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Thread: 1949 18' Dunphy sailboat

  1. #1

    Default 1949 18' Dunphy sailboat

    Hello fellow forum members

    Today I had the winning bid on a 1949 Dunphy 18' cold molded sailboat, actually I was the only one to bid on this boat, lucky for me?
    It looks like the previous owner had started the restoration, and I guess lost interest, so he donated the boat to our local boating museum for their annual auction, this is were I come in.
    From the looks of things this boat must have spent most of it's life under cover, the hull is in near perfect shape, and I can't find any rot anywhere. All the original rigging and parts look to be there, along with what looks like the original cotton sail?

    I tried a Google search on Dunphy sailboats, and I didn't come up with anything, so I'm hoping someone here might have a little information about the boat they would like to pass on.
    With winter surely heading this way, I am looking forward to getting into the shop and finishing the restoration on this little beauty, now if I could only figure out how to get a photo host, so I could post pics. It is hard to teach old dogs new trick.

    Wayne

  2. #2
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    Default Re: 1949 18' Dunphy sailboat

    Many years ago, I restored a similiarly built boat, a 1959 Highlander sloop. Your construction is not cold-molded, but rather hot molded. Epoxy wasn't in use then, but another glue that required low pressure and heat to cure. They'd lay up a hull and stick it in a low pressure, high heat chamber. There was a video here recently showing a Fireball hull being built this way, if you can find it.
    Welcome and good luck with your project!
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

  3. #3

  4. #4
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    Default Re: 1949 18' Dunphy sailboat

    Dunphy was a builder for the post war middle class. The one I know about was plywood; did not know they did cold molded.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: 1949 18' Dunphy sailboat

    We had a Dunphy Condor in Wisconsin, built around 1940. 18 foot carvel planked, steel centerboard, running backstays replaced by a single backstay on a short A frame off the rear deck, a few lead pigs for ballast. Nice boat raced in handicap races for many years by prior original owner, raced by me after my father bought it. Dragged the mooring in a blow around about 1969 and received some planking damage. Gave the boat away to a young man and lost track of it. We have photos somewhere. The boat always looked good.

    You can find Dunphy ads in old magazines, for example:

    https://books.google.com/books?id=X1...ilboat&f=false

    I found a brochure on line once, but have lost the bookmark.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: 1949 18' Dunphy sailboat

    Just noticed your pics. The condor had an outboard rudder. Much heavier boat too.

  7. #7

    Default Re: 1949 18' Dunphy sailboat

    Dave Wright
    Thanks for the link, the photo in the add is the same as my boat, very cool.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: 1949 18' Dunphy sailboat

    A long time ago.

    The "DC" on the sails is "Dunphy Condor. A. M. Deering based in Chicago was the designer. I imagine your boat would look similar with restoration. I have some color slides, but not internet ready. Keep poking around the internet, you may get more info, I'm 70, so the information pool is shrinking.

  9. #9

    Default Re: 1949 18' Dunphy sailboat

    Dunphy Boat was a major builder of pleasure boats. Located originally at Eau Claire, WI founded circa 1861 (not the 1854 that is often quoted). They moved to Oshkosh, WI in the 1930s and Cully Foster became owner. After WW II they made HOT MOLDED boats, including row boats, speed boats, and sail boats. The hot molded hulls were thin veneer layers stapled together and slathered with adhesive and placed on a mandral and then put into an autoclave. There is a great video of their manufacturing process which is on youtube.

    They also made planked on frame boats and strip built hulls. They switched to plywood lapstrake construction in the late 1950s.

    Dunphy built many one-design sailboats including Snipe and SeaGull class.

    Dunphy Boat brochures have been scanned and placed on CD-ROM. I am not certian who is selling them these days.

    Andreas

  10. #10
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    Apr 1999
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    Default Re: 1949 18' Dunphy sailboat

    Did you buy it at the finger lakes museum auction if so where do you live my shop is in Horseheads I can advise you along the way if you wish. Dunphy boats are not to bad to work on as long as the hull veneer has not started to delaminate.
    Charlie

  11. #11
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    Lightbulb Re: 1949 18' Dunphy sailboat

    There is a collection of 14 Dunphy catalogs from 1920 to 1964 available from http://store.wcha.org/The-Historic-W...-2-CD-ROM.html and yours appears to be their Condor model 4175-CK as others mentioned. This is shown below from their 1941 catalog. Other versions of the Condor were available with an outboard rudder. Good luck with the restoration,

    Benson


    Last edited by Benson Gray; 09-28-2016 at 07:19 AM.

