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Thread: patience

  1. #36

    Default Re: patience

    Patience’s hull was distorted on the stbd side& the elm keel was hogged 103 mm, I got every ship cramp, G-cramp, boiler cramp, heavy joinery sash cramp & steel cramp that I owned, about a hundred & 8 RS J’steel girders & straightened the keel, the lead keel arrived separately, her half composite construction thankfully meant no steel curtain or margin plates, no steel : keel , keelson, centreline structure ,deckbeams , diagonal strapping or pillars, or the daily battle I had with the big class platers & shipwrights to get her hull fair, teaching Italian as fast as I could learn it, on Patience’s framing only the mast step, intercostals, floors, every 3rd frame, extra frame at mast partners, hanging & lodging knees, engine beds & 3 web frames were steel, minimal weld distortion, after I marked all plank positions on the edge of the steel frames with a grinderette nick, we pulled out every 2nd or 3rd steel frame & sent the port frame to a fabricators in Stuccoville ,( so called because half the town relied on stucco to fair it’s brutally welded hulls, even a kicked bucket is fairer, the other half of the town being beach towels at dawn, until Portofino), a simple bevelled angle iron, the stbd frame stayed in our yard, the floors went to the owners blacksmith near Torino, he wanted to renew these with false rivets, some hanging knees & web frame plates & patterns went to Manyana Marine where they might make them this year if were lucky, where the frames were weak or distorted I made a wooden template, & as I’d done on 75 new patterns, frames & floors for the big class ,
    I marked all the buttocks, waterlines, centrelines & planks ,& at every 2nd, 3rd or 4th plank I marked the bevels, you only need to mark the bevel whenever it changes, no more & no less, I couldn’t work out why every thing had to be so complicated ,why the owner couldn’t just choose one fabricator, then I realised that’s the way some people are in Stuccoville, incapable of doing things simply & directly, if it’s not complicated they don’t want to know, better the chaos they know than the clarity they don’t, afraid as they are to develop into fully formed efficient, responsible logical adults, you suddenly realise having seen operas only on television that you are now in one, all the constant shouting about nothing all the time, it’s the way they are, pig-ignorant juveniles, like their fathers whose personal development stopped at 14 at the school gates, thesaurus digested has no better word to describe them, also it’s hard to maintain your clarity & vigilance when some people in the yard are troublemaking & intent on sabotaging all the good works done by so many, I can elaborate later, suffice for now to state that the work is already busting your gut without having to cope with hotshot tosspot inadequate ego’s shooting their mouths off all day long, certain jerks in the yard were hell bent on drowning you in their sewer, their jealousy & paranoia in free fall, it amused the big class’s owner to hire some people for their ability to play practical jokes at our severe expense rather than for their non existent technical abilities, but like Keith Richards says, everything has its price & this is the price we paid for working here.

  2. #37

    Default Re: patience


  3. #38

    Default Re: patience


    kristoff, frank, yann, valdek , vawdek & matt the aussie guitarist steaming slovak oak frames, out of box into boat 3-10 minutes in february

  4. #39

    Default Re: patience

    cross spalls for bracing, new sternpost, deadwood & boning piece or fashion piece, temp bolts till bronze arrives,

  5. #40

    Default Re: patience


    old intercostals out at mast step, web frames, stringer patterns, old beds, new red leaded steamed frames, & some fresh, planks marked on frames, old planks out for cramping, some new in, ropes, cables tie hull supports together, cross spalls set in at height to work on deck framing

  6. #41

    Default Re: patience


    hull planked, caulked, splined above waterline, Valdek, my second on deck framing, as solid as a rock, & as reliable as a gardner diesel

  7. #42

    Default Re: patience

    http://s791.photobucket.com/albums/y...ent=img044.jpg" target="_blank">http://i791.photobucket.com/albums/y...ME7/img044.jpg" border="0" alt="radclyffe pat vawdek kingplanks">
    vawdek fitting king planks

  8. #43
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    9,424

    Default Re: patience

    Quote Originally Posted by peter radclyffe View Post
    as solid as a rock, & as reliable as a gardner diesel
    I looked at an early 20s English boat for a client in Vancouver. (A Thorneycroft and a beaut...) We had a couple motorheads along to check out the Gardners...a guy from Seattle who usually works on tug and fishing boat big thumpers. The other was a wily old Scot from Victoria.

    Their opinion was that the starboard engine had a weak cylinder but if one didn't want to fix it right away, it could wait fifteen years or so.

