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Thread: A New Rig for Julia, Parcelled and Served Dyneema

  1. #211
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    Default Re: A New Rig for Julia, Parcelled and Served Dyneema

    The whisker pole is hollow birdsmouth construction, and surprisingly light. It comes in around 20 lbs with the end fittings. I made a little video about the process of building the spar.


  2. #212
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    Default Re: A New Rig for Julia, Parcelled and Served Dyneema

    Great vid Jonathon, thanks. Can you tell me how your varnished cabin rub rails work on external corners , it looks like a piece has been set at 45 across corner to help hide end grain?

  3. #213
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    Default Re: A New Rig for Julia, Parcelled and Served Dyneema

    Shoulda used Slots to fasten it to the mast. Clocked a la Jim Ledger.
    If one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours.
    -Henry David Thoreau-

  4. #214
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    Default Re: A New Rig for Julia, Parcelled and Served Dyneema

    Hi J,

    Any thoughts on how big of a spar you would do this with ? I'm thinking we should have tried this for our gaffs.

    Cheers,
    Mark

  5. #215
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    Default Re: A New Rig for Julia, Parcelled and Served Dyneema

    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Donald View Post
    Great vid Jonathon, thanks. Can you tell me how your varnished cabin rub rails work on external corners , it looks like a piece has been set at 45 across corner to help hide end grain?
    Actually I think it is just two pieces, one runs past the other.



    Quote Originally Posted by Mark0 View Post
    Hi J,

    Any thoughts on how big of a spar you would do this with ? I'm thinking we should have tried this for our gaffs.

    Cheers,
    Mark
    I would be happy with it for very big spars. Certainly gaffs, and even masts on boats to maybe 60 ft. Above that it would still work, but the glue-up would be easier just laminated up as a hollow stack of flat boards on the really big poles. I think the clamping arrangement and mechanics of the glue-up are the only real limitations. For big spars I would add one strake at a time using a clamping jig and letting it cure before adding the next.

  6. #216
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    Default Re: A New Rig for Julia, Parcelled and Served Dyneema

    Julia's possibly the prettiest boat we get to see in detail pretty regularly lately. Keep posting. She's beautiful. And your work isn't half bad either.
    If one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours.
    -Henry David Thoreau-

  7. #217
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    Default Re: A New Rig for Julia, Parcelled and Served Dyneema

    Quote Originally Posted by Sailor View Post
    Julia's possibly the prettiest boat we get to see in detail pretty regularly lately. Keep posting. She's beautiful. And your work isn't half bad either.
    Very kind!

  8. #218
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    Default Re: A New Rig for Julia, Parcelled and Served Dyneema

    Quote Originally Posted by J.Toiviainen View Post
    When at marina or anchor, on a windy day -or night - the dynema starts making a humming sound, which will be heard inside the boat loud and clear even so that it disturbs sleeping. The wire stay did not do that. Luckily we have found an easy solution. We tighten the running backstays a bit, the spring stay is not so tight anymore and the noise is away.
    Wonder would that same humming sound appear and stronger, if we changed all stays and shrouds to dynema?
    My loaded dyneema topping lift also hums in harbor with a decent breeze. I found that just wrapping a section of it with a short loop of extra dock line is enough to dampen the vibration and stop the noise.

  9. #219
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    Default Re: A New Rig for Julia, Parcelled and Served Dyneema

    Thanks for posting the video. I am just now milling staves for a birdsmouth mast, it was very helpful to see the process.

  10. #220
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    Default Re: A New Rig for Julia, Parcelled and Served Dyneema

    Nice video. Did you cast those fittings?
    (answered in #210, I see. Never mind)

    Beautiful work.
    Last edited by DoctorB; 07-15-2020 at 08:37 PM.

  11. #221
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    Default Re: A New Rig for Julia, Parcelled and Served Dyneema

    Quote Originally Posted by J.Madison View Post
    I have a Sailrite machine. Arabella will catch up in no time, I am jealous of having the boat right at hand with a workshop full of tools. I spend a lot of time carting tools and materials back and forth, and the boat is far enough that if I forgot some supplies or need to use the stationary power tools I have to wait another week to get back to it. I try to have multiple projects going at once, so one forgotten screw size doesn't render the trip useless.
    I have the same problem. What tools to have on the boat without being home with no tools for other things. I just get accustomed to making a list of tools needed for the next day project.
    The other problem is how to store tools and carry them. I have not found any plastic or cloth bag yet that I like.
    I do have a Sailrite also and probably will make more of my own bags. Right now I make a specific bag for large tools like pipe wrenches or things that rust.

  12. #222
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    Default Re: A New Rig for Julia, Parcelled and Served Dyneema

    Quote Originally Posted by J.Madison View Post
    The other thing I've been working on is a new tender.

    This is a Dave Gentry Annabelle skiff. I shortened it to 9'5" to fit on my cabin top, apologies to the designer! This required a bit of fine tuning to keep the sheer line fair.
    J., That's a really beautiful boat and I'm looking to build one as well. I see you extended the floorboards all the way to the stern of the boat and I'd like to do the same. You wouldn't happen to have a picture of how you did that, would you? Don't trouble yourself too much to provide one, but it would be interesting to see for reference what you did there.

    Thanks,
    Larry

  13. #223
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    Default Re: A New Rig for Julia, Parcelled and Served Dyneema

    You can't really see, but there is a 1x1 fastened to the transom each side to catch the ends of the floorboards. You can see the extra removable seat and oarlocks I added, but I plan to make some changes. Having another seat in the stern is a must to balance the boat with 2 people aboard, but the second rowing station shouldn't be the aft position, it should be at the bow seat. Trying to row with your feet under you instead of outstretched is not comfortable. So the aft person will just be along for the ride. Single-handed it works perfect on the main center thwart.



  14. #224
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    Default Re: A New Rig for Julia, Parcelled and Served Dyneema

    Thanks, like the idea of just having some extra floorboards to step back there if nothing else. I recall Dave saying that he didn't put floors there because sitting there would upset the weight balance under sail. I think some stuff resting against the skin would probably not be an issue, but I still feel like it would be better to have an extra layer there. Plus a bit of water seems to inevitably end up inside the boat.

    Also, I really like your color choice! It's unique and very handsome.

  15. #225
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    Default Re: A New Rig for Julia, Parcelled and Served Dyneema

    It's been a long time since we've had an update. 2020 was a bust, as it was for so many people. I spent the whole season away from the boat tending to some of the bad parts of life.

    But we're back at it now, the surface finishes are sad about being neglected for a year, but the boat is dry and sound and we have begun to resume progress.

    One of the last projects before we left was adding a track to the bowsprit to contain the foot of the jib. Previously the lower end of the dyarchy stay was just controlled with an outhaul, essentially set flying. I made the track from a bar of 954 bronze, machined on the table saw with a metal cutting blade. That is a scary job for sure, but it worked.

    I cast the track car as well, and I wanted a nice thick portion under the track for strength, so I glued a hardwood batten to the bowsprit to provide additional clearance.



    Lots going on in this shot. We have the topmast stay, and the jib stay turnbuckles. The low friction ring is for the outhaul, pulling the track car which has another low friction ring for the dyarchy stay. Countering the outhaul is the downhaul, one end of which fastens to the head of the sail. The block at the very bottom is sometimes used for the anchor snubber.




    I sewed a bag to protect the jib and save having to unrig it after every sail.



    We've been trying to tackle some of the little jobs as well. These brass strips were added to give half a chance of survival on the steep stairs when they are wet and pitching.





    The batteries ran out of water during my long absence, and the charger then packed it in after trying to charge the dead lumps for weeks on end. A bummer, but I had been debating if new batteries would be justified as I really wanted more capacity. That settled for me, I got a bigger charger and expanded the bank to 4 deep cycle golf cart batteries, and all new much heavier cables.


  16. #226
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    Default Re: A New Rig for Julia, Parcelled and Served Dyneema

    The boat is in remarkable shape overall, especially considering she is over 60 years old and still largely on the original steel fastenings. But there are a few areas that give me some worry when I picture a dark and stormy night far from land. I'll be taking care of each of these areas in turn.

    The first is the connections between the frame heels and the floor timbers. I believe there was originally concrete in the bilges as designed, or perhaps it sat for a long time with water high in the bilges, either way the frame heels aren't great. The fasteners are the worst of anywhere in the boat, the frames are beautiful and sound except for the last eight inches, but the bottoms have checks and are jet black. They ring solid to a hammer, but I think electrolysis has done some work on them.

    The floors themselves are fir and in good shape. No checking and solid throughout. So the dilemma is to transfer the loads from the floors up the frames. After much frightening thought about scarfing in new frame heels I decided to leave the frames alone and put in some heavy laminated floors right across the ditch and far up each side.



    The worst part was removing the beautiful teak and holly sole, as it was not built such that it could be removed. So I spent a day upside down under the sole cutting the fasteners with an oscillating tool until the sole could be removed.

    The new floors grab 5 planks each side and are heavily fastened into the keel. They are laminated yellow cedar, a bit bigger than the frames in each dimension. Planks will be fastened into them from the outside when I haul out. I didn't get pictures during the glue up, too sticky and messy and profane.





    Forward there was a nice sister frame in good shape that the previous owner installed. So I just added a normal floor timber to that frame.



    I finished off my time in the bilge by adding new fasteners to the existing frame/floor connections. It proved too destructive to remove the old ones in their deteriorated state, but luckily there is lots of space to add new ones.

    A new backup bilge pump was installed as the old one apparently choked on a rag and died. Everything was soaked in a glycol/borate solution, which is the damp sheen you see in the pictures.

    I now feel pretty confident that if something goes terribly wrong, it won't be because the keel fell off.



  17. #227
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    Default Re: A New Rig for Julia, Parcelled and Served Dyneema

    You have been busy and productive.

    Two things jump out at me:

    How many F-clamps did you consign to the briny as you glued that wood strip atop the bowsprit? If it had been me, I'm sure I would have lost one or two.

    Fitting in those new laminated floors really does look like a tough job. Not sure how you managed to slide all the bits in there. How are they fastened to the planks? From the outside? If so I assume the boat was out of the water at the time.

    Must feel good to get these jobs completed.
    Alex

    A man in an open shirt, sat gazing out to sea; A young man, a hale man, and I wished that I were he and that the things that I loved were as they used to be
    - Geoffrey Holdsworth

    http://www.alexzimmerman.ca

  18. #228
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    Default Re: A New Rig for Julia, Parcelled and Served Dyneema

    Quote Originally Posted by J.Madison View Post
    One of the last projects before we left was adding a track to the bowsprit to contain the foot of the jib. Previously the lower end of the dyarchy stay was just controlled with an outhaul, essentially set flying. I made the track from a bar of 954 bronze, machined on the table saw with a metal cutting blade. That is a scary job for sure, but it worked.

    I cast the track car as well...
    Slick! Looks like great engineering. Are there commercial alternatives for this kind of hardware at this scale? Meaning, could you have bought something that would do this job? I ask as someone who rarely buys off the shelf if given the option to make my own version at greater cost and time, and who appreciates the work you're doing for its own sake. I'm just curious and ignorant.


    -James

  19. #229
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    Default Re: A New Rig for Julia, Parcelled and Served Dyneema

    "So I spent a day upside down under the sole cutting the fasteners with an oscillating tool until the sole could be removed."

    That sort of operation is commendable. It's why "Happy Hour" was invented.

    -Jeff

  20. #230

    Default Re: A New Rig for Julia, Parcelled and Served Dyneema

    what a beautiful boat

  21. #231
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    Default Re: A New Rig for Julia, Parcelled and Served Dyneema

    Quote Originally Posted by AJZimm View Post
    You have been busy and productive.

    Two things jump out at me:

    How many F-clamps did you consign to the briny as you glued that wood strip atop the bowsprit? If it had been me, I'm sure I would have lost one or two.

    Fitting in those new laminated floors really does look like a tough job. Not sure how you managed to slide all the bits in there. How are they fastened to the planks? From the outside? If so I assume the boat was out of the water at the time.

    Must feel good to get these jobs completed.
    I actually managed not to lose any clamps overboard, but I did really focus on it!

    The new floors will be fastened to the planking from the outside when we haul out in a couple weeks.

    Quote Originally Posted by pez_leon View Post
    Slick! Looks like great engineering. Are there commercial alternatives for this kind of hardware at this scale? Meaning, could you have bought something that would do this job? I ask as someone who rarely buys off the shelf if given the option to make my own version at greater cost and time, and who appreciates the work you're doing for its own sake. I'm just curious and ignorant.


