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Thread: A bit of fill and antifoul will sort it out.

  1. #246
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    Default Re: A bit of fill and antifoul will sort it out.

    You are making a lot of progress - excellent!
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  2. #247
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    Default Re: A bit of fill and antifoul will sort it out.

    Thanks, my plans changed due to the weather we had a few days ago, but it just meant I focused on the engine prep rather than getting the hull ready to go back into the water.
    Today I installed the hardwood wedges under the front engine mounts.
    I got the shaft alignment to the point where the two flanges would slide together easily as they are not flat. Both have a 5 mm step. one female, and one male that slides into the other.
    This told me that I was well within the ballpark. I then drilled through the rubber mounts into the wedges and the engine beds for 10mm bolts.
    I then glued them down and bolted up, checking the alignment at intervals to make sure I wasn't drifting away from the target.

    [IMG]

    [IMG]

    The second photo also shows tomorrows challenge.
    The exhaust is pointing almost directly at the rear engine mount.
    I'm going to first see if a tight hose elbow will get under it, but that is probably not the best solution.

  3. #248
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    Default Re: A bit of fill and antifoul will sort it out.

    I can't remember if this thread has already covered it,but its normally considered a good idea to launch with the shaft coupling disconnected and re-do the alignment with the boat afloat.

  4. #249
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    Default Re: A bit of fill and antifoul will sort it out.

    Huh. If the engine's been moved I always realign after a few days in the water & mast/rigging installed, I've never launched with the coupling disconnected. Will some boats move that much? I've never had it off by more than 0.015" when I've rechecked it.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  5. #250
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    Default Re: A bit of fill and antifoul will sort it out.

    Its quite common here to launch and then align/connect the coupling.Not universal and it depends on the size and strength of the boat and the shaft length.There is no better way to have the hull supported than by water after all and it only takes a little while.

  6. #251
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    Default Re: A bit of fill and antifoul will sort it out.

    Quote Originally Posted by John Meachen View Post
    Its quite common here to launch and then align/connect the coupling.Not universal and it depends on the size and strength of the boat and the shaft length.There is no better way to have the hull supported than by water after all and it only takes a little while.
    For sure! I always align after the boat has launched, taken up for a few days & had the rig installed & tensioned. I've always hooked the shaft up before launch as 1) I can use it in case of emergency, 2) it's the easiest way to keep the prop from sliding back into the rudder, & 3) it doesn't put odd angles/pressure on the stuffing box.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  7. #252
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    Default Re: A bit of fill and antifoul will sort it out.

    I will check the alignment again once I'm back on my mooring, but will need to use the engine to get at least some of the way there.
    Today I finally got the exhaust elbow in place.
    Yesterday I quickly decided to remove the exhaust elbow and build a spacer to push it back in the boat and lift the end of it.
    Two of the nuts holding it on took a couple of hours to coax off using a cold chisel and hammer to slowly turn them as they had been damaged during installation by someone.
    I took some measurements and made the spacer from bits of steel laying around the boat yard and my garage.
    Christmas in NZ has a long tail, so businesses are still closed while staff lay about on beaches and fix their yachts, so I was on my own.

    I cut, ground, drilled, welded, ground some more, then more welding. Finally a coat of heat resistant paint at about 7.30 last night!
    This morning I took it to the boat with some trepidation.
    It didn't quite fit, I think because I was trying to locate it in mid air with the measurements I'd taken.
    Rather than starting again, which was going to be hard as the raw materials were going to have to be scavenged again!
    I decided to put a "dart" in the pipe. My wife sews, so her word.
    I cut 15mm out of the top to tilt the elbow back a bit more and rewelded it. Being a pipe weld rather that flanges it went much easier with no rework.

    The final product is serviceable and fits perfectly!

    [IMG]

    [IMG]

    Remarkably the piece of hose to the wetbox is long enough so can be reused, as it was replaced a year ago.
    I then got started hooking up the wiring for the starter and alternator.

