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Thread: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

  1. #1086
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    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    It worked really well.

    IMG_0702.jpg

    IMG_0703.jpg

    IMG_0706.jpg

    Unfortunately I had somehow miscalculated the width I need and the length of the planks I bought. Also, I realized, that using the plumb-line wasn't a good idea as both sides on top are a bit different. Even so, I remembered that I needed to do some adjustments to the fashion-piece on the top of the port-side.

    I would have been unpractical to use the offcuts, as I wouldn't reach the desired height. So I went off to the wood-merchant again to get me another plank. This time a bit wider so it can go even over the top, giving me room for adjustments as much as I like. Especially as I first have to sort out the aft-corner of the fashion-piece on the portside.

    I know it's still super-slow progress, but it feels soooooo good to see something going on and looking a bit like things are coming together!
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
    www.tongabonds.com

  2. #1087
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    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    All the progress is getting the job done and having a wider board means its getting done properly.It also means that you won't see a mistake each time you look at the transom.I know too well that a small mistake draws your attention every time you look at the area,even if nobody else is aware of it.I hope your region was spared the worst of the weather that hit the Bay of Biscay in the last day or two.

  3. #1088
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    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    Thank you John! And it's true, it feels sooo much better!

    We were lucky so far and got spared most of the ugly weather. Even since then. There were some days with heavy winds and quite some rain, so I gave in and did some major patch-ups on the enclosure to stay nicely snug and protected. And I also figured out something to keep the strong gusts from coming in between the gap of the tent and the enclosure, also helps a lot in keeping off the rain (still dripping in but far far less than before). Just threaded some of the plastic I bought for trying out steam-bending some while ago between the lacing


    IMG_0794.jpg

    And we had some awesome waves sent down by a gale in the North-Atlantic. We usually don't have them at this time of the year and people were coming from all over the place, Brazil, United States, Canada, lots of places in Europe ... I have never seen so many people at the North-Beach and in view of the virus it was quite frightening as some simply got rid of their masks the moment the police wasn't watching, even worse when some of them started coughing and sneezing. The townhall had requested help from the fire-brigades, GNR (Guarda Nacional de Republica) and PSP (Policia Seguranca Publica) of Lisbon and Porto but by the time they arrived the situation was completely out of control and people were everywhere. To prevent a similar situation happening again, big-wave-surfing is forbidden on the North-Beach for the time being to prevent the crowds coming back together.


    IMG_0730.jpg

    IMG_0761.jpg

    My camera is not the best. But, just in case one or the other would love to see some really powerful shots, a friend of mine has started a website with the photos he keeps taking and I find them absolutely breathtaking. Here is the link: http://www.vitomarques.com/

    Meanwhile on Tonga ... I struggled on whenever the weather permitted.

    cont ..
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Dody; 11-15-2020 at 11:19 AM.
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
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  4. #1089
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    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    I got all the planks cut to length (wider than needed to be cut to shape the moment they are properly installed)


    IMG_0709.jpg

    Some more sanding needed to be done on the lower part of the fashion-piece

    IMG_0713.jpg

    Painted on the meeting edges and the inside - also the white (no photo) coz it's so much easier to do it on the bench instead of crawling into corners

    IMG_0717.jpg

    Both little cats got sterilized and didn't like to wear their protective coats

    IMG_0721.jpg

    Janis moved the babies to her patron, instead of 5 there are now only 2

    IMG_0776.jpg
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
    www.tongabonds.com

  5. #1090
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    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    IMG_0778.jpg

    And when I wanted to start installing the planks, assembling the tools I need, I found out that my long 5.5 mm drillbit was missing. The one I only bought a few weeks ago and used to drill for the screws when I installed the knees on the side. Under normal circumstances I would have just dropped everything, drive to the shop in Alcobaça (17 K to the east) and buy a new one. Under normal circumstances ... But, we were in Lockdown and I wasn't allowed to leave my Conselho. Having nothing else to do I turned everything in the boat upside down, then the workshop, then the caravan. Nothing. The drillbit has disappeared in thin air ...

    Finally Wednesday came and I was allowed to go to Alcobaça to get a new one. And then start with the job

    IMG_0781.jpg

    IMG_0779.jpg

    I've used my usual Sikaflex as bedding-material and installed the bottom-plank only, drilling the holes on the next ones for installation in one go. And of course I went wrong with the first hole

    IMG_0785.jpg

    There were some hardwood roundpieces in my workshop. In 14 mm, 10 mm and 6 mm. What I needed was 8 mm. I roughly carved it down with a knife and wanted to sand it round and nice with the drill, but it took ages and I wasn't too pleased although it was working. You can guess, I made another mistake with the last hole. This time I used the drill again, together with the angle-grinder and a soft wood-sanding disc. That worked and the thing was done in minutes.

    IMG_0783.jpg
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
    www.tongabonds.com

  6. #1091
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    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    IMG_0786.jpg

    Getting the angle right was by far more easy when I could have a proper view at the inside I found out. To drill plank no. 4 I clamped her in place and then took the planks below out again to have a better idea about what I'm doing.

    To install the top-plank I first needed to sort out the corners on top, something the shipwright had left to be properly adjusted later. To get the angle as perfect as possible I used my japanese saw.

    IMG_0787.jpg

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    There was this bolt on the starboard-side which was installed a bit too high, interfering with the rest.

    IMG_0791.jpg

    With the help of my Fein Multimaster and the blades for wood/metal I managed to get the corner okay. The head of the bolt is sticking up for maybe 1.5 mm, so I will just sand it flush.

    IMG_0793.jpg

    and that's where I left the job on Thursday. I wanted to install everything on Friday but there is a new lockdown for this and the next weekend and friends of mine, who had just come back to the boat, needed to get some big supermarket-shopping done which meant I took them up there and did my shopping as well. Saves me the trip I had planned for next week.
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
    www.tongabonds.com

  7. #1092
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    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    Congratulations. This means you can now start on the rear deck and have the whole boat closed by Christmas.

  8. #1093
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    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    Thanks Rumars, we'll see how it goes weather and lockdowns permitting
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
    www.tongabonds.com

  9. #1094
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    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    Looks great Dody. Nice to see the progress! Stay safe and well out there. We are getting locked down again here in Seattle too. Not quite the stay-at-home order we were under last spring (although we probably should be, given where the numbers are going) but much stricter than it has been for the last few months.
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  10. #1095
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    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    Thank you Chris, and hope you stay safe and happy too! Actually I would like everyone here to stay safe and happy!!! I'm still very lucky right here where I am, the numbers keep low profile. But the North, the Lisboa-area and now the Algarve are badly hit and things getting out of control. The medical system here was never made to deal with something like this, non-essential surgery had to be postponed since the beginning of the pandemic and now they are out of hospital beds and intensive care units, medical staff is missing everywhere and we're getting to the point where choices have to be made. We've all got to remember that Portugal is a small country, and most people are very aware of the situation.
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
    www.tongabonds.com

  11. #1096
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    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    Still breaking my head how to integrate the chainplates for the backstays of the mizzen into this scenario. After sanding the planks plane to each other, there will be two plywood-sheets in 6 mm on top. I need to figure out some way where they are not visible on the outside, don't interfere with the installation of the windsteering I need to install, don't get in the way in case I can't find a different solution for the exhaust as it was ...

    Before, there were 2 inox-strips hidden inside the construction, the top of which bolted into the pulpit, and the backstays were attached to the pulpit. It was certainly strong enough for Hurrciane Bill, but I would like to find a better solution. The backstays can't go directly to the stern because they would interfere with the length of the boom of the mizzen. The boom is brand-new and the sail too, so I have no intentions at all to shorten this instead. But .... there must be an elegant way and I've got to find it.
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
    www.tongabonds.com

  12. #1097
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    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    You could mount them on the inside of the fashion piece, bolted to it and the transom (use spacers). Or you could use U bolts trough the transom beam with backing plates underneath. That would be the least intrusive option.

  13. #1098
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    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    Thank you Rumars and Dave!

    The 2 layers of cloth is what I would like to apply, and I have been thinking it over and over and will only do 2 layers of ply on the whole hull. Which means on the stern as well.

    Concerning the chainplates aft I'm wondering if it would be possible to fold up bidiagonal fibreglass to some kind of thickness and glass it in between the two layers of ply instead of backing with an inox-strip from the inside? Not for the other chainplates coz I'm not sure how strong this really will be, but the backstays of the mizzen don't put tremendous forces on the hull as far as I think. The sail-area is only 13 m2 with 3 reefs and the spreaders are swept backwards (the mainmast is different!!!).
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
    www.tongabonds.com

  14. #1099
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    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    Yes it's possible, they are called composite chainplates. Since you want to drill holes in the transom I would put them on the hull sides, you have enough hull under the transoms corner for it. The fiberglass either goes over the ply layers and under the fiberglass ones, or on top of the fiberglass. If you put it in between the ply layers you have a lot of problems with glueing the next layer over an unfair surface, piercing the uni fiberglass with staples, and final fairing.
    Are this running backstays?

  15. #1100
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    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    I'm not quite sure if I understand you correctly Rumars what exactly you mean with the hullsides and the hull "under the transom corner"? Maybe I think this through again, but right now it's not clear to me. Also, if I put them on top of the fibreglass they would stick out, wouldn't they? Or did I get this wrong?

    I thought more about a different way - but maybe it's not a good idea after all: make a groove both sides at the places where I need them into the first layer of plywood going from top to bottom. Size, I don't know yet, maybe 60 or 70 mm wide and 4 mm or so deep. Fold up bidiagonal fibreglass into several layers to reach the desired thickness and glass them in with something flat and a weight on top till cured - like this I should end up with a fair and flat surface. Over this one layer of glass with epoxy to key it over the whole surface, install it and then install the second layer of ply on top of it.

    It's normal backstays for the mizzen-mast, not running backstays. The mast is deck-stepped and 11 m long.
    Last edited by Dody; 11-17-2020 at 03:47 PM.
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
    www.tongabonds.com

  16. #1101
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    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    How about posting a sketch of how the backstay was integrated into the pulpit?We might be able to dream up a solution.

  17. #1102
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    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    Of course!!! Thanks for reminding me John, I completely forgot about it, cool! I might even have a picture from before. And, there is something else. When brushing my teeth at the tap this morning my eyes fell on something I completely forgot that this was part of the system too. Will see what I can dig up tomorrow
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
    www.tongabonds.com

  18. #1103
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    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    I mean the backstay attachment point is on the intersection of hull and transom, but the chainplate is on the hullside not the transom. When you do composite chainplates they don't look like metal ones, the strips of unidirectional glass fan out onto the hull more or less into a semicircle. Since your transom is angled forward you have enough space for this.
    http://marine.marsh-design.com/conte...omposite-hulls

  19. #1104
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    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    Okay, I see what you mean. And also that they are using unidirectional glass. And use the same material for attachment. Thank you Rumars!
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
    www.tongabonds.com

  20. #1105
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    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    I'm not really good with sketches, but I took some photos instead. It shows how it was before. That doesn't mean it's got to be again like this, but it's something to start with.

    The mizzen-backstay of the starboard-side attaches here:

    IMG_0796.jpg

    The whole lot in overview:

    IMG_0797.jpg

    Connection to the stern was done with bolts here:

    IMG_0798.jpg

    and this stainless plate was attached to the stern and is where it keyed into with the bolts:

    IMG_0800.jpg

    The whole thing was covered in several layers of glass and paint on top. There was also 2 inox-strips (can't find them at the moment), which were somewhere hidden inside but, strange enough, not bolted to something.
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
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  21. #1106
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    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    Stainless steel transom, that's a first.
    The strips of uni get laminated directly onto the thull, you lay half of the lenght on in a nice fanned pattern, wet them out, put a wedge with a metal tube on, then fold the other half of the strips down over the tube and wet them with epoxy. Over the whole thing you lay a piece of biax fabric to keep everything flat to the hull.

    May I ask why your transom has those "horns"? Are you planning to transform them into cleats?

  22. #1107
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    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    These "horns" will form the end-part of the toerail later, however that will go ...
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
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  23. #1108
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    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    Since the old arrangement worked,why would you deviate too far from the concept?I don't think I have ever seen a stainless secondary transom like that before.I hope that a sturdy frame around the transom will cope with the loads coming from all directions and I suspect a number of backing plates may have to find their way in there.Do you plan to repeat the size and shape of the former toe rail?That could also help with the loads and I do wonder whether a short supplementary backstay from the former attachment point to the transom frame might be a good move as I don't see much that is preventing the top rail from being pulled forward by the backstay loads.

  24. #1109
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    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    Hmmmm .... I didn't plan on re-using the stainless-plate, but somehow, now that you made me think about it .... I guess I'll have another proper look at it tomorrow. A short supplementary backstay is definitely a good idea, if with or without the stainless-plate. If I should re-use the plate, the pushpit would bolt into it. Which means it can't be pulled forward by the backstays. The only thing that needs doing is making everything watertight before I install the plate. And find a nice way how to finish it all off on the outside. And yes, I love my proper toerail, the new one will be similar if not identical to what I have/had.
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
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  25. #1110
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    For the first time in years I can claim my boat has a closed stern :-D!

    Sent from my SM-G900FD using Tapatalk
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
    www.tongabonds.com

  26. #1111
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    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    Quote Originally Posted by Dody View Post
    For the first time in years I can claim my boat has a closed stern :-D!

    Sent from my SM-G900FD using Tapatalk
    Must be a great feeling to have things going back together at last. That entire aft area has been a mission!

    Pete

  27. #1112
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    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    Thank you Pete!!! It has been a mission, and I'm still not through with it, but at least it's closed and it feels sooo awesome !
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
    www.tongabonds.com

  28. #1113
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    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    It's been a long time and a lot has happened, unfortunately hardly anything boat-related. The worst was the disappearance of my lovely little companion Mr. Max the cat the 10th of January.

    I had 3 days before the winter-rains set in - at that time I was still confident that it's only gonna rain for a few days, but I was wrong. 3 days are plenty to sand the stern-planking, prepare everything, epoxy-filler-glue 2 sheets of plywood on and seal them with a coat of Epoxy. Easy-peasy will be the reply of everyone. I had just got the tools out when my new neighbor had the idea that he actually should do what he could have done 2 days ago: pressure-washing his boat below the waterline, which took him 2 entire days. Meanwhile the forecast had changed to worse so I installed all my covers for protection and battened down the hatches so to speak.

    This winter was weird. Not cold but wet, very wet and it kept on going. Slowly it calmed down a bit. Great, let's do it!

    Whatever I touched from this moment on went wrong, got complicated or didn't want to work at all. Progress at slower than snail's pace.

    Sanding went okay, filler went okay, cutting the sheets went okay, I was ready for the Epoxy-Filler-glue.

    IMG_20210407_152745.jpg

    IMG_20210408_130734.jpg

    IMG_20210416_145254.jpg

    The plan was to do the sheet that goes directly on the Iroko-planks with G-Flex Epoxy. Till this moment I had never worked with G-Flex and for me this was also about testing out how best to handle this stuff before I - hopefully one day - come to the strips that go onto the hull in a 45 º angle. To tell the truth the unbelievable happened and I only succeeded at the 6th day with the job.

    Day 1: I had set the whole workspace up including tools and materials ready to go when I thought hang on wait a minute, better try out the new nailgun with the Iroko! Got me a scrap-piece & a scrap of ply, bang, and the nail was sticking out 5 mm or so. Oh, I remember now, there was an adjustment! Changed the settings, bang, and the nail was still sticking out 3 mm. Oh no! Wait! Maybe there is some Info to be found in the instructions! There was: the compressor-hose shouldn't be longer than 10 m max. Right, I'm definitely not gonna cut my lovely long 25 m hose down! I still had about 25 m of compressor-hose in my workshop but couldn't find any spare fittings.

    Day 2: Off to Alcobaça to buy the fittings. Assembled the new hose but the fitting at the compressor doesn't fit my new fitting. Off to Alcobaça again to get a different fitting for the compressor. Assembled and leak-free. Result of the next test: the nail is still sticking out about 1 mm. Slightly raised the pressure to the max. I wasn't meant to overstep (8 Bar) but it didn't really make a difference. Okay ... the rest has to go in with the hammer then. Meanwhile a new boat got craned out and the started pressure-washing right next to me, grrrrrrrr!

    Day 3: Everything set up and ready to go again. The damn lids of the G-Flex tins didn't want to come open. I definitely don't want to damage them and unexpected help came from one of my neighbors who had a special tool for lids of paint-tins (got me 2 of them in the meantime!). Done! Now ... mixing the resin.

    When I ordered the stuff I got told to simply use 2 soup-ladles of the same volume, scrape the excess off with a spreader and mix. To be honest I found that very inaccurate so I wanted to use the big syringes instead, the type I had used for Epoxy before. Syringe into the tin, pulling the handle, nothing. This stuff is thick as honey - it should have occurred to me that something is different the moment I read in the instructions that I'm meant to cut the bristles of a brush in half or use a spreader ....
    Okay, it's got to be soup-ladles then! I did buy a pair ages ago, but they were silicone-ladles and I was scared to use them. Everything back to where it came from and off to Caldas da Rainha. There is a place where Hotels and Restaurants can buy their equipment, a heaven for soup-ladles in stainless all sizes from tiny to huge. I wasn't sure which size would turn out best so I bought 2 each in 8 different sizes. And a scale with proper buttons in an attempt to reach some grade of accuracy.

    Day 4: All set up and another boat got lifted out, and yes, pressure-washing of course! All back to where it came from

    Day 5: All set up and dark clouds kept piling up. I had checked the forecast the night before, but the weather doesn't always do what they think it's gonna do. But, at least, I had another idea concerning the syringes: the tip is pretty narrow, but it gets wider a bit up. Out came the saw and I cut off the tip from 2 new syringes. And I marked everything with colors so I don't accidentally mix anything up.

    Day 6: I tried the 45 ml ladles first so I'm not gonna waste a huge amount if it goes wrong. Yes, it did work although the ladles need scraping out and perfection is something very different. Thick as honey it wasn't that easy to work it in.
    Next batch I thought I'll try out the syringes with the cut-off tip to see if that would work. Tried the resin first and YES, it works! Tried the hardener with the same result, awesome!!! I had made the tips equal in length and I guess/hope this is accurate enough. From then on I continued with the syringes. Painted both sides, then mixed with filler and this applied with a notched spreader. All the nails had to get some bangs with the hammer and it was in, finally!!!

    The second sheet with "normal" Epoxy went in without problems. I coated it with Epoxy on the outside and had just finished the job when Finn (the new cat I adopted, mistaking him for Max in the photos the lady published when he suddenly turned up at her place, to keep the tomcats at bay ....) was determined to go off the stern to jump on the scaffolding (he still doesn't use the ladder). I couldn't make him understand yet and I wanted to spare him the misery Max had to go through when he was still little ... walking through fresh Epoxy and not getting this stuff off his paws for weeks. So ... I quickly chucked a plastic-sheet over it. The result doesn't look fancy to the eye once it had dried but it has to be sanded anyway and fibreglass is going on top of it later - so, it doesn't matter.

    Great, done!

    Now shape the top and you're ready to lay the deck, yippppeeeehhhh!

    I made the most accurate template I've ever done in my life

    IMG_20210504_161631.jpg

    cut the sheet and it wouldn't go in. No way. Not even with my 100 kg neighbor on one side and me on the other.

    IMG_20210507_145257.jpg

    Right, let's try smaller.

    cont ....
    Last edited by Dody; 07-03-2021 at 01:28 PM.
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
    www.tongabonds.com

  29. #1114
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    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    Cont ....

    Only smaller was not the answer, I still couldn't get it in coz I didn't have the leverage.

    And now what? 2 options: use thinner ply or try relieve-cuts. I tried the relieve-cuts first. It wasn't clear till the last minute if it would work but I had the impression that this can get pulled in with the screws. And yes, it did work.

    IMG_20210624_161851.jpg

    IMG_20210624_183717.jpg

    Of course now I was worried I might produce a water-trap at a place where I really don't want to have it. I first spread a bead of Epoxy-Resin over each slit, distributing it more or less evenly with a tiny brush inside, then mixed Epoxy with filler trying not to make the mix too thick hoping it will sink deep enough into the slits. It was more or less successful, I re-worked both ends again to make sure and I can see that it seems to have worked in most places. I will chuck some normal Epoxy-filler on top and guess/hope it's okay like that. However, sanding is done.

    IMG_20210702_151726.jpg

    IMG_20210702_151810.jpg
    Attached Images Attached Images
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
    www.tongabonds.com

  30. #1115
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
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    Nazaré, Portugal
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    945

    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    I couldn't upload this picture with the last post ...

    IMG_20210702_171346.jpg
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
    www.tongabonds.com

  31. #1116
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    EU
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    980

    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    Thanks for the update Dody, good progress, keep it up.

  32. #1117
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Nazaré, Portugal
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    945

    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    Thank you Rumars! Any progress is good progress no matter how slow, I really have to calm down about it!

    I installed 8 more screws aft yesterday, onto the frame aft, just to make really sure nothing goes wrong there one day. Cleaned up the mess and now fillering.

    When installing this tiny sheet I noticed that the screws at the stringers made another big difference in pulling the sheet in. The next one will be with the same problem, so I will install another set of stringers close to the centerline. And actually, after sorting this problem I realized something: when I took the old deck off I was very surprised to find tiny little pieces of ply of only 6 mm installed aft instead of 9 mm in bigger sheets as everywhere else. I guess I found the reason why!
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
    www.tongabonds.com

  33. #1118
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
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    EU
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    980

    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    Just remember, perfect is the enemy of good. You are rebuilding the boat to a much higher standard then original anyway, don't loose sleep about such little things. Just keep doing it, you are doing well, the boat will soon be closed and waterproof. Thank you for the photos, it's nice to see the boat coming together.

  34. #1119
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
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    Nazaré, Portugal
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    945

    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    Got the stringers done, ready to go in tomorrow.

    About an hour ago I got a text from Albertino (the shipwright), he's available now - which possibly means Saturday, but knowing him this could also be tomorrow. It's about closing Tonga below and chucking some missing planks in. I'm waiting for this to happen since about 2 years, but the fishing-boats have priority of course.

    However, to do this job I've been trying to dig up some oak in 10.5 cm x 10.5 cm about 2.50 m long. No success yet. It seems that the US have bought up most of the European and UK market and are not sending anything over. Prices have gone through the roof for what is left. I managed to get my hands on some planks (American White Oak) in 27 mm and bought them in kind of a panic of not being able to do this part of the job at all. The idea behind it: laminating them up with West to the thickness I need. Took them to the carpenters in the neighboring village and had them planed down (to about 25 mm or a bit less).

    Now I can't find my Gougeon-Brothers book about wooden boat construction (I know I've seen this there!!!) and to be honest I haven't got a clue if 25 mm is doable with oak or if I have to go thinner??? Just to get kind of a bigger audience for this question I've started a new thread here: http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...t-System-Epoxy

    Pictures tomorrow, promised!
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
    www.tongabonds.com

  35. #1120
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
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    Nazaré, Portugal
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    945

    Default Re: Re-building my Ketch Tonga (1960)

    Soooo ... if there is not another emergency Albertino will be here on Monday, yippppeeeehhhh!

    I'll do the laminating today, hoping that curing-time is sufficient so we can work on the piece on Monday.

    And here comes the shopping session, I was really excited although I still don't trust a laminated piece!

    IMG_20210604_142449.jpg

    IMG_20210604_142454-001.jpg


    The oak-planks were a bit longer than what I can get into my car, so my mates lent me their truck which was really nice and made my life easy!

    IMG_20210604_144113.jpg

    IMG_20210607_143918-001.jpg

    IMG_20210607_154912-001.jpg
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
    www.tongabonds.com

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