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Thread: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

  1. #106
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    i think im going to have to try this flame way..

  2. #107
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Following up on the discussion of paint stripping methods and in the interest of knowledge and experimentation I did some research on chemical strippers since it's been at least a decade since I last used them. Turns out that the various "eco" strippers take a long time to work. Reviews indicated anything from 4-6 hours up to 10 hours working time. "The heck with that!" I thought. "I'm going for the good stuff" and bought a quart can of Jasco at Fisheries Supply yesterday.

    Back at the boat I masked off the deck, donned gloves, safety glasses and long sleeves and started slathering it on. Yup - it was just as nasty as I remembered. But nasty means effective right? The goop quickly started eating away the paint which bubbled up ready to slough off. I waited the recommended 15 minutes and started scraping. The top layer or two came off very easily but that still left several layers to go. Hmmmm. Another coat of paint remover and this time I determined to be more patient. While waiting I set about removing the rubber coating from the deck - another project that I had been meaning to tackle.

    After another 30 minutes or so I tried again. With similar results. The Jasco would take off 2-3 layers at a time but no more. After several applications and over an hour I had only stripped about half of the area I was working on. And I hated every minute of it. So I cleaned up and called it a day.



    I'm sure paint remover is the right solution in many cases. When I wood the bottom I will probably try again since that's not a job I want to do with a heat gun for many reasons. But for this project I really prefer heat and a scraper. This morning I went back down and finished the port side of the trunk cabin in about three hours.



    Then I turned Petrel around so I can do the other side tomorrow.



    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  3. #108
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Looking good Chris! I can share the pain a little bit. Stripping paint an old door so it can be the new old entry door to my new powder and mud room on the back of my old house. I finally gave in, got a gallon of stripper.. nasty but it works! after scraping, I use sawdust, rub it with wire brushes to pick up the sticky mass, does a pretty good job too!
    Denise, Bristol PA, retired from HVAC business, & boat restoration and building

  4. #109
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Great thread and great project, so congrats on both and thanks for posting!

    One really cool paint stripping trick told to me by fellow forumite RFNK (Rick) is to cover the area with a meths soaked rag and cling film and leave it overnight, then reveal and peel. Most paint comes off pretty quickly but you have to work very fast, and I mean really, really fast, so it's best done in small sections. If you can figure out a way of doing it in multiple small sections then you should be able to remove quite a bit in one session. I also use a linbide scraper to remove paint, but you have to be careful not to gouge the timber with it. Not sure if you can get such a tool in the USA though.
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  5. #110
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Thanks Denise! I have a door to do as well (restoring an old door for our basement bathroom in my case). I may try chemical stripper for that project. I think it would be easier to use on a workbench project where the environment is more controlled. I just find it too much of a hassle on the boat.

    Duncan, do you mean methanol/denatured alcohol? The solvent would evaporate pretty quickly after removing the cling film and the rag so makes sense that one would have to work very fast. I could see that being less messy but I'm not sure it would work on a vertical surface at all? Also frighteningly flammable!
    - Chris

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  6. #111
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Duncan is talking about "Methylated Spirits", purple colour, used to light the BBQ if you use charcoal.
    Also served chilled in some parts of Australia I hear.

  7. #112
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Chris, yes the door is in my basement too, must of had 5 lbs of paint on it!
    Denise, Bristol PA, retired from HVAC business, & boat restoration and building

  8. #113
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Finished stripping the starboard side of the cabin today. Now just need to deal with the aft side of the pilothouse then I can move on to sanding and eventually paint.



    However in scraping this side of the cabin I found that the staves are coming loose at the bottom in several places, and are generally in worse shape than the port side. I think I can get away with refastening them at least for now. We'll see...
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  9. #114
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    We took Snoose to the Olympia Harbor Fest again this year over this weekend. They call it a tugboat fest so we have always felt a little guilty about being a fishing boat. But they have always welcomed us and they have now made it very clear that they want more boats attending. So they are inviting all loosely defined work boats from now on. Only tugboats will race, but the rest of the show is a lot of fun, especially watching kids come aboard your boat. You can see their eyes get wider and the wheels turning. Both boys and girls really respond to these boats.