  9. #44

    Default Re: patience

    i love the dry humour,

  10. #45
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
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    Default Re: patience

    Quote Originally Posted by peter radclyffe View Post
    i love the dry humour,
    The Scot said his business was strictly limited to marine engines which turned under 1000 rpm.

  11. #46

    Default Re: patience


    sometimes i make models of boats i build

  12. #47

    Default Re: patience


    constant explanations to everyone, making sure they all understand whats happening, this takes time

  13. #48

    Default Re: patience

    old steel strap floors, new steel web floors, new planks & buut blocks, tourniquets, bottlescrews, chains, cables, shackles, ropes to pull her back into shape, around a ribband, new steel frames, marked to be drilled before painting, one scaffolding workshop the height near waterline will save hundreds of hours, with benches, temp scaff boards & ply , take your time making good fairing battens, they are sound reference points, old bronze rudder bearing rebored & fastened, sealed, caulked, new 5/16th for steamed frames, & 1/2 inch bronze carriage bolts for steel frames from Jamestown Distributors, with plastic top hat washers to reduce & hopefully eliminate electric current tracking, some hope,

  14. #49

    Default Re: patience


    the galley

  15. #50

    Default Re: patience

    air extractor, cooker, oven, dishwasher, washing machine to be fitted in crew cabin fwd, air conditioning-another installation nightmare, teak floorboards,

  16. #51

    Default Re: patience

    Slowly the new frames went in, the poles drilled 17mm for half inch bronze carriage bolts with plastic top hat washers to help insulate the bronze to steel battery, they help, but the current will still track thru’ condensation, we got the bolts from Jamestown Distributors, also 5/16” bolts for the steamed 60mm oak frames, I numbered the steel frames from the bow, as I’d done as foreman on Jeanie Johnston & the big class, I numbered all frames & planks inside & out, in this way everybody learns they are working in a grid, so if I tell you to put a water inlet midway between i.e. frames ( F )18-19,& planks ( P ) 6-7,you know exactly where to work & hopefully what to do, the 2 steamed frames between the steel frames I marked A & B respectively, a few days spent numbering will save hundreds of hours later on, in lost time & wrong placement of fittings, bulkheads, etc, the list goes on, so its best to take your time & do it properly, don’t use felt tip where it’s a finished surface as it may show thru’ paint, you can mark every 5th frame first, then any error will become apparent quicker than if you mark consecutively & reach the stern finding you’ve missed one number because i.e.( some troublemaker distracted you to tell you how important they are,), mark at the deck, bilge & keel, p & s, inside & out later at the beam shelves , deck, bulwarks & on the deck beams, & bulkheads on the centreline, fore & aft, & on a beamier boat port & stbd, & leave all these marks on as long as you can , even after the boat is launched if she’s fitting out afloat, later transfer these marks to marking tape as the varnish coats go on, so that wherever anybody is in a boat, even with all the planing & grinding sparks, whinging, sweating in 40 degrees C, 60 degrees at sea, cursing, posing, bullshotting, breeze shooting, planning, silica dust, sawdust, shavings, solvents, styrenes, glues, thunder, rain, lightning, sandstorms, the scirocco wind will deposit a layer of red sand on your car from Africa, shouting, screaming, scheming, violence, stupidity , alcohol hangovers & Class-A drug desperado’s withdrawals going on around you, you can still maintain your presence of mind & concentrate on your work, and build 2 beautiful wooden yachts, & their tenders.

  17. #52

    Default Re: patience


    yann on beamshelves,
    in the background, as lulworths interior arrived in containers i set it all up on scaffolding to find where it all fitted
    then we installed it

  18. #53
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Northern NSW Australia
    Posts
    73,741

    Default Re: patience

    Quote Originally Posted by peter radclyffe View Post
    old steel strap floors, new steel web floors, new planks & buut blocks, tourniquets, bottlescrews, chains, cables, shackles, ropes to pull her back into shape, around a ribband, new steel frames, marked to be drilled before painting, one scaffolding workshop the height near waterline will save hundreds of hours, with benches, temp scaff boards & ply , take your time making good fairing battens, they are sound reference points, old bronze rudder bearing rebored & fastened, sealed, caulked, new 5/16th for steamed frames, & 1/2 inch bronze carriage bolts for steel frames from Jamestown Distributors, with plastic top hat washers to reduce & hopefully eliminate electric current tracking, some hope,
    Hmmm !

    It does seem a little strange Peter ?

    and an absolutely beautiful project ! Thank you !
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  19. #54

    Default Re: patience

    its dodgy as hell Peter, i think it slows decay, but i dont think it stops it, but its what lloyds want, so whatever, the first boat i knew they used it on was Aello Beta, ex Xenia, Max Oertz which John Woolley rebuilt in bristol, 15 years ago

  20. #55

    Default Re: patience


    levelling the new teak archboard/transom block

  21. #56

    Default Re: patience


    hi folks, the strain of building these 4 boats almost killed me

  22. #57
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Northern NSW Australia
    Posts
    73,741

    Default Re: patience

    Good for the life of the plastic washers I suppose ...and then they could / will be replaced as needed .Something a little closer on the galv scale might have have been nice if Lloyds had agreed .

    It is the breakdown of lignuns in the timber surrounding the fastening that is the problem ?
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  23. #58

    Default Re: patience

    yes, finding the right balance of materials is a constant battle,
    if we ever do

  24. #59
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Northern NSW Australia
    Posts
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    Default Re: patience

    Most impressive Peter ,I dip my hat !
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  25. #60

    Default Re: patience

    what is happening with your design & build Peter, i tried to follow it, i am not an architect, but it is fascinating

  26. #61
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Northern NSW Australia
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    Default Re: patience

    I have a design ! I still need a small amount of work on the aft sections ...a bit more fullness according to Ed Burnett .I'll do that in a litle while ...I'm building extra accomodation here at home at the moment .....
    but I'm quite happy with the drawing ! She will be a good boat ....I hope ,I'm not a naval architect either !
    There is a sail plan at post 415
    http://www.woodenboat.com/forum/show...t=97232&page=9

    and a lines plan here at post 244
    http://www.woodenboat.com/forum/show...t=97232&page=5

    I think you've seen this version ,there have been fairly minor changes aft and to the transom ,a bit more shape added .I'll be back to building probably around the new year .
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  27. #62

    Default Re: patience


  28. #63

    Default Re: patience

    the fwd cabin

  29. #64

    Default Re: patience


    before the labour flood, someone had put a med deckhouse / caravan on her i guess,

  30. #65

    Default Re: patience

    The big class project hatchet manager & his mechanic bodyguards would snigger off to the bar where with the devils time on their hands they would invent their latest insults, having practiced them they would come back to the yard , pick a victim & the hatchet would insult someone, then like any coward, hide behind his bodyguards, sneering, “do you know who I am , do you know what I mean”.

  31. #66

    Default Re: patience

    Some of this seems long winded but it’s partly developed because publishers pay per word, otherwise you might be reading this as a text message, who knows, it may yet happen, so lets savour languages while we can. By now it will be apparent to all but the thickest project managers, that the work is only half the battle in yacht building, the relentless battle of wills, you all have to put your personalities to one side & concentrate on the work, you can shoot your mouths off later in the bar.

  32. #67

    Default Re: patience


  33. #68

    Default Re: patience

    stuffed hull to left in the scaffolding tent,
    lulworths rough cut honduras pitchpine cabin sole,
    douglas fir lower mast & boom
    spruce marconi topmast, gaff & topmast yard

  34. #69

    Default Re: patience

    Some of the guys I’ve worked with over the years reckon I take my work too seriously, is that so? Well if they took their work seriously, their caulking wouldn’t leak, their masts & spars would be round & symmetrical & yacht varnish finished, their designs would just for one day have the right placing, spacing, tracing, carving, diameters, welding, braising, timber, metal, fastenings, etc, their cockpits, scuppers & limber holes would drain water, their doors, lockers& drawers would open & shut properly & not jam, their skylights & hatches likewise & they’d be watertight, their re-fastened boats wouldn’t need re-fastening a week later, their sailtracks would glide, their rigging would hum, their sheaves would roll like Charlie Watts& Pino Paladino, there would be no scratches on their varnished grain, they’d know how to build, fit & fasten without epoxy, their sheers & seams would be fair , they would fashion curves less brutally than Elizabeth Frink, & I wouldn’t need to re-make their work. Cant take it too seriously, eh fellas.

  35. #70
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Northern NSW Australia
    Posts
    73,741

    Default Re: patience

    Quote Originally Posted by peter radclyffe View Post
    the fwd cabin
    Good grief !! I shall NEVER show you any of my work ....ever !
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

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