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Thread: Interesting News Stories...From Your Communities and the World....

  1. #1436
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    Default Re: Interesting News Stories...From Your Communities and the World....

    Meet Sweep, the sea-faring sheepdog


    https://inews.co.uk/news/environment...st-role-945287

    Nick

  2. #1437
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    Default Re: Interesting News Stories...From Your Communities and the World....

    Great stories, Birlinn and NickW... I really enjoyed reading them both. It’s great to read things from different places.
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  3. #1438
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    Default Re: Interesting News Stories...From Your Communities and the World....

    They do say that you cannot teach old dogs new tricks. Well, meet Peggy the deaf sheepdog who has learnt to herd sheep using sign language.


    https://metro.co.uk/2021/04/10/deaf-...uage-14388427/


    Nick

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    Default Re: Interesting News Stories...From Your Communities and the World....

    Quote Originally Posted by NickW View Post
    They do say that you cannot teach old dogs new tricks. Well, meet Peggy the deaf sheepdog who has learnt to herd sheep using sign language.


    https://metro.co.uk/2021/04/10/deaf-...uage-14388427/

    Nick
    Wonderful, feel good story. Thanks for sharing.
    Choose wisely -Treat kindly...

    A secret to a good marriage is to have a quick mind and a slow mouth...



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  5. #1440
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    Default Re: Interesting News Stories...From Your Communities and the World....

    Here is a story about a man who mailer himself from Australia to England (home)...

    The Welshman who mailed himself home from Australia in a box https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/w...ome/index.html
    Choose wisely -Treat kindly...

    A secret to a good marriage is to have a quick mind and a slow mouth...



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  6. #1441
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    Default Re: Interesting News Stories...From Your Communities and the World....

    Quote Originally Posted by NickW View Post
    They do say that you cannot teach old dogs new tricks. Well, meet Peggy the deaf sheepdog who has learnt to herd sheep using sign language.


    https://metro.co.uk/2021/04/10/deaf-...uage-14388427/


    Nick
    All our best dogs used to work with hand signals. Not just to save yelling, but to avoid startling sheep and everything else around and also when it was too windy or they were too far away to hear voice commands. If the dogs could see our arm movements we could work them. JayInOz

  7. #1442
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    Default Re: Interesting News Stories...From Your Communities and the World....

    Leicester narrowboat in low-speed police chase



    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-englan...shire-56946448

    Nick

  8. #1443
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    Default Re: Interesting News Stories...From Your Communities and the World....

    Quote Originally Posted by NickW View Post
    Leicester narrowboat in low-speed police chase

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-englan...shire-56946448

    Nick
    So - is he now locked up or not locked?
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  9. #1444
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    Default Re: Interesting News Stories...From Your Communities and the World....

    A not so wise owl rescued from the same fireplace twice in two days.


    A tawny owl which fell down a chimney and had to be rescued gave home owners a shock - when it returned to the same place the following day.
    Ed and Joyce Jones found the bird when they heard a commotion coming from the living room in Allerton Road in the town on 27 April.
    They called the RSPCA who managed to coax it out with a net.

    But the following day, the couple again went in their living room and were shocked to discover that the owl had returned - and was sat on the same spot on the fireplace happily sleeping.
    I couldn’t believe it the first time - then the fact it came back the day after - I thought I might have to start charging it rent!
    Ed Jones, 67
    They say the bird looked like an ornament sat on the fireplace because it was again asleep and perfectly still.

    The RSPCA came back again, and again rescued the owl.
    So far there's been no return but the Jones say they've had an 'owl of a shock'!
    https://www.itv.com/news/granada/202...ples-fireplace

    Nick

  10. #1445
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    Surveyor survives bear mauling off Richardson Highway near Gulkana
    Mark Thiessen

    Associated Press

    Allen Minish was alone and surveying land for a real estate agent in a wooded area off the Richardson Highway northeast of Glennallen, putting some numbers into his GPS unit when he looked up and saw a large brown bear walking about 30 feet away.


    “I saw him and he saw me at the same time, and it’s scary,” he said by phone Wednesday from his hospital bed in Anchorage, a day after being mauled by the bear in a chance encounter.


    The mauling left Minish with a crushed jaw, a puncture wound in his scalp so deep the doctor told him he could see bone, lacerations and many stitches after a 41/ 2- hour surgery. He also is wearing a patch over his right eye, saying the doctors are worried about it.

    All that damage came from a very brief encounter — he estimates it lasted less than 10 seconds — after he startled the bear Tuesday morning near Gulkana, located about 190 miles northeast of Anchorage.

    The bear, which Minish said was larger than 300-pound black bears he has seen, charged and closed the ground between them in a few seconds.

    Minish tried to dodge behind small spruce trees. That didn’t stop the bear; he went through them.

    As the bear neared, Minish held up the pointed end of his surveying pole and pushed it toward the bear to keep it away from him.

    The bear simply knocked it to the side, the force of which also knocked Minish to the ground.

    “As he lunged up on top of me, I grabbed his lower jaw to pull him away,” he said, noting that’s how he got a puncture wound in his hand. “But he tossed me aside there, grabbed a quarter of my face.”

    “He took a small bite and then he took a second bite, and the second bite is the one that broke the bones — and crushed my right cheek basically,” he said.

    When the bear let go, Minish turned his face to the ground and put his hands over his head.

    And then the bear just walked away.

    He surmises the bear left because he no longer perceived Minish as a threat. The bear’s exit — Alaska State Troopers said later they did not locate the bear — gave him time to assess damage.

    “I realized I was in pretty bad shape because I had all this blood everywhere,” he said.


    He called 911 on his cellphone. While he was talking to a dispatcher, he pulled off his surveyor’s vest and his T-shirt and wrapped them around his head in an attempt to stop the bleeding.


    Then he waited 59 minutes for help to arrive. He knows that’s how long it took because he later checked his cellphone record for the length of the time he was told to stay on the line with the dispatcher until rescue arrived.

    At one point, he was able to give the dispatcher his exact coordinates from his GPS unit, but even that was a struggle.

    “It took a while to give them that because I had so much blood flowing into my eyes and on to the GPS, I kept having to wipe it all off,” he said.

    He said one of the rescuers called him a hero after seeing how much blood was on the ground.

    Rescuers tried to carry him through the woods to a road that parallels the nearby trans-Alaska pipeline to meet an ambulance. That didn’t work, and he said they had to help walk him a quarter mile through swamps, brush and trees. From there, he was taken to a nearby airport and flown to Providence Alaska Medical Center in Anchorage by a medical helicopter. He is listed in good condition at Providence.

    Before help arrived, he worried about the bear returning to finish him off. “I kept hearing stuff,” he said, but every time he tried to lean up to look around, he became dizzy from the loss of blood.


    “He didn’t come back, and so I just lay there and worried about it,” he said.


    Minish, 61, has had his share of bear encounters over the 40 years he’s lived in Alaska, but nothing like this. He owns his own surveying and engineering business, which takes him into the wild often.


    “That’s the one lesson learned,” he said. “I should have had somebody with me.”


    He left his gun in the vehicle on this job but said it wouldn’t have mattered because the bear moved on him too fast for it to have been any use.


    He can now add his name to the list of six people he knows who have been mauled by bears in Alaska.

    “I guess I feel lucky,” Minish said of his encounter with the bear, after someone told him it’s better than being dead.

    “In all honesty, it wouldn’t have mattered either way. You know, if it killed me, it killed me. I had a good life; I’m moving on. It didn’t kill me, so now let’s move on to the other direction of trying to stay alive,” he said.
    Choose wisely -Treat kindly...

    A secret to a good marriage is to have a quick mind and a slow mouth...



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  11. #1446
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    Default Re: Interesting News Stories...From Your Communities and the World....

    ^ ........and you blokes are worried about the dangerous animals in Australia?
    Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication. Leonardo da Vinci.

    If war is the answer........... it must be a profoundly stupid question.

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    WILDLIFE Anchorage

    2nd bear killed after rummaging through trash in West Anchorage, official says

    Tess Williams

    Anchorage Daily News

    Two black bears have been killed in as many days after they were seen digging through trash on a street in Anchorage’s Turnagain neighborhood, a wildlife biologist said Tuesday.

    West Anchorage is an unusual place for bear activity, but four bears in total have been reported there recently, said Anchorage area biologist Dave Battle with the Alaska Department of Fish and Game.

    A bear was first reported late last week getting into garbage on Forest Park Drive. Wildlife biologists observed the bear over the weekend and decided to kill it Monday morning because it had become too accustomed to humans and was reliant on garbage as its main source of food, Battle said.

    On Monday night, Battle said, a different bear began roaming Forest Park Drive and was reported dipping into several trash cans that had been left out in advance of collection day Tuesday. More reports of the bear rustling through garbage poured in Tuesday morning, and Battle said biologists noticed the bear had an injured leg.

    Battle estimates the male bear was about 3 to 4 years old.

    Officials killed the bear Tuesday morning near the intersection of Forest Park Drive and Northern Lights Boulevard, he said. They decided that was the best course of action because of the bear’s injuries combined with the fact that it was headed toward busy portions of the city.

    On Monday afternoon, a female black bear was relocated after it wandered into a busy section of Spenard, Battle said. The bear had been reported at DeLong Lake and near Connor’s Bog Park over the weekend, he said. It wandered into town Monday and was reported in an area between Arctic Boulevard and Minnesota Drive, Battle said.

    That bear wasn’t digging through trash or acting aggressive, and Battle said it likely just wandered too far into town. Wildlife officials decided to dart the bear with a tranquilizer and relocate it far from town.

    Battle said it’s unusual for the Department of Fish and Game to relocate bears, but in this case the bear was not showing any concerning behaviors.

    “So with that one, we decided to try to give it a break and give it a chance to survive,” he said.

    Each year the Department of Fish and Game has to kill nuisance bears. Often, the bears are attracted to garbage or bird seed in town because they are an easy food source, Battle said. The animals can become reliant on the food and also become so accustomed to people that they present a danger. Last year in Anchorage, officials killed 16 bears and another nine were killed by people defending their life or property.

    Battle said there has been an abundance of unsecured trash and some bird feeders in the Turnagain neighborhood recently, but he’s not sure if there are other things drawing bears to the western part of town. It’s unusual to have so many reports of bears in West Anchorage, he said.

    “You don’t know if there was some sort of natural food crops that really came in that drew a bunch of them over there either this spring or even last year, and they ended up in that area, and now they’re kind of dispersing in the neighborhoods,” Battle said. “Or if something weird is going on — like someone is intentionally feeding bears over on the west side and it’s drawing more of them over there. It’s all conjecture at this point.”

    Another black bear was reported Monday at Point Woronzof, although Battle said it was not causing any problems.

    The department is working with Alaska State Troopers to cite homeowners who may have left unsecured trash out or kept out bird feeders that can draw bears into town, Battle said. People who routinely leave out garbage or have bird feeders during bear season can be fined $320, he said.

    The best way to keep bears out of neighborhoods is to use bear-resistant trash cans, or store garbage indoors and make sure it is not left outside other than on collection day, Battle said. Bird feeders should not be left up during months when bears are active.
    Contact Tess Williams at twilliams@adn.com.


    Choose wisely -Treat kindly...

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  13. #1448
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    NIKISKI

    Woman flown to hospital after being stomped by moose, troopers say

    Tess Williams

    Anchorage Daily News
    A 51-year-old Nikiski woman was trampled by a moose Monday afternoon and flown to an Anchorage hospital for treatment of her injuries, Alaska State Troopers said.
    A moose had been in the area of Interlake Drive for several days, troopers spokesman Austin McDaniel said. On Monday, neighbors reported a newborn calf was resting between Crystal Cook’s fence and an RV on the property, troopers said in an online report. The cow was on the other side of the fence, troopers wrote.
    “Witnesses noted the calf called the cow in tones of distress, and Cook attempted to move toward the calf to stimulate the calf to move,” troopers wrote. “At that time, the cow jumped the fence onto Cook’s property and knocked her to the ground, and began trampling her.”
    Cow moose are known to become aggressive if they are concerned about the safety of their calf. McDaniel said it wasn’t clear why Cook was trying to get the calf to move.
    Witnesses called troopers just before 6:45 p.m. to report that Cook had been attacked, McDaniel said.
    The cow and calf headed for a nearby wooded lot and neither were located, troopers said.
    Cook was treated by paramedics for multiple injuries and flown to an Anchorage hospital, according to troopers. She was in fair condition Tuesday, troopers said.
    This is the time of year when many moose are giving birth, and troopers said it’s important not to approach calves or come between a cow and calf.
    Cow moose are known to become aggressive if they are concerned about the safety of their calf. McDaniel said it wasn’t clear why Cook was trying to get the calf to move.


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  14. #1449
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    Slang survives generations and remains ‘cool’.

    Frank Baker

    Slang words and expressions are an integral part of our language, yet in America’s fast-paced, rapidly changing society, some of them seem to endure through the decades.
    Obviously, different races and cultures invented many of their own slang terms. I’ll undoubtedly (not on purpose) leave out some in this march through time. One that comes to mind is “cool,” which replaced the word “swell” that was dominant in the 1940s and 1950s during my sister’s high school years. “Cool” remains popular today among both young and old, and seems to cover a wide range of situations.
    I’m no scholar of the English language, but slang seems to be humans’ way of adding a bit of octane or power to our vocabulary, perhaps to make it more colorful and interesting.

    During a 1970s stint in the U.S. Navy, for example, I learned that fellow sailors would ignore anything someone said unless it was liberally punctuated with curse words. One adapts quickly to be seen and heard.
    It’s fun to recall popular slang words and expressions through time. Another common word during my 1960s high school years was “b****in’.” It was an import to Anchorage from California, which also sent us dance and clothing styles.

    In Anchorage, we adopted these language and cultural shifts on a delayed basis. If it was popular in Los Angeles about 1960, it was at least a year before it came here, and even later in small towns like Seward.
    For example, actor James Dean died in 1955. But with all of the pompadour hair styles, black leather jackets and motorcycles in Seward in the 1960s and 1970s, you would think the Hollywood heartthrob was still alive.
    Another California-born expression was “zero charisma,” referring to a dull or dorky person. Provocative, but it never caught on.

    The 1960s-70s brought my peers “groovy,” “far out”, “out of sight” and “dig it.” Added were expressive terms like “give me the skinny,” “keep on truckin’,” “heavy, man,” “catch my drift,” “for sure,” and “what a drag.” I recall “awesome” in the 1970s, and it’s still around today. People in the 1960s and 1970s said “take care,” and it is very prevalent today.

    In the 1980s with the trans-Alaska pipeline full of oil and creating wealth for Alaska, terms like “bodacious” and “gnarly” and “radical” surfaced. “Bad” meant good. “Bogus” and “airhead” were definitely negative terms. I have no idea where “gag me with a spoon” came from. Again, it was probably a California invention. I do recall a phrase unique to the Alaska’s pipeline era called the “Slope stare.” It described a kind of dazed look of those who had been in the Arctic for many months without a trip south. With the more recent 1990s, I remember the word “like” in front of many sentences, such as “like, I was going in there and saw this guy.” “Dope” didn’t always mean drugs, but instead, cool or good. A phrase to put someone at ease, “It’s all good,” was one I used myself, and more often, “back in the day,” revealing my age. Younger people seemed to be practitioners of the term “don’t go there” and “freak out.”
    A lot of people said “whatever.”

    One of the year 2000 terms that confused me
    was “word,” which I later learned meant that the person heard and understood what you said. At first, I thought it meant I had used an incorrect word. For those extremely exhausted, the term “trashed” came on the scene. “You go girl” had energy and was widely used. Others that I recall were “cool beans,” and “as if.”

    Moving into the 21st century, we were barraged with social media acronyms such as LOL (laughing out loud); BTW (by the way); FTW (for the win); and IDC (I don’t care). I made up my own to best describe a flagging memory: CRAFT (Can’t Remember A Friggin’ Thing).
    I tried to coin a new term for a meaningless Tweet, called a “chirp.” It never took hold — even though we heard a lot of them from 2016 to 2020.

    It’s been around for quite a while, but it seems like today, just about everyone says “have a nice day.”
    Perhaps it’s because the coronavirus of 2020-2021 brought us so many bad ones. Before the pandemic, I don’t think I ever heard the word “jab” to describe a vaccination, or “social distance” to describe physical spacing.

    “OK, boomer” hasn’t yet been spoken to me by a young person, but I’ve heard it’s popular today.
    They’d be wrong, however; because I don’t consider myself a “boomer.” Born early in 1945, I prefer being lumped in with the “World War II babies.”

    I’m mostly oblivious to the slang of today’s teens.
    Instead of “for real,” which was embraced by my generation, I believe they now say “no cap.” Another one, “extra,” means a person is way over the top.
    “Snatched” means good.

    “Chill” is used often to suggest “settle down.” “Slay” can describe someone who looks amazing.
    Across the generations, people from all locations and walks of life have developed their own slang, and I think it’s interesting to watch it change and evolve. Because we’re in a computer age, people no longer “think things over.”

    They “process” them. “Beta” means information. If you’ve heard someone say “I don’t have enough bandwidth for that,” they’re not necessarily talking about their computer space or network capability.
    Conversations have become “exchanges.”

    As I’ve aged, I’ve found myself employing fewer slang words and expressions. If I used the term “hunky dory,” spoken often by my sister and mother in past years, people would look at me as if I were a space alien. Same goes with “phooey,” used by my father.

    I’ll stick with “cool.” It comes out the winner every time.

    A lifelong Alaskan, Frank E. Baker is a freelance writer who lives in Eagle River.

    I do recall a phrase unique to the Alaska’s pipeline era called the “Slope stare.” It described a kind of dazed look of those who had been in the Arctic for many months without a trip down south.



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  15. #1450
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    6.1 earthquake shakes Southcentral Alaska


    • Author: Anchorage Daily News
    • Updated: 3 hours ago
    • Published 5 hours ago



    An earthquake with a reviewed magnitude of 6.1 was recorded in the Talkeetna Mountains at 10:59 p.m. Sunday, May 30, 2021. (Screengrab from U.S. Geological Survey website)






    An earthquake with a magnitude of 6.1 centered under the Talkeetna Mountains in the Matanuska-Susitna Borough shook Southcentral Alaska on Sunday evening.

    The quake hit just before 11 p.m. and was centered about 60 miles east of Talkeetna and around 100 miles northeast of Anchorage, according to the Alaska Earthquake Center. It was centered at a depth of about 27 miles. the center reported.

    The USGS initially reported the preliminary magnitude as 6.0 and later adjusted the magnitude to 6.1 after review.

    The earthquake was felt from Homer to Fairbanks, and was felt especially strongly the Mat-Su and Anchorage areas. ADN readers on Facebook described items falling off shelves, and many described rolling motion.

    “Talkeetna...long rumble followed by a very strong jolt that flexed the house and sent some stuff on shelves to the floor,” wrote Mark Westman of Talkeetna. “Then more rumbling. It was a long one. No damage, but the big jolt in the middle definitely rattled the nerves, that one packed a punch.” He later added in a message, “It was notable for the duration as well as the big jolt in the middle.”

    Ellen Betts, who lives northeast of Wasilla, said “it started out gently then grew in magnitude in waves...It lasted more than a minute.”

    There were no immediate reports of damage.

    According to the Alaska Earthquake Center, the quake was centered 55 miles north of Sutton and 65 miles northeast of Palmer.







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    A herd of elephants has roamed 300 miles across China and is headed toward a city.

    No one knows where they are going or why. Since last March, a family of wild elephants in southwest China has trekked more than 300 miles, traveling north through fields, highways, villages and towns.

    They have stolen crops, rolled around in villagers’ courtyards looking for food, and broken into a car dealership where they drank buckets of water and left muddy footprints. The herd has been labeled “The Northbound Wild Elephant Eating and Walking Tour.” In one incident, two young elephants reportedly raided a villager’s stores of corn liquor and later appeared to pass out in a field.

    “We have no way of telling where they are going,” Chen Mingyong, a professor at Yunnan University who studies wild elephants, told state broadcaster CCTV.

    From local residents to officials and TikTok influencers, the country has been transfixed by the family of 15 Asian elephants who have ignored police sirens and trucks laden with food, attempts to lure them home to their nature reserve in Xishuangbanna near China’s border with Laos and Myanmar.

    On Wednesday, the family reached the outskirts of Kunming, the provincial capital of Yunnan, where authorities fear deadly accidents between residents and the wild animals will become more likely.


    — Daily News wire reports
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  17. #1452
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    Default Re: Interesting News Stories...From Your Communities and the World....

    I'd love to know what the elephants are looking for.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  18. #1453
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    Sometimes, it's best not to draw attention to oneself.

    Drug dealers were caught with cocaine with a street value of £500,000 after undertaking a police patrol car as they sped along a motorway hard shoulder.



    The two dealers used the hard shoulder to avoid queuing on the M6 near junction seven in the West Midlands.


    But they sped past a patrol car and then drove away at 100mph when police asked them to stop.


    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-englan...ngham-57358040

    Nick

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    Coast Guard rescues friends adrift in giant inflatable flamingo near Kodiak

    By
    Jared Griffin - KMXT -

    June 8, 2021


    Nation Sega (center) and friends pose with USCG crew after being rescued in Monashka Bay. (USCG) Being rescued by the Coast Guard while out on the water or a hike is not entirely unusual in Kodiak. But it is if you’re being dragged out to sea on a giant inflatable flamingo.
    It was a picturesque summer Saturday last weekend in Kodiak. Nation Sega, his sister, her roommate and dogs were enjoying the sunny skies and warm temperatures out in Monashka Bay, about 5 miles from the city of Kodiak.
    Giant inflatable pink flamingo and crew await rescue in Monashka Bay (USCG)
    It’s a common spot for recreators to fish, swim, surf, and kayak. But Sega and his friends brought something different: A pink inflatable flamingo.
    “We usually do it in a lake, where we’re usually more cautious,” Sega said. “But Saturday we were just having too much fun and not paying attention.”
    They weren’t worried at first, but by afternoon, the winds picked up and pulled the flamingo riders out across the bay.
    “Then we were in the middle of nowhere at one point, but we just called 911, and were ‘Okay, we don’t have any paddles or lifejackets. Can you send someone out here?’ We were hanging out waiting for someone to show up,” Sega said.
    As they waited for rescue, the flamingo drifted toward some offshore rocks until they finally ran aground.
    About an hour later, an MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter from Coast Guard Air Station Kodiak came to their rescue, hoisting them up.
    Alaska State Troopers and the #USCG worked together to determine that due to the treacherous circumstances, a helicopter hoist was the best option to bring these folks and their animals back to shore, safe and sound!” the Coast Guard said on Facebook.

    The Alaska Troopers recovered the flamingo, but have not yet returned it to its owners. Sega said he intends to get it back. He and his fellow flamingo riders plan to ride it out again — but next time, they’ll be more prepared.
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  20. #1455
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    Default Re: Interesting News Stories...From Your Communities and the World....

    The flamingo story made NPR! I heard it this afternoon as I was driving through northern New York.

    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

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    Wildlife troopers don’t plan to cite man who helped baby moose
    Associated Press

    Alaska Wildlife Troopers do not intend to issue a citation to a man who was seen lifting a baby moose over a guardrail in Southcentral Alaska over the weekend, though it is illegal to “handle any wild animal in a similar fashion,” an Alaska State Troopers spokesperson said Thursday. Spokesperson Austin McDaniel said Alaska Wildlife Troopers “strongly advise people to stay a safe distance from all wildlife, including moose calves, as the animal may react aggressively towards humans.”

    Anyone who sees a wild animal that may need help should call the nearest law enforcement agency or the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, McDaniel said in an email to The Associated Press.

    Alaska’s News Source reported an Anchorage man, Joe Tate, was driving home Sunday from a fishing trip with friends when he saw a line of cars and a moose in the road on the Kenai Peninsula.

    Tate said a mother moose was pacing in the road, and a young calf struggled to scale a guardrail to join her. He estimated watching for about 30 minutes. He said he considered calling wildlife officials or law enforcement but worried an accident could occur in the time it would take for them to arrive.


    Friends with a trailer got between the mother and the calf, breaking the line of sight, Tate said. Another vehicle positioned itself similarly on the opposite side of traffic.


    Tate said he then lifted the calf over the guardrail and helped it steady itself on the pavement before letting it return to the adult moose.

    “It was calculated,” Tate said. “It was something we kind of looked at and talked about before we did it. It worked out for the best. And it could have gone bad, and I understand and know that. But it did go for the best, and it was worth the risk that I took.”

    Dave Battle, a biologist with the Department of Fish and Game, said people should do all they can to avoid handling wildlife like this.
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    Default Re: Interesting News Stories...From Your Communities and the World....

    A project to remove electricity pylons from a protected landscape has led to archaeological discoveries dating back 6,000 years.


    The National Grid is burying six miles (9km) of power cables in Dorset's Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB), near Winterbourne Abbas.


    Excavations ahead of the works revealed a Roman settlement as well as Neolithic and Bronze Age finds.


    The oldest artefacts were flint tools and pottery from about 4,000 BC.




    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-dorset-57411051



    Catsbarrow was among a number of burial sites unearthed by archaeologists

    Nick

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    Quote Originally Posted by NickW View Post
    A project to remove electricity pylons from a protected landscape has led to archaeological discoveries dating back 6,000 years.


    The National Grid is burying six miles (9km) of power cables in Dorset's Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB), near Winterbourne Abbas.


    Excavations ahead of the works revealed a Roman settlement as well as Neolithic and Bronze Age finds.


    The oldest artefacts were flint tools and pottery from about 4,000 BC.




    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-dorset-57411051



    Catsbarrow was among a number of burial sites unearthed by archaeologists

    Nick
    Thanks for this very interesting story. I’m glad to see someone else post stories too.
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  24. #1459
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    This was too interesting not to post it here.

    Massachusetts lobster diver survives being swallowed by whale: 'I was completely inside'
    A commercial lobster diver says he was swallowed whole by a whale off the Massachusetts coast Friday but made it out alive with only minor injuries following the life and death encounter.
    Michael Packard, 56, of Wellfleet, was released hours later from a Cape Cod hospital following his scary encounter with a humpback whale. He told WBZ-TV he was 45 feet deep in the waters off Provincetown when the attack occurred.


    He initially thought the whale was a shark but realized he was wrong when he didn't feel any teeth or pain.


    "All of a sudden, I felt this huge shove and the next thing I knew it was completely black," Packard recalled Friday afternoon, according to the Cape Cod Times. "I could sense I was moving, and I could feel the whale squeezing with the muscles in his mouth."
    "I was completely inside (the whale); it was completely black," he added. "I thought to myself, ‘there’s no way I’m getting out of here. I’m done, I’m dead. All I could think of was my boys, they’re 12 and 15 years old."
    Packard said he thinks he was in the whale's mouth for about 30 seconds. He was able to breathe because he still had his breathing apparatus.
    In an effort to save himself, Packard said he began shaking the whale's head before the animal surfaced and ejected him. In a Facebook post, he said the whale "spit me out" and that he escaped with bruises and no broken bones.
    Packard's mate, Josiah Mayo, plucked him out of the water and headed back to shore. Fox News has reached to Packard but has not heard back.


    Experts told the newspaper that humpback whales are not aggressive animals, especially toward humans.
    "Based on what was described this would have to be a mistake and an accident on the part of the humpback," said Jooke Robbins, director of Humpback Whale Studies at the Center for Coastal Studies in Provincetown.
    The Associated Press contributed to this report.
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    New Zealand houseplant sells for $19,200 in online bidding war

    By Susannah Cullinane, CNN
    Updated 4:58 PM ET, Sun June 13, 2021



    This screen-grab shows the price of the winning plant in New Zealand dollars.



    Auckland, New Zealand (CNN)A houseplant with just nine leaves has sold for a record-breaking $19,297 on a New Zealand auction site.

    Bids for the "very rare white variegated Rhaphidophora Tetrasperma" closed Sunday night, rising in the last four minutes as bidder "foliage_patch" battled the eventual winner, tagged "meridianlamb."
    Trade Me spokesperson Millie Silvester told CNN that the plant was "the most expensive houseplant ever sold" on the auction site.
    "After a heated bidding war in the auction's final minutes, the rare plant had over 102,000 views and more than 1,600 watchlists, which just goes to show how much Kiwis adore houseplants," she said in a statement emailed to CNN.
    In New Zealand dollars, the bid was $27,100. Silvester said the average price for an indoor plant on Trade Me had jumped from 34 NZD in May 2019 to 82 NZD last month with rare varieties commanding "massive prices."
    "Houseplants have become the 'it' item over the last couple of years, we've seen prices creep up and up as more Kiwis jump on this new trend," she said.
    "This plant has 8 leaves with the 9th just about to uncurl. Each leaf has excellent variegation as does the stem and is well rooted in a 14cm pot," the description for the Rhapidophora Tetrasperma provided by seller "Hurley88" reads.

    The variegated Rhaphidophora Tetrasperma came in a 14cm pot.


    "Variegation" refers to two or more different colors in the leaves of the plant.
    Rhapidophora Tetrasperma is native to Thailand and Malaysia, according to the Royal Gardens at Kew's online plant register.
    Hurley88 said the condition of this specimen was "used" and that pickup from its location in New Zealand's biggest city, Auckland, was preferred.
    There were 248 bids for the plant.
    Late last year, the same seller listed a variegated Monstera plant on Trade Me that sold for 6,551 NZD, promising 1,000 NZD of the proceeds to charity







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  26. #1461
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    Restaurant tests out pizza topped with cicadas

    By Rachel Trent, CNN
    Updated 11:43 PM ET, Sun June 13, 2021



    The Spicy Thai Cicada Pie from the Pizza Bandit in Dayton, Ohio, is not available to the public.



    (CNN)Those aren't olives...

    An Ohio restaurant seems to have found a use for the Brood X cicadas pestering parts of the Midwest. The Pizza Bandit in Dayton tested out a Spicy Thai Cicada Pie.
    Yes, that's a pizza with cicadas on it.

    The Spicy Thai Cicada Pie featured blanched and sautéed locally foraged cicadas and a crust adorned with cicada wings.

    Before you get too excited -- or repulsed -- know that the restaurant is not selling cicada-topped pizzas. In a Facebook post showing off the new creation, the business noted, "We're not even sure if we legally can sell you locally foraged Cicadas."
    The restaurant did livestream a tasting panel trying out the pizza, which also featured miso hoisin sriracha sauce, mozzarella, provolone, mushrooms, cabbage, green onion, mango, cilantro and a spicy Thai sauce.
    "Opinions of the pizza range from absolutely delicious to...well...uh...yeah...," the Facebook post said.
    While cicadas are not toxic, the US Food and Drug Administration has warned people not to eat the insects if they are allergic to seafood. "These insects share a family relation to shrimp and lobsters," the FDA said.








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    Default Re: Guide's 50th summiting of McKinley probably a record....

    SKILAK LAKE
    Bear attacks, injures sleeping campers in their tent
    Tess Williams

    Anchorage Daily News
    Two campers were attacked in their tent by a bear early Saturday along the shoreline of Skilak Lake, an official from the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge said.
    Officials don’t know yet why the bear attacked or what kind of bear was involved, said Leah Eskelin, a public information officer for the wildlife refuge.
    “It was a short, quick, in-your-tent attack,” she said.
    The two people were camping in a dispersed area near the mouth of Hidden Creek, Eskelin said. There were no other campers in that immediate area Saturday morning, she said.
    The campers had been sleeping when the bear attacked their tent around midnight, said wildlife biologist Jeff Selinger of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game.
    The campers had bear deterrents, including a bear horn and spray, but didn’t have time to use them, Selinger said.
    “There’s no indication that they did anything to prompt the attack or did anything wrong,” he said. “It’s one of those where you happen to be in the wrong place at the wrong time.”
    The campers described the attack as quick and intense, Selinger said. Once it stopped and things quieted down, the two quickly loaded some of their gear into kayaks and set out to the Upper Skilak Lake Campground boat launch, he said. The campers were well prepared with first aid supplies, Selinger said.
    Cell service is spotty around Skilak Lake, Selinger said, and it’s unlikely that there was service where the two campers were attacked. Selinger said the kayak trip took about an hour and a half to two hours.
    At the campground boat launch, other people administered first aid and called for help using a satellite phone, according to a statement from the wildlife refuge. One of the campers was airlifted to a nearby hospital and the other was taken by ambulance, Selinger said.
    Officials did not provide details about how severely the campers were hurt.
    “We’re grateful that they got the care that they needed right away and that everyone really came together at the campground to provide that aid and give them a quick response time,” Eskelin said.
    Biologists from the state Department of Fish and Game visited the scene Saturday with federal wildlife officers from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Eskelin said.
    There were no bears in the area when officials visited the scene, but they collected a collapsed tent and other camping gear, Eskelin said.
    “ADF& G is working on seeing if they can pull any DNA material off of that, like hair, because they want to see if they can find out what kind of species it is and that might help determine why the bear acted the way it did,” she said.
    Selinger said DNA is often found on clothing of bear attack victims, also, but the evidence is sometimes lost during the chaotic aftermath of an attack. Biologists can determine the sex and species from the DNA, which Selinger said can help them determine which bear was involved and track if the same animal causes conflicts in the future.
    Selinger said the ground near the campsite is made up mostly of rock and gravel, which makes it difficult to find animal tracks or other clues that would normally help fill in details about what happened during an attack.
    Hidden Creek Trail, which is a nearly 3-mile loop trail that leads to Skilak Lake, was closed Saturday after the attack, Eskelin said. The trail reopened Sunday but Eskelin said there are signs posted to warn people to use caution.
    “It’s one of those scenarios where if you close an area and have no activity on it, you stand to make it only a wildlife area,” she said. “So the trail is reopened and it’s signed with clear information that the area was involved in a bear incident and some safety information.”
    Selinger said it would be wise to avoid the area because the bear could still be around. Officials are still investigating but Selinger said anyone recreating in the area should use caution and carry safety supplies like bear deterrent and first aid supplies.
    “The big thing is being prepared as well as these folks were. You could get attacked in the Fred Meyer parking lot — you’re always in bear country here,” Selinger said. “Always have some medical equipment, maybe compression bandages and things you may not think of. And whenever you’re going out, just be prepared in case something does happen — have a plan of how to get back to safety or how to contact somebody.”
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    Default Re: Guide's 50th summiting of McKinley probably a record....

    David Reamer
    ANCHORAGE HISTORIES

    History of the Princess May: A famous photograph, lighthouses and a whirlwind romance

    It was four in the morning of Aug. 5, 1910. The Princess May, a white-painted Canadian Pacific Railway steamer, churned through the treacherous Lynn Canal at 12 knots. The 80 passengers, 68 crew members, and a cargo of gold and mail left Skagway at 9 p.m. the previous evening and were bound for Vancouver. Fog crept in over the still waters. The crewman at the wheel watched as Sentinel Island, its lighthouse visible, grew larger in view. Rocks suddenly appeared through the darkness. Though the pilot reacted quickly, it was already too late. The Princess May ground against the hidden reef before seizing to a stop, gaping wounds in its hull. Later that day, the falling tide revealed the steamer caught upon its perch. The bow loomed upward at a 23-degree angle, jutting above the water. A photographer captured the striking, almost unreal image. The photograph circled the nation in newspapers, magazines, postcards and prints. The wreck of the Princess May soon became one of the most recognizable pictures in America. And though the incident occurred more than a century ago, many Alaskans might still be familiar with the image of a boat seemingly pointing toward the sky. However, the rest of the story is slightly less well known. The 249-foot steamer first launched out of Hebburn, England, as the SS Cass in 1888. The Cass was built by Hawthorne, Leslie, and Co. for the Formosa Trading Co. “Formosa” is an older term for what is now the Republic of China(Taiwan). The ship traded up and down the Chinese coast from 1888 to 1901. It changed owners and names several times, from Cass to Arthur back to Cass to Ningchow to Hating. Along the way, the steamer was also the site of several colorful if poorly documented incidents, including a mutiny and pirate attack.
    In early 1901, the newly organized Canadian Pacific Railway Coastal Service purchased the Hating for what would become their princess fleet, a collection of smaller ocean liners all with names beginning with Princess. The Hating thus became the Princess May, named after Mary of Teck, also known as Princess May of Teck, who became the Queen of England in 1910 alongside her husband, King George V.
    By June, the steamer, advertised as “the most elaborately equipped ship on the run,” was on a regular schedule between Skagway and Vancouver, including through the highly trafficked Lynn Canal. It alternated with the first ship in the Canadian Pacific Railway’s fleet, the SS Islander.

    Rest of the story in link

    https://adn-ak.newsmemory.com/
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  29. #1464
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    COMMENTARY. Alaska Daily News
    My grandparents were stolen from their families as children. We must learn about this history.
    Deb Haaland

    As I read stories about an unmarked grave in Canada where the remains of 215 Indigenous children were found last month, I was sick to my stomach. But the deaths of Indigenous children at the hands of government were not limited to that side of the border. Many Americans may be alarmed to learn that the United States also has a history of taking Native children from their families in an effort to eradicate our culture and erase us as a people. It is a history that we must learn from if our country is to heal from this tragic era.

    I am a product of these horrific assimilation policies. My maternal grandparents were stolen from their families when they were only 8 years old and were forced to live away from their parents, culture and communities until they were 13. Many children like them never made it back home.

    Over nearly 100 years, tens of thousands of Indigenous children were taken from their communities and forced into scores of boarding schools run by religious institutions and the U.S. government. Some studies suggest that by 1926, nearly 83% of Native American school-age children were in the system. Many children were doused with DDT upon arrival, and as their coerced reeducation got underway, they endured physical abuse for speaking their tribal languages or practicing traditions that didn’t fit into what the government believed was the American ideal.

    My great-grandfather was taken to Carlisle Indian School in Pennsylvania. Its founder coined the phrase “kill the Indian, and save the man,” which genuinely reflects the influences that framed these policies at the time.
    My family’s story is not unlike that of many other Native American families in this country. We have a generation of lost or injured children who are now the lost or injured aunts, uncles, parents and grandparents of those who live today. I once spent time with my grandmother recording our history for a writing assignment in college. It was the first time I heard her speak candidly about how hard it was — about how a priest gathered the children from the village and put them on a train, and how she missed her family. She spoke of the loneliness she endured. We wept together. It was an exercise in healing for her and a profound lesson for me about the resilience of ourpeople, and even more about how important it is to reclaim what those schools tried to take from our people.

    The lasting and profound impacts of the federal government’s boarding school system have never been appropriately addressed. This attempt to wipe out Native identity, language and culture continues to manifest itself in the disparities our communities face, including long-standing intergenerational trauma, cycles of violence and abuse, disappearance, premature deaths, and additional undocumented physiological and psychological impacts. Many of the boarding schools were maintained by the Interior Department, which I now lead. I believe that I — and the Biden-Harris administration — have an important responsibility to bring this trauma to light.

    Our children, parents and grandparents deserve a federal government that works to promote our tribal languages, culture and mental health. Many Native children want to learn their tribe’s language, songs and ceremonies. Many Native families want the children who were lost to come home, regardless of how long ago they were stolen.
    The obligation to correct and heal those unspeakable wrongs extends to today and starts with investments such as those President Biden has made to strengthen tribal sovereignty through the American Rescue Plan, the American Jobs Plan and the budget for fiscal 2022.

    Our administration has set out to forge a new path to engage with tribal communities and to live up to its trust and treaty responsibilities. But that obligation also requires that all Americans listen and learn, that we allow federal boarding school survivors and their families an opportunity to be heard, and that we engage in meaningful tribal consultation to seek justice. Though it is uncomfortable to learn that the country you love is capable of committing such acts, the first step to justice is acknowledging these painful truths and gaining a full understanding of their impacts so that we can unravel the threads of trauma and injustice that linger. We have a long road of healing ahead of us, but together with tribal nations, I am sure that we can work together for a future that we will all be proud to embrace.
    Deb Haaland, the U.S. interior secretary, is the first Native American to serve as a Cabinet secretary
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    Default Re: Interesting News Stories...From Your Communities and the World....

    From https://www.bournemouthecho.co.uk/ne...d-day-veteran/
    A DOCUMENTARY has “conclusively proved” that two wrecks found in Poole Harbour are D-Day veterans.
    History Hit worked with historian Stephen Fisher to uncover the truth behind the two wrecks.
    Through a painstaking research process which involved drawing on resources including a postcard aerial photo of Poole Harbour in the 1950s and an out-of-print book, the wrecks have been identified as landing craft.


    Nick

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    Head of world's 'largest family' dies in India, leaving behind 39 wives and 94 children
    Joe Wallen
    Mon, June 14, 2021, 12:52 AM

    A family photograph of the Ziona family, with a total of 181 members. Ziona Chana, 67, is at the front -
    Barcroft Media

    E629E58E-D873-4233-8FEA-58C4043EEF0C.jpeg

    A man believed to have the world’s largest family, including 39 wives, 94 children, 33 grandchildren and one great-grandchild, has died in the northeastern Indian state of Mizoram.


    Ziona Chana, 76, was the head of a polygamous Christian religious sect with 4,000 members, and his extended family all lived together in one 100-room, four-storied mansion in the remote village of Baktawng Tlangnuam. The sect was founded by his father.


    Mr Chana, a construction worker, developed a rota system for which of his wives would share his bed on any given night, with his remaining spouses sharing a dormitory nearby.
    “I consider myself a lucky man to be the husband of 39 women and head of the world’s largest family,” Mr Chana told the Daily Mirror in 2012.


    The polygamist married his first wife, Zathiangi, at the age of 17, and reportedly wedded 10 of his other wives in the space of one year. His last marriage came in 2004 to a 25-year-old woman.

    AC11278A-8F07-4D29-A0B3-20A77559E6BC.jpeg

    <img alt="Mr Chana with some of his wives in his bedroom in 2011&amp;#xa0; - Barcroft Media&amp;#xa0;" src="https://s.yimg.com/ny/api/res/1.2/UetMB_g7tdagAfeX0AGhMA--/YXBwaWQ9aGlnaGxhbmRlcjt3PTY0MDtoPTM5OS45NjgwMTI3OT Q4ODIwNA--/https://s.yimg.com/uu/api/res/1.2/Vt9VsuETPEOtsGuHQgcbeA--~B/aD0xNTYzO3c9MjUwMTthcHBpZD15dGFjaHlvbg--/https://media.zenfs.com/en/the_telegraph_258/322d1cbcf9ea773c2e73baf6bb03f1a4" class="caas-img">


    Mr Chana with some of his wives in his bedroom in 2011 - Barcroft Media
    As his longest-standing wife, Zathiangi was given the responsibility of organising domestic chores.
    Polygamy is illegal under Indian law but permitted among a few northeastern tribes.
    His children and their partners lived in different rooms in the building but shared a common kitchen. The household was self-sufficient, running its own school and growing its own crops. It consumes as much as 100 kilograms of rice and 70 kilograms of potatoes every day.
    As a result, his unconventional mansion has become something of a tourist attraction.
    A guesthouse had been constructed within the residence to accommodate visitors - including many from abroad.

    022B6262-DBA6-4E50-BDD4-A4B57F346DB7.jpeg

    <img alt="Ziona Chana&amp;#39;s four-storeyed purple mansion is called &amp;#39;Chhuanthar Run&amp;#39;, which means &amp;#39;The House of the New Generation&amp;#39;, and is home to all 181 members of the family - Barcroft Media&amp;#xa0;" src="https://s.yimg.com/ny/api/res/1.2/vIwNjQUAoNfeGVd_oL7kpA--/YXBwaWQ9aGlnaGxhbmRlcjt3PTY0MDtoPTM5OS45NjgwMTI3OT Q4ODIwNA--/https://s.yimg.com/uu/api/res/1.2/TWn_PDwjIhmhNWpUYks3uA--~B/aD0xNTYzO3c9MjUwMTthcHBpZD15dGFjaHlvbg--/https://media.zenfs.com/en/the_telegraph_258/bda18d4ce47fcb45109b180e4994310e" class="caas-img">
    Ziona Chana's four-storeyed purple mansion is called 'Chhuanthar Run', which means 'The House of the New Generation', and is home to all 181 members of the family - Barcroft Media


    In 2014, the family featured in an advertisement of a leading dishwasher brand, according to the Hindustan Times, and twice appeared on the popular television show Ripley’s Believe It Or Not.
    “With heavy heart, Mizoram bid farewell to Ziona, believed to head the world’s largest family," said Mizoram’s Chief Minister, Zoramthanga, who like many inhabitants of the state goes by one name.
    "Mizoram and his village at Baktawng Tlangnuam has become a major tourist attraction in the state because of the family. Rest in Peace Sir!”
    Doctors in Mizoram said Mr Chana died in the state capital of Aizawl after his diabetes and hypertension deteriorated.
    There is some dispute as to whether Mr Chana was the head of the world’s largest family - one Canadian man has allegedly fathered 150 children.
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  32. #1467
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    Default Re: Interesting News Stories...From Your Communities and the World....

    thats a wry smile if there ever was one

    1BFD792E-A826-46EF-8135-813682CB3377.jpg
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  33. #1468
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    OUTDOORS

    Search continues for hiker who was reportedly charged by bears on Pioneer Ridge Trail

    The woman reached out to her husband after discharging spray but stopped responding to calls and texts shortly afterward, troopers say.
    Anchorage Daily News

    A woman who was reportedly charged by bears while hiking the Pioneer Ridge Trail near Butte remains missing after a daylong air and ground search Tuesday, Alaska State Troopers said.

    Efforts to find the missing hiker will continue until dark and resume in the morning, troopers spokesman Austin Mc-Daniel said Tuesday evening.

    Troopers in the Matanuska-Susitna Borough received a notification just before 1:30 a.m. Tuesday that a solo hiker on the trail needed help, according to an online report. The woman had reached out to her husband to ask for help after multiple bears charged her and she discharged bear spray, troopers said, and she stopped responding to calls and texts shortly afterward.

    Troopers said they went to the trailhead to conduct a rudimentary search of the first part of trail but didn’t find the woman. Starting Tuesday morning and multiple times throughout the day, the Alaska Rescue Coordination Center deployed a rescue team to fly over the trail and surrounding area, according to troopers.
    Volunteers with the Alaska Mountain Rescue Group and MAT+SAR also have been conducting ground searches using K9s, troopers said.

    The 4.5-mile Pioneer Ridge Trail, which begins at a parking area along Knik River Road south of Butte, is a moderately steep trail that tops out at about 5,300 feet after winding through dense forest and open tundra. From there, some hikers continue on a more technical route to the summit of Pioneer Peak.
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    STUDY: HALF OF US COSMETICS CONTAIN TOXIC CHEMICALS

    WASHINGTON — More than half the cosmetics sold in the United States and Canada are awash with a toxic industrial compound associated with serious health conditions, including cancer and reduced birth weight, according to a new study.

    Researchers at the University of Notre Dame tested more than 230 commonly used cosmetics and found that 56% of foundations and eye products, 48% of lip products and 47% of mascaras contained fluorine — an indicator of PFAS, so-called “forever chemicals” that are used in nonstick frying pans, rugs and countless other consumer products.

    Some of the highest PFAS levels were found in waterproof mascara (82%) and long-lasting lipstick (62%), according to the study published Tuesday in the journal Environmental Science & Technology Letters. Twenty-nine products with higher fluorine concentrations were tested further and found to contain between four and 13 specific PFAS chemicals, the study found. Only one item listed PFAS, or perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances, as an ingredient on the label.
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    Palmer hiker injured but alive after 2-day ordeal along Pioneer Ridge Trail


    An Alaska Air National Guard HH-60G Pave Hawk helicopter from the 210th Rescue Squadron searches for a missing hiker on Wednesday, June 16, 2021. (Bill Roth / ADN)

    A Palmer woman who was chased off the Pioneer Ridge Trail near Butte by bears was found injured but alive Wednesday after deteriorating weather had ended a second day of search efforts, officials said.

    Around 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, a search and rescue volunteer driving on Knik River Road reported seeing the hiker — identified as 55-year-old Fina Kiefer — walking out of the woods about a mile from the trailhead, Alaska State Troopers said in an online report. She flagged him down for assistance, according to the Alaska Air National Guard.

    Kiefer was taken to the hospital for evaluation of her injuries.

    Troopers in the Matanuska-Susitna Borough were notified just before 1:30 a.m. Tuesday that a solo hiker on the trail needed help. She had contacted her husband for assistance, saying that multiple bears charged her and she deployed bear spray, troopers said.

    “She was chased off the trail by bears and couldn’t find it again,” Master Sgt. Evan Budd, superintendent of the Alaska Rescue Coordination Center and a full-time member of the Alaska Air National Guard, said in a statement Wednesday night. “She had waterproof matches and was able to start a fire last night.”

    Kiefer stopped responding to calls and texts shortly after reaching out to her husband, kicking off an aerial and ground search involving troopers, the Alaska Mountain Rescue Group, the Alaska Air National Guard, MAT+SAR, Anchorage Nordic Ski Patrol and Solstice Search and Rescue Dogs.

    On Tuesday, the first full day of the search, volunteers continued ground searches until about 10:30 p.m. and the Guard searched the area by air throughout the night, according to troopers.

    Kiefer could see the helicopters but searchers couldn’t see her, said Budd, describing dense vegetation in the area.

    “It’s easy to see and hear an aircraft in the sky, but can be very challenging to spot a person at night under canopy,” Budd said.

    From left, Bill Laxson with Alaska Mountain Rescue Group, Tom Plawman of the Alaska Incident Management Team, and Alaska State Trooper Lt. Brent Johnson talk at the search base in parking lot of Pioneer Ridge Trail on Wednesday as the search continued for a missing hiker who reportedly encountered bears early Tuesday. (Bill Roth / ADN)
    The search continued by ground and air Wednesday with teams combing the area — on and off trail — for any sign of Kiefer. At least 18 people divided into multiple teams had been searching for her, said Bill Laxson, a senior member of the Alaska Mountain Rescue Group and part of the Alaska Incident Management Team for search and rescue.

    “There are folks that are searchers starting up at the ridgeline and working their way down and they also have searchers on the ground at the bottom working their way up,” troopers spokesman Austin McDaniel said earlier Wednesday. “So they’re kind of hitting it from both ends.”

    Heavy rain Wednesday afternoon placed an added burden on search and rescue teams, and the poor weather ultimately put an end to the day’s search with no evidence of the missing hiker.

    About an hour after the halt to Wednesday’s search effort was announced, an injured Kiefer was spotted emerging from the woods, according to troopers.

    Budd, with the Guard, recommended that hikers carry bear spray, matches, a satellite communication device, bright clothing and a personal locator beacon.

    “Being prepared for the unexpected is critical in the Alaskan outdoors,” he said. “What you plan as a day hike can quickly turn into a multi-day ordeal.”

    Search base in the Pioneer Ridge Trail parking lot on Wednesday. (Bill Roth / ADN)
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