  12. #12

    Default Re: 1949 18' Dunphy sailboat

    Thanks Charlie, I did get the boat at the Finger Lakes Museum auction, as far as restoration, all I'll have to do to this boat is a little light sanding, priming and paint, thanks for offering your help.
    I find she is in great original shape, looks like original paint as well. And no delamination in any of the planks, and thats a good thing.

    Benson Gray, That is an awesome add, It does look like my boat, except the one in the add looks to be plank on frames.
    The add says it will easily accommodate eight persons, It seems to me that it would be a little tight for eight people? The other thing I found interesting in the add is, it says The keel and (Combination Keel and centerboard, which mine is) are non- capsizable crafts, how true would that be?

    Dave Wright, great pic of a DC in action. Thank you.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: 1949 18' Dunphy sailboat

    Enjoy her and thank you for supporting the auction

  14. #14
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    Default Re: 1949 18' Dunphy sailboat

    Our Dunphy Condor had the steel plate centerboard and lead ballast pigs inboard along the centerboard trunk. The former owner, avid sailor, mentor, and good friend removed the lead pigs for significant performance improvement in handicap races. We drove that boat hard, all of us were experienced, and we never capsized. However, I saw the boat capsize on two occasions when it was being used by less experienced people. You could get 8 in the cockpit but we seldom had more than 3. The boat was raced weekly from spring through the summer untilmlate fall, then hauled because of the ice. The carvel planking always shrank and several days of soaking were required every year when the boat was launched.

  15. #15
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    Default Re: 1949 18' Dunphy sailboat

    Spring 1959 maybe, my good friend's younger brother gets to bail out the Dunphy Condor after it has soaked up:


  16. #16

    Default Re: 1949 18' Dunphy sailboat

    What a great photo Dave, by the way, do you happen to remember the type of paint they used on the Dunphy Condors.

  17. #17
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    Default Re: 1949 18' Dunphy sailboat

    It was always oil based back then. The original owner's son and I have been life long friends. His father took lots of photos and may have saved odds and ends referencing the boat. My guess is that all of that stuff is in a rat's nest of various boxes at my friend's place and would be of great interest. I may bring the subject up with him when we next talk. You never know what odds and ends survive. I still keep my snowshoes in an old Ratsey and Lapthorn sailbag that used to contain one of the jibs for that boat.

  18. #18

    Default Re: 1949 18' Dunphy sailboat

    When I took ownership of the boat I also received a folder with it's past history (as far as registrations) and a packet of recent restoration photos, one of the under the rear deck pics showed in writing that it was #9 Condor, made me think, how many Condors were made?
    I also found out that in at least 1958, the name of the boat was BILJA.

  19. #19

    Default Re: 1949 18' Dunphy sailboat

    I hate to mess with something that works, but I was thinking about the difficulties in trailer sailing this sailboat, mostly raising the mast, the mast is looking to be the better part of 26' long and it sits on a bracket on the deck, with nothing to stabilize it but the shrouds and stays, this seams perfectly fine if you plan to leave the mast up all season, but a pain in the butt other wise.
    My first thoughts were to add a tabernacle to aid in raising the mast, this would also add support, then I thought of changing the mast set up altogether and switching over to a Balanced lug and mizzen, or maybe a Gunter yawl, like you would find on a Caledonia Yawl. This would shorten up the mast considerably, not to mention it would look great, I love me a balanced lug and mizzen set up. So what do you think, keep it the way it is,restore it and send it on it's way? or mess around with it and use it??

  20. #20
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    Default Re: 1949 18' Dunphy sailboat - Condor is a clone of an Arrow

    This thread is a few years old, but it has the most info I've found in one place on Condor sailboats. As such, I thought the info below on the origins of the Condor might be of interest.


    Per info from the Wilmette Harbor Club/Sheridan Shore Yacht Club web site (why there are two names has to do with the lease on their building, I think), the Condor is a clone of the Arrow sailboat, both designed by A.M. "Gus" Deering.


