to thinner nails with sharper points in an attempt to improve location accuracy (didn't make much difference). I also moved some blocks sideways to escape the crook holes (didn't make a lot of difference there, either)


    Halfway there - sort-of… by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.


    4. Plus = add a shim...


    Marks showing where to remove tape and add taped shims by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.


    5. Hatched = sand it back


    Or in this case sanding stuff off, or replacing the entire block by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.


    6. On the other hand, by the time that I wrestled the staves into position and got 'em test-clamped, the matter of the out-of-position-by-half-a-millimetre-or-less-either-way problem seemed to average itself out and go away. The dead-blow hammer was needed to persuade the staves to sit flat


    Full set of staves test-fitted by Alexander Newman, on Flickr.


    So, it just goes to show. I'll revisit this later and see what I think. Any deviations from the lofted line can be sanded back - there is nothing that is behind the line at present. Adding the glue eventually will change things, of course, but on the plus side. One alternative is to rip it all to bits, redo the blocks in new positions without the plastic sheet, re-install sheet then blocks, etc. - but I am thoroughly disinclined to do that. Yet.

    I am going to tune the staves on the tablesaw, however, so that they are all the same width, before breaking out the glue. Some of the problems that I had with bow stem were caused by different widths on the same stave, in turn caused by the eccentrically incompetent way in which I 'milled' the oregon stock, and the same problem persists here at the moment.

    And speaking of the staves, I am inclined to replace some (probably about six) of these far-too-thin ones with some 5 mm-ish ones. And I will take much more care setting the bandsaw up this time, and use the pre-setting device (of which more in due course) when I get around to cutting them.

    Oh, and I checked the depth of the building frame main bearers - they're 6" (153 mm), not 150 mm, so some minor tweaking on the apron cutout required.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    You can never have too many clamps

  22. #372
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Blaxland, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    436

    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Quote Originally Posted by IanMilne View Post
    Your stem/apron looks fine to me, Alex.

    Ian
    Thank you kindly, Ian. I seem to be having much more of a struggle with the stern apron, but hopefully I'm over the hump and coasting down the other side.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    You can never have too many clamps

  23. #373
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    847

    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Hi Alex,
    Glad you're over the hump.
    If a block here and there is slightly short of the lofted line, just ignore it. The laminations will fair themselves past it. Just don't put a clamp on that block.
    No need to rip it apart.
    Cheers,
    Ian
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  24. #374
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Schleswig Holstein Germany
    Posts
    885

    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Hey Alex
    I know this problem.
    To keep these blocks from sliding at precise work pieces I secure them sometimes with doublesided tape or glue the blocks first with a hot glue fillet to the surface.
    Keep on laminatin´
    Max

  25. #375
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Blaxland, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    436

    Default Re: Sooty Tern No. 93

    Quote Originally Posted by IanMilne View Post
    Hi Alex,
    Glad you're over the hump.
    If a block here and there is slightly short of the lofted line, just ignore it. The laminations will fair themselves past it. Just don't put a clamp on that block.
    No need to rip it apart.
    Cheers,
    Ian
    Thanks Ian, I'm leaving it severely alone!

    Quote Originally Posted by Max F View Post
    Hey Alex
    I know this problem.
    To keep these blocks from sliding at precise work pieces I secure them sometimes with doublesided tape or glue the blocks first with a hot glue fillet to the surface.
    Keep on laminatin´
    Max
    Thanks Max, I'll store those tips for later use...

    Speaking of leaving things severely alone, I have stopped doing any direct work on the boat until I've got some maintenance issues sorted out, these including but not restricted to: the tablesaw, the bandsaw, the jointer, and an almost lethal state of untidiness in my shed at home. Plus I have been very busy with orchestral stuff, and am having eyesight/glasses problems. I went the see the optometrist yesterday so I'm hoping that the latter will be sorted out a bit.

    I am going through the shed like a dose of salts at the moment - when I get time - but it will take time sorting and shifting stuff from one place to another with the odd trip to the lockup or the workshop, then repeat. It has to be done before I end up tripping over, poisoning, or otherwise inadvertently doing myself in. I have had a couple of close shaves recently that have served as very clear warnings.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    You can never have too many clamps

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •