Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 35 of 42

Thread: Caledonia Yawl question

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Frankfort, MI
    Posts
    9,915

    Default Caledonia Yawl question

    There’s an awful lot I like about this boat, but it seems like every time I see video of one being sailed it is heeled way over, to the point where the starboard rail is practically submerged.

    What’s up with that? Is that just the way the cool kids like to do it?

    And before anyone named D____ starts barking that I should ask this upstairs—just don’t. You can think about it—but don’t do it…

    Jeff C

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Dorset, UK
    Posts
    1,446

    Default Re: Caledonia Yawl question

    Many of Iain’s boat tend towards sail and oar, which necessitates a low midship freeboard for rowing ergonomics otherwise your cartwheeling the oars inefficiently. That’s a compromise to be accepted. The issue of ‘downflooding’ when healed in gusts is always a focus, though at speed there’s a trough amidships in the wavevtrain. It’s compounded by not having side decks and narrow waterlines. Iain puts bigger rigs on, to enable very light wind sailing, however you could argue that a boat that can row should actually have a small sail area as the opposite should apply. There’sca theoretical benefit to lowering windage, but close to the surface, windage actually drops significantly.

    I’ve owned most of Iain’s designs, though not a CY, and I’d say most would be more relaxing sailers with a strake (or two) more freeboard.

    The Caledonia is really sail and motor at 6ft beam/ 5ft waterline beam and could afford more freeboard, especially as its undecked and a family boat with a biggish rig. The round bilge multistrake boat seems to have lower freeboard when healed more than the earlier multi chine version. I assume the chines lower roll speed and maybe put a but more volume in the hull atvthe overlaps. I have wondered if the earlier boat might be the better stiffer boat.

    Sat side by side with an Ilur, the CY is very dishy in shape, the ilur having defined ‘sides’ and s a harder turn to the bilge. Francois increased the freeboard of his Aber by two strakes to delay downflooding for a better seaboat and it’scappreciably more when measured and visually. It also pays off with fit out, giving a deeper boat to enable a bigger bilge where she can store her oars etc. Sitting lower on a CY may be beneficial as the boat heals though as you’re still outside the position if buoyancy, on a taller boat, sitting higher, you start to tip in and your righting affect reduces. It’s a complex blend. Looking at pictures and videos I’d say yes a multistrake CY needs another strake, the earlier chined one, no. Others would dissagree and say to reef earlier...Most decent seaboats have 4 strakes of freeboard at rest. An Ilur does, the multistrake CY has about 3. Theres alot if variability in ballast, boat weight, spar weight and how its sailed though. They’re a fabulous successfull boat, but yeah i’d say a tad more freeboard or some side decks sailing in windier regions. In the UK successfull boats need to be able to hold full sail to windward in 20 knots true/ 30 knots apparent otherwise they get sold. The other benefit of a Iains narrow waterlines is they cut through chop so nicely and float along with alot of comfort. Widen the waterline and dinghies firm up but get pushed around by waves and thump through chop...In that sense Iain’s boats are much better seaboats undeformed by racing activity of the last century. His boats are among the most beautifull, he’s one of the great yacht designers if the last century for his output, and for ‘normal’ people. Iain tends towards minimising wetted area and waterline just to the point of diminishing stability. Other designers like John Welsford designs to maximum stability just before the point of excessive wetted area or wavemaking resistance. Thats a generalisation, neither is wrong, both go along at thecsame speed. If you’re in a windy area an extea strake does no harm as you’re not rowing and is how historically people went about it.

    Its worth noting that the CY is drawn for the weight of three people to put it at design displacement. Without at least equivalent ballast the boat will be less stiff, not just due the lead but the reduction in waterline beam. In the rush to launch after a build its easily overlooked.

    You can compare freeboard at rest by looking in the table of offsets and the ‘height above DWL’ of the midship mold at the sheerline, or measure it off the lines plan.

    Oh and being fat helps sailing performance in heavier air - keeps it upright.
    Last edited by Edward Pearson; 06-19-2021 at 04:25 AM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    new zealand
    Posts
    5,103

    Default Re: Caledonia Yawl question

    The guy who bought my Pathfinder had just sold a CY. His comment was along the lines of it being a brilliant light air boat, but too easily overpowered in our decidedly not light air prevailing conditions. Several years later, he was still sailing the Pathfinder, so I guess it hadn't blotted its copybook.

    Pete

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Walney, near Cumbria UK
    Posts
    53,309

    Default Re: Caledonia Yawl question

    Does nobody consider putting in a reef?
    The Shetland models from which these designs were evolved were also sailed practically rail under. It is written that the form threw the water outwards if they did dip the rail.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
    The weakness of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    7,132

    Default Re: Caledonia Yawl question

    The cool kids hang out down here….

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Valley of the Sun
    Posts
    110,109

    Default Re: Caledonia Yawl question

    Quote Originally Posted by leikec View Post
    There’s an awful lot I like about this boat, but it seems like every time I see video of one being sailed it is heeled way over, to the point where the starboard rail is practically submerged.

    What’s up with that?
    cy sailors only sail on port tacks. . .

    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Pittsburgh
    Posts
    451

    Default Re: Caledonia Yawl question

    I built a Ness Yawl about 15 years ago, have sailed it quite a bit, and still love it. It's narrower than the CY - I've seen it described as the sports car compared to the CY pickup truck. Like the CY, the Ness Yawl is a wonderful light air boat with full sail. Since I'm often alone, I have 120 pounds of lead weights under the floorboards, which stiffens the boat up nicely (and is mentioned in the plans). Also, I put a reef in the big lug sail at about 15 knots of wind - she goes just as fast after that, but stays upright as the rig is not overpowered. There is reason Iain drew the sail with three reef points!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Frankfort, MI
    Posts
    9,915

    Default Re: Caledonia Yawl question

    Quote Originally Posted by Edward Pearson View Post

    Oh and being fat helps sailing performance in heavier air...

    I’ve got that covered!



    Oh … you’re referring to the boat…

    Jeff C

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Dorset, UK
    Posts
    1,446

    Default Re: Caledonia Yawl question

    Actually being fat helps in heavy air...big guys win heavy air races. Thin light women win light air races...

    I've got for my sins, Pathfinder, Ilur and the Caledonia Yawl (multi strake) plansets. Some questions are best not asked...well yacht designers have to eat!

    Here are the figures! Some were given, some I've had to measure off. Actually the CY freeboard is ballpark! It's worth mentioning the shape of the waterline and shape of the bilge profile (Iain and Francois use V shaped sections while John Welsford uses U shaped sections makes a difference as well as other variables like heeled waterplane, secondary stability, having crew sat on the rail.: these boats are designed for two or three people to sail. Anyway we have to start somewhere and there all 'good boats'.

    Ilur

    LOA 14'7"
    LWL 13'5"
    Beam 5'7"
    Waterline Beam 4'9"
    Depth boat amidships 2'3"
    Freeboard 20.5"
    SA sqm (lug yawl) 14
    Design displacement 422kg


    Caledonia Yawl (multi strake)

    LOA 19'6"
    LWL 16'1"
    Beam 6'4"
    Waterline beam 5'
    Depth boat amidships 2'
    Freeboard 19.4"
    SA sqm (lug yawl) 15.1
    Design displacement 495kg


    Pathfinder

    LOA 17'4"
    LWL 16'5"
    Beam 6'5"
    Waterline beam 5'6"
    Depth boat amidships 1'10"
    Freeboard 16.5" (but has side deck and coaming)
    SA sqm (sloop yawl) 15.1 sqm
    Design displacement: Not given (probably similar to two above).


    Stand out...

    1. Ilur only has an inch more freeboard than a Caledonia. Both of these have more freeboard than a Pathfinder, which can be lower due to it's side decks and coaming. The Ilur also has more depth below the waterline (2 inches) so the whole boat is 3 inches taller. Les than I thought. Although it's the 'smallest' it's 'height' gives it volume.

    2. A Pathfinder and CY have the same beam but the Pathfinder has a half a foot more waterline beam. This will give it more primary stability at the expense of more wetted area and wave making resistance over the CY. It has stiffer bilge sections as well as a U shaped sectional area. Pathfinder has a bit more waterline length as well so it's waterline plane area will be larger (at the expense of wetted area). It's likely the 'stiffest' boat off the three in gusts with higher primary stability. The CY waterline will get a bit longer as it heels though due to the longe ends. In light air to moderate conditions the CY has a lower resistance lower drag hull than Pathfinder and should be quicker. Ultimately stiffness comes as it heals and it has more freeboard than Pathfinder to help compensate for a lack of side decks and coaming.

    3. Ilur has about the same SA as the other two, but less waterline beam and length. It will have less stability but the greater freeboard (not by much) improves it's downflooding angle. It has less wetted area than the other two and will be fastest in light air. The other two have more waterline length and can attain higher top speeds in windier conditions when all are approaching their displacement 'hull speeds' (that's more variable than typically predicted due to the light weight for the length of many plywood boats in use). There's going to be a difference between a 13ft and a 16ft waterline boat assuming no planing.
    Last edited by Edward Pearson; 06-19-2021 at 12:37 PM.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Salt Lake City, Utah
    Posts
    157

    Default Re: Caledonia Yawl question

    Quote Originally Posted by Garth Jones View Post
    I built a Ness Yawl about 15 years ago, have sailed it quite a bit, and still love it. It's narrower than the CY - I've seen it described as the sports car compared to the CY pickup truck. Like the CY, the Ness Yawl is a wonderful light air boat with full sail. Since I'm often alone, I have 120 pounds of lead weights under the floorboards, which stiffens the boat up nicely (and is mentioned in the plans). Also, I put a reef in the big lug sail at about 15 knots of wind - she goes just as fast after that, but stays upright as the rig is not overpowered. There is reason Iain drew the sail with three reef points!

    I have a Caledonia Yawl with the balanced lug and mizzen sail plan. I built this boat with the open cockpit floor plan. I agree with Garth that Iain's designs do very well in light air. My CY has a generous main sail area that I reduce to one reef at 10-15 knots.

    I sail in high elevation mountain reservoirs which has taught me to respect dynamic and potentially strong gusty wind conditions. I find that my CY sails very well with excellent stability, especially with one reef. I actually think it also points better when reefed. I have never felt that it needs more freeboard.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Norwich,United Kingdom
    Posts
    8,288

    Default Re: Caledonia Yawl question

    I haven't set foot in a CY but my feeling is that they are quite a buoyant design and never get to carry enough of a load to really stand up to the generous sail plan.Perhaps three good sized adults on the windward rail would move things up a gear,but all too often I see images here and elsewhere of such boats being sailed by people who haven't got enough of a hard driving background in small boats and consequently sit on the bottom boards or thwarts and consequently don't extract all the performance to be had.A decent tiller extension would probably help and at least they haven't got a transom to drag.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    northwestern Wisconsin
    Posts
    10,246

    Default Re: Caledonia Yawl question

    Quote Originally Posted by John Meachen View Post
    I haven't set foot in a CY but my feeling is that they are quite a buoyant design and never get to carry enough of a load to really stand up to the generous sail plan.Perhaps three good sized adults on the windward rail would move things up a gear,but all too often I see images here and elsewhere of such boats being sailed by people who haven't got enough of a hard driving background in small boats and consequently sit on the bottom boards or thwarts and consequently don't extract all the performance to be had.A decent tiller extension would probably help and at least they haven't got a transom to drag.
    Well, now, that kind of depends on the kind of performance you're after, doesn't it?

    Not everyone is in the "hard driving" camp. "Performance" for someone like me, for instance, means a heck of a lot more than fastest around the buoys.

    I'd rather reef than hike out, mostly. For multi-week trips (more the CY's gig, anyway), the ability to sit inside and comfy IS "performance."

    Tom
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    www.tompamperin.com

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Norwich,United Kingdom
    Posts
    8,288

    Default Re: Caledonia Yawl question

    So how do you know just how much your boat can do?Perhaps carrying a vast load of gear for an expedition does weigh down a boat enough to give it some bearing.On the other hand,you might equate it to driving a car around in second gear because nobody showed where the other gears were located.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    northwestern Wisconsin
    Posts
    10,246

    Default Re: Caledonia Yawl question

    Quote Originally Posted by John Meachen View Post
    So how do you know just how much your boat can do?Perhaps carrying a vast load of gear for an expedition does weigh down a boat enough to give it some bearing.On the other hand,you might equate it to driving a car around in second gear because nobody showed where the other gears were located.
    More accurate analogy:

    You might equate it to driving around in second gear because you're crossing a parking lot and third gear is completely irrelevant.

    Or, to reverse your analogy, you might equate the "performance = speed" mentality with deciding that a Ferrari two-seater would be a better choice for hauling a couch from the store to your apartment than a beat-up old pickup that can only manage 40 mph.