    So your goal is to have Petrel ready for Olympia next Labor Day. They treat us like royalty all weekend with free vests and hats and dock space and even a free salmon dinner. I really hope you can make it next year so I won't be the only one constantly telling people we are not a tugboat. But seeing your progress so far I have no doubt you will be ready.

  10. #115
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Sounds like a great show Ron! Any photos? I'm definitely a goals-and-deadlines kinda guy and that seems like a good one to me. So it's a plan. Olympia next year.
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  11. #116
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Boy, you want to get some paint on that before the the monsoon starts. A boathouse would be good for you.

  12. #117
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by pcford View Post
    Boy, you want to get some paint on that before the the monsoon starts. A boathouse would be good for you.
    Believe me I know. I can feel the rain coming already. This summer has slipped by very fast. Losing a few weeks with the bum rib didn't help any either. But I think I have enough time. Looking back to last year I was still sanding the hull in mid-September and it worked out. Just managed to get the paint done under the wire though - I painted the bottom in the rain. But if the weather doesn't cooperate this year then yes, I may be hunting for a covered slip in which I can finish the job.
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  13. #118
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Chris be you sad or glad it's not mahogany (can't tell in the pics) and wanting to do varnish? Love the way the the pilot house and cabin are curved.
    Denise, Bristol PA, retired from HVAC business, & boat restoration and building

  14. #119
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Not mahogany or anything fancy. Just plain old Douglas Fir. Or maybe cedar - I haven't looked at it that closely. But I'm not even remotely tempted to varnish anything! At most the only exterior brightwork will be the pilothouse windows. I'm going to paint the bulwark caps and rub rails. They are finished bright now but the varnish is almost all gone and the wood is very weathered. At one point I was thinking of keeping them bright and stripping the foredeck for an oil finish as well but I want to go boating far more than I want fancy brightwork so it's all going to be painted.

    This is what I'm aiming for, minus the varnish (and with a significantly lower quality of finish)



    Green hull, off-white sheer band and house, bristol beige decks. That's the William Hand. Currently for sale if you have a spare million dollars. And absolutely the first thing I would buy if I won the lottery. So pretty...
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  15. #120
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    I can appreciate how tedious that is, its looking really good. She will look great with even just a coat of primer!

  16. #121
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    I didn't take any pictures at Harbor fest this year Chris, not sure why. I'll see if I can round some up from previous years. There were 21 boats this year, only about 3 or 4 of us non-tugs. But they definitely want more of us next year. The tug owners are great people and full of knowledge about these old boats and the engines, many Detroit Diesels. Petrel would certainly fit right in. And boy do these guys know how to handle big slow turning single prop boats. (Galene's prop is 7'-6" diameter.)

    Here's a thread from a few years ago with some pix.
    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...ht=Olympia+tug
    Last edited by ron ll; 09-06-2016 at 06:49 PM.

  17. #122
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Good progress!

  18. #123
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Thanks nedL and Phil Y. Encouragement motivates more progress! Ron, I like the photos from the previous Olympia event. More motivation...
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  19. #124
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    I feel your pain. Boy--that was a big job--congrats on getting it done.
    Chuck Thompson

  20. #125
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    A bit more progress this week. Just about finished stripping paint on the pilothouse aft bulkhead and this morning we unstepped the mast for repair.



    However I took a closer look at the misaligned trunk cabin side and found that the problem is not that the staves have come loose (although some do need to be refastened) but that a scarf is failing in the lower cleat to which the staves are attached, allowing the whole works to bulge outward. Every part of the boat is fastened with plain iron nails which are all well past their life expectancy so I suspect I'll be dealing with issues like this for as long as I have Petrel.





    I'm thinking that the solution is to bring everything back in line, either by using a wedge against the bulwarks or with a cable running across the cabin from a couple of eyebolts in the cleat to pull it back together. Then run a couple of bolts through it. Unless anyone else has a better idea? But in any case that's a project for this winter. I'm just trying to get some paint on it right now before the rain starts, as Pat has cautioned.
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  21. #126
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    What are your future plans for rear of boat Chris and that "cockpit" at the stern? I imagine that's the hold under that deck? Be a nice place for a "verandah" out there if you could style it right.