  8. #253
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    Default Re: A bit of fill and antifoul will sort it out.

    I got the right sized hose clamp, so the exhaust is buttoned up.
    I also got a longer throttle cable, so that got installed as well.
    The Morse control pushes the cable for throttle "on", but the engine was set up to "pull" on. Damn!
    I managed to re-engineer the cable holder across the top of the engine with a hammer, vice and a disk cutter, and drill a new hole in the butterfly actuator so it now works.
    The "too short" throttle cable that was only 2 years old got repurposed for the gear linkage, so that is now smoother with less effort, so a double win!
    I replaced the rotten diesel return line, and hooked the diesel supply up for both tanks with valves to switch. A much tidier install than before.
    I feel like things are starting to speed up now with smaller obstacles to sort out.

  9. #254
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    Default Re: A bit of fill and antifoul will sort it out.

    Today I finished the wiring, and started on the coolers.
    I got the oil cooler and remote filter installed and measured how much hose I need to connect them up.

    [IMG]
    This photo also shows the fuel supply I installed with valves to the 2 tanks. The return lines and valves can just be seen down the back of the engine. I can now see the end of the road for this, with a start up imminent.

    One of my mates had a terrible experience returning from the South Island a couple of days ago.
    Sailing on a beam reach at 10 knots along the south coast of Wellington, he hit Thom's rock which is a notorious boat wrecker. It is awash, flat topped and the size of a van. The keel bounced him up in the air, landing again on the rudder. This bent and tore a small hole in the fibreglass hull. He got towed out of danger within 30 minutes by a fisherman, then towed back to the boatyard for liftout. 3 hours of bailing for 3 people kept it afloat, but the damage is expensive looking.
    Keel joint is damaged, but no internal damage has been found yet.
    Rudder will need new shaft, and rebuilt skin fittings.
    He was aware of it and was checking his location on the chart, but just got it wrong.

  10. #255
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    Default Re: A bit of fill and antifoul will sort it out.

    So today I got the final couple of hoses connected. The "radiator" hoses were the tricky ones. They are 32mm approx and needed to take a few bends. I bought random hoses of the correct size, bends and length knowing that I would need to join them somewhere to get the path.
    I used some 35mm 316L pipe that I had from another project as the joiners.
    Sorry no photo's.
    I then tidied up some wiring that had to move for the heat exchanger, and filled the fluids.
    7 litres of engine oil, 2 and a bit of transmission fluid and straight water for the engine cooling.
    I wasn't wanting to waste coolant in case I needed to dump it for any reason. A final flush isn't a bad idea anyway.
    After a bit of injector pump bleeding it fired up and ran nicely.
    There were a few water hoses that needed a tighten, but nothing dramatic.
    Oil pressure was 50psi, and temperature sat at 85 Deg C.
    I need a new gearbox oil pressure sender, but it's been wonky for a while.
    I still need to check the transmission fluid again. I've checked it a few times, but still keeping an eye on it as it needs to be checked as soon as the engine is stopped to get the level. I'll probably have a look with it running as well just for interest.
    Mostly feeling relief at this stage.

  11. #256
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    Default Re: A bit of fill and antifoul will sort it out.

    I thought I should show a photo of the engine with all the hoses attached. It's a bit of a maze in there now.
    The clear hose is going to get replaced as it is a little large for the heat exchanger end, so needs to be more rubber than plastic. I like the clear hose as it shows flow, so I will install it from the strainer to the engine inlet.



    This morning when I got to the boat I noticed transmission fluid in the tray. Heart sank, but it turned out to be the output shaft seal which can be replaced in situ as I have good access to the back of the gearbox. I can sort that out when I get back onto the mooring. I bought some oil mats for the bottom of the tray.
    I've been getting ready to go back into the water, so put another coat of epoxy primer on the keel and gave it 2 coats of antifoul over the last 2 days.


    It's gusting up to 70 knots at the moment and will be windy until the weekend now, so I can concentrate on some tidying up jobs.
    I also need to go up the mast and reinstall the wind indicator that blew off last night. It's probably broken somehow, but I need to check.
    I got the new rear panel of the cabin cut out, Everdured and installed yesterday also, and reinstalled the door so I am weathertight again.
    Sanding and painting of these is in my future.

  12. #257
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    Wongawallan Oz
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    Default Re: A bit of fill and antifoul will sort it out.

    You’ve done an amazing job on that engine, well done. I didn’t go back and check to see if you’d already mentioned it but was there much difference in weight all up?

    The boat’s looking great. Good luck with the launch - I hope you get some decent weather but you may have ours heading your way - lots of rain......
    Larks

    “It’s impossible”, said pride.
    “It’s risky”, said experience.
    “It’s pointless”, said reason.
    “Give it a try”, whispered the heart.

    LPBC Beneficiary

    "Keep away from people who try to belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you, too, can become great!"

  13. #258
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    Default Re: A bit of fill and antifoul will sort it out.

    I couldn't find any data on the weight of either engine, but the new engine has an aluminium bell housing to start with.
    The Ford bellhousing was 10mm plate steel so at least 50kg there to start with. I was grunting lifting the adaptor plate for the gearbox.
    I was talking to an engine reconditioner, who said that he just finished another Ford. He could only just lift the flywheel!
    I've estimated probably 100 - 150 lighter, and I'm expecting to be a bit bow down now, so will have to move things around a bit to compensate.
    Monday is Wellington Anniversary day, there is a race planned and the weather is looking good so I'm targeting that.

  14. #259
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    Default Re: A bit of fill and antifoul will sort it out.

    I'm back on the mooring now, after launching on Monday. We missed the race start but that wasn't the key part of the day.
    Engine ran fine, shaft alignment is good.
    I'll get an boat mechanic to check it and change the shaft seal on the back of the gearbox.
    I checked the electrics with a Silver electrode in the water.
    The voltages are within the acceptable range, but I need to sort out the engine earth.
    With the engine running the voltage rises to -600mv, which the manual that came with the electrode says is the engine earthing.
    The starter is a bit sluggish too, so I will start there.
    It is great to see 50 amps from the alternator after starting, which bodes well for cold beer over the summer.
    We sailed back to the mooring in 20 knots on the nose, so had a great shakedown after a longish break between sails.

  15. #260
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    Default Re: A bit of fill and antifoul will sort it out.

    Impressive work Slacko, I admire your equanimity.
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  16. #261
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    Default Re: A bit of fill and antifoul will sort it out.

    You can't change the situation I guess, just keep the goal in mind.
    I sorted out the voltage leakage when the engine was running by removing the cable from the engine to the battery negative and re-crimping both ends with the next size down crimper jaws. Not full crimp, but a good squeeze. The potential voltage now sits at -975mV batteries off, batteries on and engine running so I'm happy to move on from that job.
    I got a pressure gauge fitted to the gearbox, and it sits around 140-150 Psi which is with in spec for the gearbox.
    I'm now working on construction of the engine box and battery box for the house batteries.
    The battery box I have needs mods to allow the engine box to work, so I'm starting from scratch again. As I'm writing this I realised that the old box can supply the 200 x 20 planking required for the new one and is probably Kauri.
    Waitangi Day tomorrow (National NZ Day), so a sail and BBQ at the boatshed is planned.
    Last edited by Slacko; 02-05-2021 at 01:20 AM.

  17. #262
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    Default Re: A bit of fill and antifoul will sort it out.

    This afternoon I started construction of the engine box.
    I needed to remove the house battery box to attach that piece of timber underneath the oil cooler to the engine beds.
    I'll then build the box up from there.
    The new battery box needed to move sideways a little to make space.
    Oops, I got carried away and trashed out the berth down that side completely!

    [IMG]

    There is lots of untapped real estate back there.


    There is another 4 feet back to that ringframe from the end of the berth.
    I'm going to put ply all the way back so I can get my headsails down there easily.
    I can see some sanding and painting in my immediate future, before construction.

  18. #263
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    Default Re: A bit of fill and antifoul will sort it out.

    I was just listening to a news report about Putin's Palace. (vlad that is).
    If you've found the space how about a 'Hooker room', with a hydraulic pop up pole dance pole?

    I don't know what any of that means, but .... if you have space....?
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  19. #264
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    Default Re: A bit of fill and antifoul will sort it out.

    The bilge down the starboard side now has one topcoat on it and is looking glossy.
    I've noticed in use that the engine was losing water out of the cooling circuit.
    I found a couple of small leaks, but there was still water loss.
    The radiator cap wasn't bubbling when running, and there is no water in the oil so I was thinking it could be the water cooled exhaust manifold rather than head gasket.
    I pressure tested the circuit, but I couldn't isolate the manifold from the engine, but it did prove there was a leak.
    I bit the bullet and took the manifold off for testing at home.
    I sealed it up, pressurised the jacket, and dumped it in a rubbish bin full of water. Sure enough it bubbles away happily.
    So, the engine is likely to be ok, but I now need to get a manifold from somewhere.
    I spoke to the suppliers of the engine, who had stopped marinising these engines 10 years ago because of this issue are looking into being able to weld one up, but I've followed some other paths.
    Savage marine, who I got the heat exchanger from don't make a manifold for this engine, but put me onto another supplier who has quoted me for one at $1500 plus GST.
    It will be hot dip galvanised, so better than the unit I have now.
    Using coolant will help protect it, so I'm committed really.

  20. #265
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    Default Re: A bit of fill and antifoul will sort it out.

    I got the second coat on the starboard side quarter berth bilge area this afternoon.



    I'll get the paint on the hull above the second stringer once I've got the berth built.
    It will be a whole lot easier to reach than it is now, and I'll sand and prep under the deck, and paint that at the same time.
    Those crossways timber will need some mods to suit the base framing, so that will all get painted once built.

  21. #266
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    Default Re: A bit of fill and antifoul will sort it out.

    I fitted the new battery box and hooked up the house batteries that live in it.
    I still need to make a lid for the box, but need to get the height of the berth and size of the hole sorted.
    The battery wiring needs a tidy up too, but once everything is settled I'll sort that too.

    Then I started building the structure of the quarter berth. It's amazing how far out my naturally pretty good eye for level is when you get up into that curved space.
    I'm using a 2 metre long level to pick up the locations of the timbers.
    Berths, benches and tables are the only things that need to be "level" in a boat. Just moving around in the boat moves the bubble, so it is a bit of a guesstimate.


  22. #267
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    Default Re: A bit of fill and antifoul will sort it out.

    Looking good!

    Don't forget that for battery longevity, cables from each battery (unless in series) should be the same length - IOW if battery #1 needs 1 meter cables, battery #2 - even if 1/2 meter would work, should have 1 meter cables as well. This ensures that they get drawn down & charged equally.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  23. #268
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    Default Re: A bit of fill and antifoul will sort it out.

    That makes sense Garret, as they will have different resistance.
    So I should put plus and minus posts remote from the batteries and run same length cables to them.
    As I have them wired now the rear one is piggybacked off the closest one, with woefully inadequate cables.

  24. #269
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    Default Re: A bit of fill and antifoul will sort it out.

    The framing of the quarter berth is finished, so the next job was to make the plywood lids for over the top.
    I had a sheet of 3 mm MDF for making patterns, so converted a paint stirrer into a tick stick and got to it.
    In the past I have converted from the tick stick straight to the final plywood leaving no room for error.



    Most of the cutting was done with a handsaw, but a craft knife could also be used for trimming in place.
    I used tape to add bits back I had got wrong.
    The pattern showing is for the furthest up under the deck where it got tricky!



    I managed to make the patterns fit the piece of 9mm Okuume ply that I at home, so they are now cut out, sanded and on the boat for final tweaking.
    They already look great, but I didn't get a photo as it was getting a bit dark.

  25. #270
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    Default Re: A bit of fill and antifoul will sort it out.

    I ended up cutting the last piece up under the cockpit in half as it couldn't be installed after some vertical pieces were installed for the sides to stop stuff going under the cockpit floor.
    Much easier to manage and I will get those engine controls through a hole between the two pieces as well.




    I spent the weekend painting everything, with one side only requiring a final topcoat and the berth support structure in the boat primed.


    This shot is the first coat of primer.

  26. #271
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    Default Re: A bit of fill and antifoul will sort it out.

    The replacement manifold finally arrived during the week.

    It's chunky, and fairly industrial looking, but looks like it will do the job.
    I've got some replacement studs/nuts and a gasket so I'm ready to install over the weekend hopefully.
    It has threaded fittings for the water jacket which is good. I can use elbows to allow me to route the connections where they need to go.

    I've shaped some 50 x 10 mm cedar planks to close in the gap from the new berth to under the cockpit. I'll fit them with an air gap to allow ventilation.
    A lid for the battery box is in progress too.

  27. #272
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    Default Re: A bit of fill and antifoul will sort it out.

    I got a few hours in over the weekend.
    Saturday I found that the flange holes (there are only 3) didn't line up with the studs on the head.
    A hour with a rat tail file solved that problem.
    I realised at this point why the manufacturer dropped the price by $100 from original quote.

    The other 4 engine studs are holding both the inlet and exhaust manifolds on.
    They have heavy washers (5mm thick) to bridge the gaps between the two.
    After smearing the faces and gasket in exhaust sealant ready to fit I found that 2 of these washers needed one side cut away to fit, so I cleaned all the goop off again and took it all home for some adjustments to the welds around the flanges and the washers.
    Today I ground a bit off some of the welding to allow the washers to fit, and shaved flats on the side of the washers.
    With a bit of contortionism and blind nut tightening I got to this point this afternoon.


    The coolant fittings ended up sitting really well, but I was thankful to get 70% off retail for those 316L pipe fittings!!
    I was watching the little pile on the counter getting real expensive at Anzor.

    All the hoses are connected, so I just have to fill with coolant and fit a new piece of Exhaust hose at $80/metre ( It needs to be 30 mm longer) and I'm ready to fire it up again.


    The gear linkage also needs to be connected if I want motion.

    I'm also making the lid for the house battery box too.
    I wasn't quite sure how deep the lid needed to be so I made it generous, then measured in place.
    It needed 15 mm removed, so I got brave and fed it through the thicknesser with a fine cut to start.

    Apparently this is OK, so that saved a bit of elbow grease with the 4 1/2 Stanley!
    The plywood top is sitting on the saw bench ready to be fitted on the boat.

  28. #273
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    Default Re: A bit of fill and antifoul will sort it out.

    The battery box cover is built, so just needs tidy up and paint.
    The side of the engine box is framed out, with removeable panels to access the noisy bits.
    Just need to glue it up. I've figured out how to make the frame removeable without destruction if needed.



    The corner panel needs to make some changes in plane which I thought I could achieve by torturing some 4mm ply. It did work with some adjustment, but the sheet wanted to be concave not convex. It meant I was going to have to put some structure behind it to make it work how I wanted.



    I decided to cut the panel up and used it as patterns for a cubist style engine box. I'll glue it all together from 6mm ply with some glass on the back to support the joins.



    Once these bits are made, they will get paint/varnish and the front cover and lid can be reused from the old box with a bit of surgery.
    The whole lot will get some noise insulation and hopefully it will be nice and quiet(ish).

  29. #274
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    Default Re: A bit of fill and antifoul will sort it out.

    Should be a happy engine, encased in artwork!
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

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