    If your goal is low-speed cruising, "performance" is not synonymous with "speed." Comfort, and the ability to keep moving at a moderate speed at moderate efforts, for long days at the tiller (or the oars, for that matter), is a better definition of "performance" for my purposes. Reefing down is consistent with those goals. Hiking out, not so much--not that you can/should never hike. But a better boat in that context is one where you don't have to.

    Nothing wrong with hiking out and pushing hard. But it's a bit simplistic to define that as "performance" if you ask me. (Which, of course, you didn't!)

    Tom
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    www.tompamperin.com

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Valley of the Sun
    Posts
    110,109

    Default Re: Caledonia Yawl question

    anybody know where to find 'voyage of the aegre'?
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Salt Lake City, Utah
    Posts
    157

    Default Re: Caledonia Yawl question

    Paul, I thought I had a link to this a while ago but seems to be dead now...

    John, I think I get and understand what you are referring to with the second gear analogy. I currently drive in my every day life in a slightly lower gear these days. I used to push the edge when I was younger, more agile and as my wife will gladly voice a propensity to reckless behavior, which fortunately up to this point has caused no major harm.

    The point is that for sedentary (my case) sailing, the Caledonia Yawl works for me, my family and friends. I set the second reef early and I don't scare anyone.

    If you really want high performance, modern hull design (not this classic displacement hull), there are lots of great choices. I web lust over the B&B Core Sound 17' and 20' boats which are true high performance planing hulls.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Frankfort, MI
    Posts
    9,915

    Default Re: Caledonia Yawl question

    I don’t mind hiking out to get the best possible performance out of a boat if the hiking straps are made by La-Z-Boy and have a built in recliner, footrest, and cup holder.

    Building or buying a perfectly good boat and then sitting on the outside of the hull looking in seems to be a waste of a perfectly watertight bit of craftsmanship. If I’m looking for non-stop high drama, dizzingly high moments of adrenaline, and horrifyingly scary near-death-ball-shrinking hours of agony I can easily drive down to the local A&W with a Biden for President sign in my car window, or date my cousin’s best friend…

    Jeff C

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Valley of the Sun
    Posts
    110,109

    Default Re: Caledonia Yawl question

    ^ sometimes you hike out for the view
    sometimes you hike out to stretch your legs
    sometimes sitting in the boat sucks
    sometimes you hike out to feel the wind

    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Frankfort, MI
    Posts
    9,915

    Default Re: Caledonia Yawl question

    I’ve got wind that hasn’t even been felt yet…

    Jeff C

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    n.c. tn
    Posts
    9,059

    Default Re: Caledonia Yawl question

    thanks for asking the question..

    and muchas gracias for the informed responses!

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Frankfort, MI
    Posts
    9,915

    Default Re: Caledonia Yawl question

    Quote Originally Posted by Durnik View Post
    thanks for asking the question..

    and muchas gracias for the informed responses!
    No problem! A little boat stuff in the bilge now and again won’t hurt, IMO.

    Jeff C

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    northwestern Wisconsin
    Posts
    10,246

    Default Re: Caledonia Yawl question

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Pless View Post
    ^ sometimes you hike out for the view
    sometimes you hike out to stretch your legs
    sometimes sitting in the boat sucks
    sometimes you hike out to feel the wind

    And sometimes, if your boat is a skinny sail-and-oar design, you don't hike out because if you do, you'll capsize to windward...

    Tom
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    www.tompamperin.com

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Norwich,United Kingdom
    Posts
    8,288

    Default Re: Caledonia Yawl question

    Quote Originally Posted by WI-Tom View Post
    And sometimes, if your boat is a skinny sail-and-oar design, you don't hike out because if you do, you'll capsize to windward...

    Tom
    You won't do that too often before learning when not to do it.Just to be clear,I don't expect too many casual sailors to do this sort of thing.



    It would bring about a fair bit more performance if they tried something like this.



    Then maybe gravitated to something like this.



    It may be that age,physical decrepitude or distaste prevent too much physical input.It does move the boat along but some of the justifications for not doing so remind me of the comments on woodworking forums when somebody suggests using hand tools instead of those with a switch.

    I have a distinct memory of a boat test of the CY back in the late 90's where the tester clearly stated that a bit of weight up to windward was pretty necessary and all it takes is a tiller extension and a willingness to park the posterior there.