  22. #127
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post

    I'm thinking that the solution is to bring everything back in line, either by using a wedge against the bulwarks or with a cable running across the cabin from a couple of eyebolts in the cleat to pull it back together. Then run a couple of bolts through it. Unless anyone else has a better idea? But in any case that's a project for this winter. I'm just trying to get some paint on it right now before the rain starts, as Pat has cautioned.
    I think that I would use eyebolts and tension, unless you are really confident about the strength of the bulwark. The advantage is that you can see the effect of winding on the tension as you are doing it, rather than having to shout at a helper.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  23. #128
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Nick, good point about the strength of the bulwark. I think they are plenty strong and that it won't take much force to bring the cabin back into true but definitely something to consider. The cable might be easier in any case. More thought needed!

    Andrew, yes - there is a sizable fish hold under the aft deck. Most of the deck and other structure aft of the pilothouse was was removed and replaced when the aft cabin was added (see the photo at the beginning of this thread for what that looked like). Originally it probably looked something like this:



    Eventually my goal is to return it to be closer to this layout by rebuilding the aft deck with a small doghouse over the hatch and two berths below. That's a typical setup for these boats when converted to pleasure use and leaves plenty of deck space for lounging. For example:



    and

    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  24. #129
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    Oh, ya sure ya betcha. My shop is in Ballard, Seattle, WA, the West Coast spiritual home of all things Scandinavian, so old Saabs and Volvos are mandatory. I have a couple of 1968 Saab 96s. One really pretty but with completely rusted out floors and one solid but very shabby driver. I keep meaning to make one decent car between the two. Some day.
    Neat, I have a '68 96 but it is a bit different. I converted it to rear wheel drive, turbocharged the Mazda motor, moved firewall back 11" and made it a two seater. It's not quite done yet but getting close.


  25. #130
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    You could try a wall framing technique utilizing a kicker and brace to draw that cleat in under complete control. Fine homebuilding has a YouTube video but I can't get to the link from my phone. I'll post a link when I get near a laptop, or someone here might get to it first. I'd want that back in and secure before I went too far with sealing and painting for the winter rains. / Jim

  26. #131
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Jim, the kicker and brace might work. I found this example: http://www.finehomebuilding.com/1982...wall-bracing-2. Is that what you mean? I have several options at least. I would like to get it done before paint for sure but it's all going to depend on how much time I can carve out for boat work over the next couple of weeks. I still have a bit of scraping to do, and I want to get some fasteners into the loose staves (actually would like to do all of them since the rest will go eventually). And fill/fair/sand, then primer then paint... Why didn't anyone tell me that boats were so much work!? I thought it was all supposed to be sunshine and margaritas on the aft deck.

    Stein, whoa - that's quite the car! Very impressive. Cheers!
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  27. #132
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    That's the idea Chris. The closer to horizontal you could set your brace the easier it should be. Good luck.

  28. #133
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Cool car Stein, I like it. Plenty of character. Should be fun to drive too.

  29. #134
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    Cool car Stein, I like it. Plenty of character. Should be fun to drive too.
    Thanks, should be a hoot with a bit over 300 hp vs the original 57!

  30. #135
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Just about done with scraping and about to break out the sander. Just in time too, I think. Forecast is for mixed sun/showers all next week. I'm hoping to get a coat of primer on everything before then. But at the same time my dilemma continues on what to do about the trunk cabin structure. There are no deck beams or traditional carlin between the forward edge of the cabin and the aft engine room bulkhead. Instead there is a shelf that sits on top of the sheer clamp and runs the entire length of the cabin. The side deck is laid directly on the shelf. Then there is a beam/stringer that I'll call a carlin, for lack of a better word (or is it a log? Perhaps Tad will step in to save me here), that runs around the outer edge of the cabin on top of the shelf and provides a landing for the sides. On top of this piece is a cleat to which the cabin side staves are fastened.

    Like so:



    From the top, staves, cleat, carlin, shelf. The joint between the carlin and the cleat is caulked with oakum. You can also see some of the problems I'm looking at. More on that later. Here is what things look like from the outside:



    The above photo shows the aft end of the carlin on the starboard side, along with the aftermost stave and the aft edge of the side deck planking (it will look a lot better when I'm done painting, I promise!)

    The problems are three:

    1. The carlin is made up of several discrete pieces which are not scarfed at the ends. In spots - and in particular the joint in the above photo - it is warping and opening up a significant gap top and bottom. I suspect that the iron drifts/bolts holding the whole thing together are pretty much gone at this point.

    2. The cleat is also coming loose. The cleat/carlin joint has opened up, as have several scarfs, to the point where I can see daylight through it in many spots.

    3. The staves surrounding the porthole castings are also coming loose since they are not fastened to anything at the ends that form the edge of the hole. You can see that happening in this photo - note how the tongue and groove joints are opening up:



    Since my main winter cabin build-out project is going to involve installation of several bulkheads that have to meet up with this structure I think I need to get it all straightened out before I can go much further. And of course as soon as I start doing that I suspect that all of the staves will move around, probably destroying any finish work I do before then. I should also note that photos from the winter of 2014-15, when Petrel was quite waterlogged, show things to be much tighter. My assumption is that in drying out the various pieces of wood have been allowed to warp because their original fastenings are no longer doing their job. Thus I aim to bring them back to their duty through the addition of more fastenings.

    So my plan, which I submit for review and comment, is as follows:

    1. Drive 3/8" galvanized lag screws from the shelf into the carlin every couple of feet. (I love bronze as much as the next person, but Petrel is fastened with galvanized screws. Plus she's an old fishing boat and does not hold much with fancy. For which my wallet is quite grateful).

    2. Drive 1/4" galvanized lag screws from the top of the cleat into the carlin every 18" or so.

    3. Add 3/8" plywood backing panels under the portholes to tie everything together there. (They need to be thin enough that the porthole spigot will cover the plywood edge and the seam. I think 3/8" will do. Might have to go thinner - we'll see once I get the hardware off.)

    Also I am still not sure what to do about the caulking in the cleat/carlin joint. Leave it alone? Add more on top of what is there? Reef it and replace it where possible? Should I apply any sort of goop? Not 5200 or anything of the sort of course, but a less aggressive adhesive like 4200 perhaps? It's a critical seam because any water that runs down the cabin sides will pool on top of the carlin, which extends out by 1/2" or so, and will want to leak in under the staves.

    This is all new territory for me - I have no experience at all with this sort of repair - so I could be entirely off the mark with this approach. Any comments or suggestions would be more than welcome.
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  31. #136
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    I can't see any point in caulking it at all. I'd consider raking it out and then coach bolting right through the three layers, cleat, carlin and shelf to pull it all up tight in one go.
    Any caulking should be on the outside of the boat, not the inside.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  32. #137
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    I have to admit I'm having sinful thoughts about dynes and epoxy. I can't imagine any other way to make that structure waterproof short of dismantling and starting over.

  33. #138
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Nick, it's probably not clear from the photos but the carlin/cleat join is actually an exposed seam. Water can come in under the staves and cleat. So I think some sort of caulking is important there. I do like the thought of through-bolting the whole thing, and that was my first plan, but I think the carlin/shelf joint needs a larger bolt to tie it together than I can realistically run through the cleat, which is less than half the width of the carlin. Plus I have to confess that I question my ability to drill a straight enough hole... although I suppose that's only dealt with by actually doing it and learning how!

    Phil you are probably correct that this cabin is never going to be completely water tight. Rebuilding the whole thing is not an option though, for reasons that I know you know already...
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  34. #139
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Which is why glass sheathing, after strengthening as you suggest, might be a viable option.

  35. #140
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    Which is why glass sheathing, after strengthening as you suggest, might be a viable option.
    Ah, I see - I missed your point earlier. Maybe. I'm leery of sheathing any structure made of this many moving parts. But as a stop-gap until a full rebuild I could see doing it perhaps. I'm not quite ready to go there though. I'm going to fix the underlying problem first in any case.
    - Chris

    Life is short. Go boating now!

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