Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 35 of 39

Thread: Hadron single handed "Merlin Rocket"

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    4,985

    Default Hadron single handed "Merlin Rocket"

    We have a designer in the UK, Keith Callaghan, who works away quietly designing superb wooden racing dinghies, and fast small trailer sailors. He has been designing successful Merlin Rockets for a very long time.

    For 2011, Keith has designed a singlehanded dinghy in which he can train and gain fitness for crewing in the Merlin Rocket class.

    This new Hadron class is very sweet and I though forum members make enjoy looking her over.







    http://www.bluelightning.co.uk/Hadron/Hadron01.shtm

    And here is the designers thoughts on her,

    "Hadron is a new design for 2011. I have got back into racing dinghy design in the last few years, and in 2011 plan to get back into crewing Merlin Rockets - in particular MR3708 "Wicked". As part of my fitness training I am building a new singlehander design which I have developed from the same hull shape as "Wicked". Although the market is full of singlehander dinghies, the search is still on for a singlehander which will fulfill the requirements of the experienced dinghy sailer who is perhaps, like myself, getting on a bit, but who nonetheless demands high performance, and without too much pain. In other words, the boat must have impeccable handling characteristics, be comfortable to sit out and to sit in, easy to right after a capsize, and of course be fast and rewarding to sail. Just like a Merlin Rocket."

    Here in build showing her central buoyancy which aids righting and recovery after a capsize.



    Kits are available from Alec Jordan so I guess US kits could also be sorted.

    So there you are, an absolutely up to date home build racing dinghy for the older sailors who still wants a refined sailing experience.

    Brian

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Brooklin, Maine
    Posts
    1,498

    Default Re: Hadron single handed "Merlin Rocket"

    What a fabulous boat. Thanks, Brian.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Ash, NC (not Asheville)
    Posts
    12,103

    Default Re: Hadron single handed "Merlin Rocket"

    My biggest issue with single handed racing dinghies is that most (all?) require the crew to weigh 170+lbs. Usually closer to 180.
    On a really good day I can hit about 160 but if I don't eat like a horse it'll make it's way back to around 145.

    Any idea on the recommended crew weight for this design or would I need a tiller extension and an 8' hiking board?

    Doug

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    4,985

    Default Re: Hadron single handed "Merlin Rocket"

    Hi Doug, Keith Callaghan is not a big guy. we met up at a dinghy show a few years ago. Around 140 lbs I would guess. He is after all training to get fit as a merlin crew so cannot be that heavy and he designed the boat for his own use. Here he is as proud designer and builder.



    Check out the video at the bottom of the pictures page. http://www.bluelightning.co.uk/Hadron/Hadron01.shtm

    For some more boat porn have a look at his latest Merlin Rocket.



    and finished at the Crystal palace Dinghy Show



    picture by Didital images UK.

    Glad you like her Carl. Keith is a really nice guy who designs lovely boats.

    Brian

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Norwich,United Kingdom
    Posts
    8,272

    Default Re: Hadron single handed "Merlin Rocket"

    Nice looking boat and I recognised the broad it is sailing on.I am particularly pleased to see the central buoyancy tank as I fear that the mass produced plastic racing dinghies of the last few years all float too high after a capsize.This means that a wet,tired and possibly none too fit sailor has to haul his waterlogged self up onto the centreboard very swiftly or the windage of the hull rapidly moves it downwind of the rig leading almost inevitably to another capsize as the wind gets under the rig as it emerges from the water.The cycle then repeats.
    The sail area looks generous at 9.5 sq.m as a Moth has 8 sq.m and a bit more beam with the wings.It certainly appears to slip along very nicely in the clip and I would echo the comment about Keith Callaghan being a pleasant fellow based on a brief chat we had at a show a few years ago.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    4,985

    Default Re: Hadron single handed "Merlin Rocket"

    Good observation about the central buoyancy. Dinghies which float too high on their sides and then invert causing more problems and masts to break in shallow waters is now very common. Also too much buoyancy making it very hard to get back on board for the singlehander is also common.

    The central buoyancy is an attempt to solve a number of issues:

    having no buoyancy at the sidedecks allows the gunnel to sink fully and for the boat to lay on her side with the mast horizontal - so reducing inversion risk

    when righting the boat there is no buoyancy to force downwards to right the boat, the hull rolls around her central buoyancy tank

    when righting a hull a lot of free water is scooped up and can rush to the nearside as she comes up - re-capsizing the boat on top of you. This central tank reduces the amount of free water and stops that free water rushing to the nearside.

    I am very much looking forward to seeing how the capsize and recovery tests go. This is a very innovative and thoughtful concept and I hope it goes well. Climbing back in will be interesting to see. It looks as if the gunnel will easily dip to the surface water level to roll back onboard, and perhaps some of the lifted water as she rights which is trapped on the other side of the central tank will help counter balance rolling back on board. I know the National 12's reduced the size of their transom drains to slow the drainage so that more water was kept in the hull to keep her more stable whilst the crew climb back in.

    Brian

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Ipswich, Suffolk, UK
    Posts
    5

    Default Re: Hadron single handed "Merlin Rocket"

    I'm am delighted that you guys like the look of my new HADRON dinghy. To answer your query, Doug, about crew weight: I am about 160lbs, and I designed the boat with someone of my weight, or a little heavier, in mind. However, that does not rule out lighter crews, as the boat has a raking rig. This feature has been developed in the Merlin Rockets (and no doubt other classes). By raking the rig up to a metre (3-4ft) aft at the masthead, the rig is de-powered, thus enabling lighter crews to get to windward as fast as the heavier guys. Don't ask me about the science of this - all I can tell you is that it works (perhaps sokmeone can explain it on the Forum?). That's why Hadron appears to have a kicked up boom in the pics of her sailing in light winds, as when the rig is fully raked the boom is horizontal. John, by the same reasoning, I can put up sufficient sail area to be fast in light winds, but can then de-power when it blows up. Mike McNamara (my sailmaker friend, and a multi national and world champion in several dinghy classes) reckons I could have even more sail area and still be comfortable when it blows, but I have yet to evaluate that.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Ash, NC (not Asheville)
    Posts
    12,103

    Default Re: Hadron single handed "Merlin Rocket"

    Thanks for responding to my question Keith.
    It really looks like a fun, fast boat. I might like to build one someday.

    I can maintain about 160 if I really work at it.
    Could you please pass the potatoes?

    Doug

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    4,985

    Default Re: Hadron single handed "Merlin Rocket"

    Keith, I wonder if you have carried out capsize tests yet, and whether you achieved your aim to make capsize recovery possible for the more mature sailor? The central buoyancy, zero gunnel buoyancy looks to have good promise, so it will be good to see how this worked out.

    Brian

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Ipswich, Suffolk, UK
    Posts
    5

    Default Re: Hadron single handed "Merlin Rocket"

    Brian, I have not yet tested the buoyancy configuration. It is the first thing that I will do when I put HADRON on the water again. At the moment I am fitting some extra rig control lines and cleats, but she should be sailing by next week. I'll report back when the test is completed. By the way, the central buoyancy tank makes an excellent seat - no more kneeling in the bottom of the boat!

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    West Boothbay Harbor, Maine
    Posts
    24,514

    Default Re: Hadron single handed "Merlin Rocket"

    Interesting features!! The central buoyancy tank would provide a wide base for a weighted, sliding, drop keel for those of us even less athletic than the designer. I like the low-down bow buoyancy tank also. If possible I'd want to leave the foredeck off and just have it open all the way. A forward deck on a boat like this can be dicey when trying to bring a boat up to a dock or mooring (which is where I'd want to keep my kit built version.)

    A dialed down Contender for the speed-minded set.
    “Eventually, all things merge into one, and a river runs through it. The river was cut by the world's great flood and runs over rocks from the basement of time. On some of those rocks are timeless raindrops. Under the rocks are the words, and some of the words are theirs."

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    4,985

    Default Re: Hadron single handed "Merlin Rocket"

    Quote Originally Posted by rbgarr View Post
    Interesting features!! The central buoyancy tank would provide a wide base for a weighted, sliding, drop keel for those of us even less athletic than the designer. I like the low-down bow buoyancy tank also. If possible I'd want to leave the foredeck off and just have it open all the way. A forward deck on a boat like this can be dicey when trying to bring a boat up to a dock or mooring (which is where I'd want to keep my kit built version.)

    A dialed down Contender for the speed-minded set.
    That's a very interesting thought. The boat kind of exists already. Keith already has a singlehander with a ballasted centreboard - she's called Haze4000 - and she pre-dates Hadron, and keith mentioned that hadron is a further development of Haze4000. I also thought, mmmmm........, perhaps put the ballasted centreboard in Hadron.
    http://www.bluelightning.co.uk/Haze/haze01.shtm

    Brian

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    Oriental, NC USA
    Posts
    5,337

    Default Re: Hadron single handed "Merlin Rocket"

    You have a really nice boat there with some innovative ideas Keith. The hull reminds me a bit of a boat that appeared in an AYRS Bulletin in the 1980's called the "Shooting Star". The central buoyancy chamber looks brand new to me and I would like to know how the reboarding would go. With a crew, it should be easy with one on each side but looks dicey for one alone. Climbing over the transom might be easier as it seems that the boat would just roll into the crew when boarding over the down side. If the high side can be crossed quickly, perhaps you can get back in before the water flows out of the down side and that would balance the boat for a short time. That is how I would try it.

    I notice the buoyancy bags near the stern in the show photo. Not sure whether they will help or hinder reboarding. I think I might rather that the central chamber be extended aft instead. More flotation and still allows the down side to sink. Too much boat for me (80 in September) but I like it a lot anyway.
    Tom L

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    West Boothbay Harbor, Maine
    Posts
    24,514

    Default Re: Hadron single handed "Merlin Rocket"

    I saw the Haze4000 on the website but liked the Hadron hull more. I'd prefer a keel that stayed put. A Lightning sailor once had the stainless centerboard slam back into the box when she'd capsized as he was trying to right the boat. Chopped off one of his fingers. Bloody mess, to say the least.
    “Eventually, all things merge into one, and a river runs through it. The river was cut by the world's great flood and runs over rocks from the basement of time. On some of those rocks are timeless raindrops. Under the rocks are the words, and some of the words are theirs."

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    London
    Posts
    291

    Default Re: Hadron single handed "Merlin Rocket"

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Lathrop View Post
    I notice the buoyancy bags near the stern in the show photo. Not sure whether they will help or hinder reboarding. I think I might rather that the central chamber be extended aft instead. More flotation and still allows the down side to sink. Too much boat for me (80 in September) but I like it a lot anyway.
    The green boat at the boat show, with a jib and buoyancy bags, is a Merlin Rocket - a different boat (& different design) from the blue Hadron which doesn't have a jib. Merlin Rockets sail with a crew of two.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    Oriental, NC USA
    Posts
    5,337

    Default Re: Hadron single handed "Merlin Rocket"

    Quote Originally Posted by Presuming Ed View Post
    The green boat at the boat show, with a jib and buoyancy bags, is a Merlin Rocket - a different boat (& different design) from the blue Hadron which doesn't have a jib. Merlin Rockets sail with a crew of two.
    Yeah, I should have looked more closely but was just following the gist of the thread a little too carelessy.
    Tom L

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    4,985

    Default Re: Hadron single handed "Merlin Rocket"

    Looks like hadron has been enjoying more time on the water and has practised a capsize.








    There is also an extra video on the site http://www.bluelightning.co.uk/Hadron/Hadron01.shtm

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Ipswich, Suffolk, UK
    Posts
    5

    Default Re: Hadron single handed "Merlin Rocket"

    The buoyancy test was interesting. Several of the comments above expressed concerns about righting a singlehander from a capsize, and I am aware of such problems as the boat capsizing on top of the helmsman as he tries to re-enter the boat. So one function of the central buoyancy tank on Hadron is to stop the transverse transfer of water as the helmsman climbs in. This proved very effective in the test. The other option of climbing in over the transom is facilitated by the transom cutaways either side of the rudder stock.
    When capsized, the boat floated on its side in level trim with the centreboard about 6-8" (150-20mm) clear of the water. In other words, the central tank was 100% above the water. It only came into play when the boat righted, and as you can see from the above photo very little water is left in the boat after righting: if the transom flaps were opened, another inch or so of water would drain out by gravity. Nearly all of the rest will exit via the flaps as soon as the boat gathers way.
    The one problem encountered with the buoyancy test was that as soon as the mast filled with water (this took about 15-20 seconds) the boat started to invert. And because the mast was full of water the boat was more difficult to right, until the water had drained out of the rigging tee-plate holes etc. So I am looking for ways of putting some positive buoyancy in the spar. With an internal halyard, this may not be easy. Does anyone have any ideas?

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    4,985

    Default Re: Hadron single handed "Merlin Rocket"

    Hi Keith, glad the test went so well. Solving the mast buoyancy when you have an internal halyard could be a challenge.

    I have done some work on sealing masts with external halyards that might help. My last Scow had carbon tubes for her lug rig and to keep all three tubes buoyant I ensured there were no holes drilled anywhere. All fittings were strapped on using 3mm dyneema. For instance, small holes drilled in the sail track located the mainsheet and kicker positions. So minimising all holes can help.

    The yard was tapered and very thin section. I was worried about it failing under compression so made up about 12 circular boat building foam discs, each sized to the internal diameter and pushed them up the tube to their correct positions. If these were epoxied in place they caould be used to slow water ingress, still not applicable to internal halyard.

    Working with Axel in Switzerland on a three piece alloy tube mast, he used a technique of putting cling film inside the tube end , spraying foam in, then pulling the foam out, removing the cling film and then pushing the foam back in to a position which allowed space for the mast joints. So each three piece section was fully sealed. Again good ideas but not with an internal halyard. You could cut out a small tube section for the halyard, or insert a tube for the halyard.

    Perhaps the correct size of inner tube might help seal things. One section below the shroud attachments, pulled up as high as possible. then a second piece above the shrouds which is pulled down over the shrouds and overlaps the first piece.

    My first dinghy was an OK and it had an external halyard with a clip at the masthead. Does mean a slack halyard blowing in the wind.

    How was climbing aboard her?

    Brian

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Whidbey Island, WA. USA
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: Hadron single handed "Merlin Rocket"

    I'm so glad to see so much enthusiasm for Keith's new Hadron; I love it, and think it would suit me well - I'm over 60, weigh 150 lbs, and used to own a Merlin Rocket that I absolutely loved.....
    I moved to the USA over a year ago, and am missing my Merlin, which I had to sell, as shipping was too prohibitive. I found I could could easily manage the Merlin Rocket solo in light to moderate winds (I only capsized once in 7 years of owning her), so the Hadron would be ideal in many ways. I've searched for a Merlin over here and know there was a Merlin built here in 2005 on the east coast, but cannot find a way of contacting the owner (John Keeling) to see if he might sell......(it's a long shot!)...
    So, I am left with the terrible choice of whether to build the Merlin (I prefer the look - and I could then take a crew) or the Hadron.
    Whichever I chose, my preference would be for a double-bottom all the way through, and no foredeck (like in Nat 12's, etc) and that shouldn't be too difficult, and would mean I could use thinner ply on the bottom whilst maintaining stiffness (I wouldn't bother building the Merlin strictly to class rules, as I wouldn't be racing - but I just LOVE the lines....!) . I might even consider adding a trapeze for a bit of fun.
    Just trying to think it through....ideas.....budget considerations..........any ideas?
    (Meanwhile am having fun with an Iain Oughtred designed 'Whilly' boat that I managed to find here, but so miss the planing hull and fine entry)
    Mike
    Puget Sound, Washington

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    usa
    Posts
    8,495

    Default Re: Hadron single handed "Merlin Rocket"

    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Callaghan View Post
    With an internal halyard, this may not be easy. Does anyone have any ideas?
    I love your design. How will aluminum masts affect performance? I have aluminum tubes as masts on my CK 17. I sliced foam noodles(popular pool toys) the long way on my table saw. I then stuffed them in the top part of eash mast. That might leave enough room for the halyard to operate. . . . .When I dumped my CK 17 the masts stabalized about 4 inches under the surface. . . . .This solution cost me about $5 and worked well.
    __________________________________________________ ________________________

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    victoria, australia. (1 address now)
    Posts
    66,079

    Default Re: Hadron single handed "Merlin Rocket"

    I do like this design, I am a one time Cherub sailor and it's only the necessity for a crew that has stopped me acquiring one. I already have a Fireball that doesn't get enough use for that reason even though I have a reduced rig for it. Like boatbum I am a lightweight and an 'older' sailor to boot. Like mikescott I reckon a trapeze could be fun but she looks fast enough. As most of my sailing is off the beach in a big shallow bay the foredeck is not a problem for me, and might be a a place for a dry change when I sail across the bay for a pub lunch. Being in Aus. kits would be unavailable, how about plans?

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Whidbey Island, WA. USA
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: Hadron single handed "Merlin Rocket"

    Keith Callaghan will sell you plans...just look on his website.

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    victoria, australia. (1 address now)
    Posts
    66,079

    Default Re: Hadron single handed "Merlin Rocket"

    Thanks.

  25. #25

    Default Re: Hadron single handed "Merlin Rocket"

    anyone building Hadron in Maine?
    Paul from Lamoine.

  26. #26
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Whidbey Island, WA. USA
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: Hadron single handed "Merlin Rocket"

    Sounds like you might be.....! Guess you should ask Keith Callaghan - he must have sold them the plans.......good luck!

    Dieharddinghysailor

  27. #27
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    Oriental, NC USA
    Posts
    5,337

    Default Re: Hadron single handed "Merlin Rocket"

    This is a nice looking boat that probably performs very well. I do have one issue with it though. I don't like frames for many reasons and airbags even less. If air tanks and side decks were combined, the needed rigidity (even better) could be had without all those frames and air bags cluttering up the interior. Using appropriate plywood for tanks should not increase the weight either. Self rescue would be much better too. I like the boat and these things don't change it substantially.
    Tom L

  28. #28
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    4,985

    Default Re: Hadron single handed "Merlin Rocket"

    Tom, I can assure you Keith has put great thought into capsize recovery.

    Side tanks hold the boat too high on it's side and risk inversion and make use of the centreboard much harder. Keith uses a central tank so the hull immerses to keep the hull low in the water and can then rotate around that buoyancy as it comes up when righting the boat. I don't think she even has air bags. She has an under deck tank.


    http://www.bluelightning.co.uk/Hadro...2020120512.pdf




    The transom drains then clear the water out the back. Even he drain size is thought through. Too large and the boat empties too fast, smaller drains allow slower clearance so that the weight of water helps stabilise the boat while the helm sorts himself out and then sails away.

    I would say that Hadron has the best thought through capsize recovery behaviour of any boat available to home build.

    Brian
    Last edited by keyhavenpotterer; 01-18-2013 at 03:00 AM.

  29. #29
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Wongawallan Oz
    Posts
    16,378

    Default Re: Hadron single handed "Merlin Rocket"

    I love it!!!!
    Larks

    “It’s impossible”, said pride.
    “It’s risky”, said experience.
    “It’s pointless”, said reason.
    “Give it a try”, whispered the heart.

    LPBC Beneficiary

    "Keep away from people who try to belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you, too, can become great!"

  30. #30
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    4,985

    Default Re: Hadron single handed "Merlin Rocket"




    Central buoyancy pods are optimum for boats (typically high performance planing transom types) that can drain water aft out of the transom automatically when flooded after recovery. The boats float lower when at 90 degrees and are easier to recover this way. It also stops it sloshing side to side quickly causing re capsize. The floor forward tank is tall enough off the floor to stop water sloshing forward after recovery and means it has to go out the back. One affect of that central buoyancy pod, is its a nice wide seat running fore and aft for low wind sailing and boat balance fore and aft.

    Side tanks and decks are optimum for boats (typically narrower displacement types) that can't drain water out aft and have to be bailed after recovery to reduce water in the boat after recovery, plus they also give side storage and a drier boat certainly for cruising. Being narrower in beam the side tanks work to keep water out but don't get in the way of recovery from a 180.

    Wide winged beamier aft planing type boats can unfortunately invert easily with too large a side tank due to the buoyant under deck area tipping/ levering the mast tip down into the water when sat at 90 degrees, into potential full inversion because the buoyancy chamber is further out. When its at 90 its deeper in the water and it its pushing up: the net result is the boat tips witht he mast weight into full 180, especially with a light hollow alloy floodable mast. The buoyant side tanks then unfortunately make it harder to recover from a full 180 as they have to be re-submersed and exert a large affect as they are out on a longer lever, making it possibly to be too stable and remain inverted.

    You could make a more typical displacement boat self drain like Hadron, but you'd have to put a false floor in above the floors, an inch of two above the water line, inclined aft to a bigish drain or well. Only problem with this is you are then sat higher up, on not in the boat, not on seats but the side deck and you have to forgo the side tank storage. You also get sloshing back up through the well at sub planing speeds unless you put large drain tubes in out to either side. Its good to be sat up and out on a planing boat to get the leverage to force it onto the plane, plus a planing boat doesn't suffer reflux at planing speeds as water in the boat is getting sucked out, and they are slightly more aft down stem up in profile at high speeds speed, especially with a gennaker. In very light air the transom where the holes are is pulled out of the water with forward crew weight to reduce wetted area or the boat tipped onto its side.

    Different types of boats have different optimum arrangements because of their beam, shape, type and weight.


    Ed
    Last edited by keyhavenpotterer; 01-18-2013 at 06:11 AM.

  31. #31
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    Oriental, NC USA
    Posts
    5,337

    Default Re: Hadron single handed "Merlin Rocket"

    We are probably talking past each other a bit potter. I can appreciate the thinking that was done and accept that it works as claimed. We all have out prejudices and a dislike of frames is one of mine. I also like a boat that I can sail without needing a wet suit. There are many way to make a boat self rescue with little water inside. I should keep quiet since my complaints are mostly quibbles on a boat that I do admire.
    Tom L

  32. #32
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Fiddletown, on Vineyard Lane
    Posts
    3,753

    Default Re: Hadron single handed "Merlin Rocket"

    i like it. would bulkheads therefore replace the frames?

  33. #33
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    Oriental, NC USA
    Posts
    5,337

    Default Re: Hadron single handed "Merlin Rocket"

    Quote Originally Posted by davebrown View Post
    i like it. would bulkheads therefore replace the frames?
    Yes and no. No additional bulkheads. Longitudinal panels making a (mostly) triangular cross section box would provide the needed rigidity for the open hull structure. After cogitating about it more though, I think this is the designer's hull and he has done what he thinks is best for this particular boat. That it performs to the desired level is reason enough. On a boat that is likely to be upset while sailing and the skipper is prepared for this in the conditions sailed in, the design obviously works. It is just my personal aversion to cross frames that prompted my comments. I tend to like boats where I can stay out of the water and relatively dry which may say something about my age and inclinations.
    Tom L

  34. #34
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: Hadron single handed "Merlin Rocket"

    Keith has repositioned the frames for boats after he built his. I've just finished building one with the new frame position. See http://Www.littlejoesolutions.co.uk/...ron dinghy.jpg

  35. #35
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Whidbey Island, WA. USA
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: Hadron single handed "Merlin Rocket"

    I fancy building one with a double bottom to replace the 'central box', and to have an open fore area (no foredeck) with mast bracing like in 14's. Narrower side decks, and a 90 degree stem a la Merlin.

    Dieharddinghysailor

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •