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Thread: December 25 1776

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 1999
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    Default December 25 1776

    The coming weather is similar to what Washington and soldiers endured that historic day for our country.

    https://allthingsliberty.com/2020/12...id-they-cross/

    Stay safe but have some fun.

    JD
    Senior Ole Salt # 650

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
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    1,639

    Default Re: December 25 1776

    Given all the modern inventions that we typically take for granted, it's simply mindboggling when presented such detail of an epic event, and the incredibly hard-working and courageous people who have given us so much! Thank you!

  3. #3
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    Default Re: December 25 1776

    Just a part of the history.

    An intriguing question is just how difficult was the crossing. With no intention of disparaging the heroic efforts of the boat crews and realizing the icy conditions they faced, this might not have been a particularly arduous task for these experienced mariners and fishermen who regularly plied the stormy Atlantic. This crossing was about one-fifth the length of the earlier East River crossing, also made under difficult weather conditions.
    What of the commander-in-chief, after landing in Jersey? According to a suspect “Diary of an Officer on Washington’s Staff,” he stood on the bank wrapped in his cloak supervising the landings. Another account says that he sat on an old beehive, but staff on the New Jersey side can find no such documentation.[41] As the hours passed and the crossing fell behind schedule, he contemplated cancelling the entire operation, but decided, “As I was certain there was no making a Retreat without being discovered, and harassed on repassing the River, I determined to push on at all Events.”[42] He need not have worried. Again Greenwood, “The noise of the soldiers coming over and clearing away the ice, the rattle of the cannon wheels on the frozen ground, and the cheerfulness of my fellow-comrades encouraged me beyond expression, and, big coward as I acknowledge myself to be, I felt great pleasure.”[43] By 4 a.m., with a small rear guard likely remaining at the river to protect the boats, the troops were on the march to Trenton. It is possible that the 260 men of the 6th Battalion of Connecticut State troops under Col. John Chester of Sargent’s Brigade filled this role. They did not march to Trenton. Washington would certainly never leave the critical boats and landing site without protection, for even a small enemy raiding party could have easily torched any unguarded boats.
    “Victory or Death!” Dr. Benjamin Rush observed Washington writing this on a scrap of paper before the crossing.[44] With that as the watchword for the night, and after marching the ten miles to Trenton, the army would ultimately capture over 900 Hessians and then re-cross the Delaware using those same boats. The return trip was supposedly more difficult.
    At a dinner after Yorktown, Lord Cornwallis toasted Washington with, “When the illustrious part that your Excellency has borne in this long and arduous contest becomes a matter of history, fame will gather your brightest laurels rather from the banks of the Delaware than from those of the Chesapeake.”[45] Certainly well spoken.


    [1]David Hackett Fischer, Washington’s Crossing (New York: Oxford University Press, 2004), 398.
    Senior Ole Salt # 650

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