    -James
    Track and cars are readily available, but the 8 ft of bronze track I needed was going to cost nearly $1000 so I saved a lot by making my own.

  22. #232
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    Default Re: A New Rig for Julia, Parcelled and Served Dyneema

    Another small job was carving the documentation numbers into the bilge stringer in the engine bay. I don't think anybody is going to ask me to carve their transom anytime soon, but it makes us legal.



    The forward hatch lid was damaged and leaking, so I built a new one.



    The lovely butterfly hatch also leaked profusely, so it lived full time under a canvas cover. It also seemed a bit weak, so I scrapped it in favor of a lower profile design that will be much less likely to leak. The deadlight is 1/2" tempered glass and should support over 1000 lbs.



    The next upgrade to the jib handling system was a net under the bowsprit. This should allow me to just haul in the downhaul and the sail will be mostly contained until I can get some gaskets on it. Not a lot out there on making these things, but I seized a central line to the bobstay and spliced eyes in the ends of the other lines for lashings.




  23. #233
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    Default Re: A New Rig for Julia, Parcelled and Served Dyneema

    She's beautiful. Not accustomed to seeing a bilge as dry as Julia's. Methinks I need to get recaulking.

  24. #234
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    Default Re: A New Rig for Julia, Parcelled and Served Dyneema

    Pure boat porn......

    Gorgeous boat

  25. #235
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    Default Re: A New Rig for Julia, Parcelled and Served Dyneema

    Thanks guys. I'm blessed with dry bilges, except for that last little bit that I can't pump out. It wasn't always that way, I had to do some strategic caulking on the tidal grid.

    The next item on the list of structural improvements was the aft chainplates. I keep doing the math to see if they are strong enough, and the bottom line is I do not know what alloy (steel) the old chainplates are. If they are generic mild steel they really aren't strong enough to keep me comfortable. They appear forged, so are probably stronger than I'm giving them credit for, but I want to have peace of mind. The rig has no backstay, and the aft most shrouds are barely behind the mast at all. I have running backstays, but live in fear of an accidental gybe bringing the whole thing down.

    So I decided to add new chainplates, further aft and of a much stronger cross section.



    Inside I laminated a new partial frame. I had to disassemble some of the interior and ceiling planking to get access.



    These aft shrouds tie in to the mast at the fractionally rigged jibstay, and I feel they are more important than the main cap shrouds that run over the spreaders. That wouldn't be the case on a masthead rigged boat. The new chainplates are about 16" aft of the old ones, and maybe 30" aft of the mast. I should be able to get some tension on the jib halyard now for the first time, and be less reliant on the running backstays.



    The good thing about having the aft shrouds only go 2/3rd up the mast, is that they are still a good angle for side loads as well, and I'm confident they will keep the mast up as long as the stick can be kept from buckling.


  26. #236
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    Default Re: A New Rig for Julia, Parcelled and Served Dyneema

    Beautiful.
    Is that a ply subdeck i see in the roof in the cabin?
    Ply under teak gives me hives. If it is, keep that teak in good condition, oil it regularly, not just a wash down with salty water. You're in a battle against the inevitable.
    Such a beautiful boat - nice work.
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  27. #237
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    Default Re: A New Rig for Julia, Parcelled and Served Dyneema

    So, after your concern about the original chainplates possibly being mild steel, what material did you use for the hew one?
    Alex

    A man in an open shirt, sat gazing out to sea; A young man, a hale man, and I wished that I were he and that the things that I loved were as they used to be
    - Geoffrey Holdsworth

    http://www.alexzimmerman.ca

  28. #238
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    Default Re: A New Rig for Julia, Parcelled and Served Dyneema

    Quote Originally Posted by gypsie View Post
    Beautiful.
    Is that a ply subdeck i see in the roof in the cabin?
    Ply under teak gives me hives. If it is, keep that teak in good condition, oil it regularly, not just a wash down with salty water. You're in a battle against the inevitable.
    Such a beautiful boat - nice work.
    Yeah, not how I would choose to build a deck.

    Quote Originally Posted by AJZimm View Post
    So, after your concern about the original chainplates possibly being mild steel, what material did you use for the hew one?
    954 Bronze, 1/2" x 2"

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