    There is one active Arrow fleet, at the Sheridan Shore Yacht Club. The SSYC was behind the creation of the Arrow in 1938, as well as its conversion from wood to fiberglass starting in the late 50s.


    <https://wilmetteharbor.org/sheridan-shore-yacht-club-racing-history>
    [See section on the Arrow class. Note that the Wilmette Harbor Club info misspells Dunphy as "Dumphey".]


    Since I'm not sure how much I can quote, I'll summarize:
    A group at the Sheridan Shore Yacht Club in Wilmette, IL started sailing Cape Cod Knockabouts, and a local version called the Hunter Knockabout, in the mid-1930s. One member thought the boats could be better built, and got Chicago naval architect A.M. "Gus" Deering to design what became the Arrow. They got a cabinet maker named Jens Christensen to build the boats, and had 8 at the club for the 1938 season.


    Deering asked Christensen for royalties, but was told by a lawyer who was one of the Arrow sailors that, because he'd been paid in full for the design, there would be no royalties paid. Deering then sold the design, with a revised sail plan, to Dunphy Boats, which sold it as the Condor.


    The other main differences are that the Condor offered a keel or keel/centerboard combination, in addition to a centerboard model, and also offered a both a keel and a transom mounted rudder.


    So the Condor is a clone of the Arrow.


    I've not been able to find a count for how many Condors were made, but it appears that they had much wider advertising and distribution than Arrows did. SailboatData.com estimates that fewer than 200 Arrows have been built. However, unlike the Condor, the Arrow made a transition to fiberglass starting in 1959. An Arrow mold apparently still exists, so it's possible more will be made. I've not been able to find out if plans for the wooden Arrow/Condor still exist.
    There's an image of an Arrow here:
    <https://sailboatdata.com/sailboat/arrow>
    (I'd link to the photo, but this is my first post here, and the instructions on what can be posted seem draconian.)



    The Condor was one of the boats I learned to sail on at a summer camp in western North Carolina 1969-77. At the time the camp had a wide collection of wooden boats, including three Lightnings, two Y-Flyers, two Snipes, two Penguins, a Windmill, and even a Wee Scot. The Wee Scot was a ridiculous pig on a small Duke Power lake in the mountains.


    The two oldest boats were a pair of classic Moths, which may have dated from the late 1920s. There were also several rarely used "racing" Moths, which may have been Ventnor Moths, made of very thin plywood. The only wooden sailboats the camp had which I've not been able to identify were a pair just called "Dinghy", which looked a bit like a smaller single sail version of a Blue Jay. They were likely almost as old as the two Moths.


    Tha camp also had a fleet of wooden Old Town canoes, a few of them rigged to be used as sailing canoes. All the wooden sailboats are now gone, but the camp has maintained the wooden canoes. For many years now the camp has had a canoe building program which turns out one or two new wooden canoes each summer, essentially copies of the Old Town canoes.


    - 14ALL
    Last edited by 14ALL; 04-13-2021 at 06:25 PM.

  21. #21
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    Default Re: 1949 18' Dunphy sailboat - Condor is a clone of an Arrow

    I really like reading about this stuff. A boat has to have a story.

  22. #22
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    Default Re: 1949 18' Dunphy sailboat

    My sailing club in SE Australia has run 7 Classic Wooden Dinghy Regattas, interupted this year by Covid.
    Here is a link to the galleries of pics and some videos taken at the 3 day event in January.
    The conversations on the beach are at lest as interesting as the sailing, but the Rum and Lolly treasure chest treasure hunt tops it all!
    https://sgycinverloch.com.au/?page_id=1307
    https://moth.asn.au/resources/Site/H...Highlights.pdf
    https://australiansailfish.wordpress...nverloch-cwdr/

    Thought you might be interested.
    Last edited by skuthorp; 04-14-2021 at 07:08 PM.

  23. #23
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    Default Re: 1949 18' Dunphy sailboat

    I have two Dunphy wooden Snipes; also lived in Oshkosh and am familiar with the old Dunphy factory site. It was good to see this thread come back around. I have some of the old Dunphy catalogs on CD and have read their promotional material on the Condors they were selling. I was told there are hardly any pre war Dunphy snipes that are known to still exist. The OP probably has a very rare boat.

    Jim

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