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    northwestern Wisconsin
    Posts
    10,246

    Default Re: Caledonia Yawl question

    Quote Originally Posted by John Meachen View Post
    That doesn't interest me at all, really. It looks quite unpleasant. But if racing around at speed is your thing, and you're fit enough, I can see why it would seem like the thing to do.

    Quote Originally Posted by John Meachen View Post
    It would bring about a fair bit more performance if they tried something like this.

    A couple of thoughts:

    1. You seem to be sticking with the idea that "speed" and "performance" are synonymous. I disagree completely with that notion. I realize my kind of sailing (small engineless open boats on multi-day or even multi-week cruising trips in remote or semi-remote areas, where 30-40% of my miles might come under oars) is a vanishingly small niche in the wide world of sailing. But for my kind of sailing, "performance" means different things entirely, including:

    -The ability to carry enough gear, and provide a space to sleep aboard when necessary.
    -The ability to be righted from a capsize singlehanded, and sailed or rowed away safely.
    -A variety of comfortable seating positions for long high-mileage days, without the need to hike out (e.g. simple reefing system).
    -Ability to make the necessary miles to the next anchorage without an engine, whether there's wind or not.
    -Reliance on simple inexpensive systems, minimal hardware, and fast transitions between rowing and sailing.

    Unless I missed seeing it, it seems like none of the boats you pictured have reef points in their sails. That alone makes them "low performance" boats for my purposes.

    2. Will sitting on the side decks as in the photo above bring more speed? Sure. In some conditions. But if you can keep the boat flat under full sail while sailing in the cockpit (as has been my experience in Ross Lillistone's Phoenix III design, for example), then what's the benefit to sitting on the side deck? Or the need? That's probably a function of different uses again, since I'm almost always sailing a fairly heavily loaded boat.

    3. Heeling is scary for non-sailors. If my goal is to have my wife accompany me and enjoy it enough so that she might do so again, then reefing down provides better "performance" for my purposes.


    Quote Originally Posted by John Meachen View Post
    Then maybe gravitated to something like this.

    If I have to get to windward in a good breeze in my boat, I'm perfectly willing to do that kind of thing. And I do. So I think I'm largely in agreement with you--there may be many sailors out there who don't know the value of using body weight this way. Then again, if speed is the goal, rowing directly to windward will bring much more "performance" (in my boat, anyway) by your definition, unless it is very very windy indeed. At which point, I'll likely be tucked in somewhere sheltered.

    Quote Originally Posted by John Meachen View Post
    It may be that age,physical decrepitude or distaste prevent too much physical input.It does move the boat along but some of the justifications for not doing so remind me of the comments on woodworking forums when somebody suggests using hand tools instead of those with a switch.
    Or again, it may be that what you view as "performance" is irrelevant to some, who thus feel no need to hike out. Are you racing around a track, or out for a Sunday drive? Taking a trip with a motor home, or on a motorcycle, or on foot with a backpack?

    Purpose, more than anything, defines "performance" to me.

    Quote Originally Posted by John Meachen View Post
    I have a distinct memory of a boat test of the CY back in the late 90's where the tester clearly stated that a bit of weight up to windward was pretty necessary and all it takes is a tiller extension and a willingness to park the posterior there.
    Yep. I suspect a lot of people who come late to sailing, with little or no formal instruction, and no racing background, just don't know how important trim and body weight are in dinghy sailing.

    Tom
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    www.tompamperin.com

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Frankfort, MI
    Posts
    9,915

    Default Re: Caledonia Yawl question

    Heeling isn’t so bad. Heeling to the point where the rail is a 1/4” above the water on Lake Michigan when the guy in the boat has limited use of his legs is scary.

    But given that, it sounds like the boat has decent freeboard when set up properly, loaded correctly, and sailed intelligently. That makes sense, and my leg issues come with a certain amount of risk in many situations, so under the right circumstances I can deal, because getting out on the water is much more fun than daytime tv.

    Jeff C

  26. #26
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Valley of the Sun
    Posts
    110,109

    Default Re: Caledonia Yawl question

    a wide variety of decked and buoyancy chamber strategies exist for otherwise small open boats such as the cy

    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  27. #27
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Frankfort, MI
    Posts
    9,915

    Default Re: Caledonia Yawl question

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Pless View Post
    a wide variety of decked and buoyancy chamber strategies exist for otherwise small open boats such as the cy

    Excellent point!

    Although I’m still a little mad that you didn’t make any attempt to run with my wind joke earlier…



    Jeff C

  28. #28
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Valley of the Sun
    Posts
    110,109

    Default Re: Caledonia Yawl question

    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  29. #29
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Dorset, UK
    Posts
    1,446

    Default Re: Caledonia Yawl question

    Quote Originally Posted by leikec View Post
    Heeling isn’t so bad. Heeling to the point where the rail is a 1/4” above the water on Lake Michigan when the guy in the boat has limited use of his legs is scary.

    But given that, it sounds like the boat has decent freeboard when set up properly, loaded correctly, and sailed intelligently. That makes sense, and my leg issues come with a certain amount of risk in many situations, so under the right circumstances I can deal, because getting out on the water is much more fun than daytime tv.

    Jeff C
    Jeff, I'd take a good look at the John Marples Sea Clipper series. You sit in, face forward in a comfortable seat all lines led to you. Being a trimaran it'll be very safe provided you don't over press it and you'll be able to enjoy all that speed. Folds up. Beach cat rig. If you can keep one close to the water rigged, it might work well for you. The 10 is probabably a laugh a minute in a river, the 16 a good length for out in the bay. The 20 would have some legs but more boat. For 2, that 16 looks a peach. No moving around if you've got some leg trouble. You steer'em with lines to foot pedals though, you could rig that to hands if you needed to.

    Last edited by Edward Pearson; 06-21-2021 at 05:42 AM.

  30. #30
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Dorset, UK
    Posts
    1,446

    Default Re: Caledonia Yawl question

    If the 16 looks too much boat, here's some action video of the 10. The mast bends before it gets too over pressed (skinny top section)...They look alot of fun. Started building a 10 for dad when he wasn't well, but he deteriorated too quick. They're super easy to build. Marples plans are very detailed.

    Last edited by Edward Pearson; 06-21-2021 at 05:34 AM.

  31. #31
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Location
    Barrie, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    6,331

    Default Re: Caledonia Yawl question

    Hiking out depends on a steady reliable wind. In the waters where I sail small boats the winds are always fluky, gusty, and changing.

    As a teenager I dumped to windward plenty of times, hiked well out when the wind suddenly died. No big deal of course if you're just playing, but quite different in a sail-and-oar camping cruiser where to be dumped is a very big deal.

    As for reefing, YES! On Lake Huron I'd say half the sailboat crews don't know how to reef except theoretically. On the 20 kt days they fly just the genoa, thinking they are reefed. (!) They get away with this because of the very tough construction of modern sails, and the steering authority of a fin-keel/spade-rudder design. But it's not balanced, or a boat sailing in harmony with its conditions.

    I reef very frequently. In fact when sailing solo on Drake (40 ft ketch), it has to be a pretty light-air day when I don't start with one reef in the main.

    Of course the fact that the spars are 75 years old has nothing to do with it
    Last edited by Dave Hadfield; 06-21-2021 at 02:14 PM.

  32. #32
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Salt Lake City, Utah
    Posts
    157

    Default Re: Caledonia Yawl question

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Hadfield View Post

    But it's not balanced, or a boat sailing in harmony with its conditions.

    Well said. I try to visualize the center of effort on my sails. I may not get it right but I try get that balanced feel and easy weather helm. I have really come to like having a Mizzen.

  33. #33
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Location
    Richmond, VA
    Posts
    1,079

    Default Re: Caledonia Yawl question

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Hadfield View Post
    Drake
    Thanks for the reminder. Drake was what originally hooked me on the WBF.

  34. #34
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    Portland, Maine
    Posts
    21,216

    Default Re: Caledonia Yawl question

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Pless View Post
    anybody know where to find 'voyage of the aegre'?
    That’s a blast from the past! Wasn’t the CY he built later called Crazybird?

  35. #35
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Montana, USA
    Posts
    206

    Default Re: Caledonia Yawl question

    Yes "Voyage of the Aegre" was a great adventure tale by Nick Grainger, who owned but did not build the CY Crazybird and sailed and raced her in Australia. Nick established the Caledonia Yawl forum website and posted the tale of Aegre there. I wish he would have written a book because it is a great tale. But then he went off to get his PhD and did another great adventure "The Albatross Voyage" with John Ridgeway et al to highlight the plight of the albatross. Worth the google search if you have not read it. Nick handed the website off to Mike Duncan who ran it until about 2014. There was a great deal of information there. I hope Nick and Mike are well. I miss the CY forum.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •