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Converting this small wooden boat into a casual sailor

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  • #16
    Re: Converting this small wooden boat into a casual sailobr />
    My gut feeling is along the same lines as Wizbang's. That looks like an awfully twitchy bottom shape to me. Just for grins, I'd stick it in the water and see what exactly you have before developing a re-building plan for it. It still may be worth buying if it's cheap enough, but there is no telling how the stability may be without testing it out.

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    • #17
      Re: Converting this small wooden boat into a casual sailobr />
      Well, she is a bit finer forward than a Whitehall, but has more bearing aft, and similar rise of floors. So as Whitehalls sail, she may also do well.
      It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

      The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
      The weakness of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web.

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      • #18
        Re: Converting this small wooden boat into a casual sailobr />
        I decided to pull the trigger. It was $150, and hard to say no to. Given that there's no rot or leaks, in the worst case I pretty it up and have a nice little row boat, maybe we could even use it as a temporary tender for our Westsail 32.

        I do like myself a project though, and don't mind putting in the work to do the conversion if I can decide it will work out.

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        • #19
          Re: Converting this small wooden boat into a casual sailobr />
          Great find! Lots of info out there on setting up small boats...might start with the Forum's own and get Todd Bradshaw's book. He has some great insights on rigging and sailmaking for small boats. Looks like she'd be a hoot to sail! And you might be able to use a mast partner as a forward rowing station for use as a tender.

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          • #20
            Re: Converting this small wooden boat into a casual sailobr />
            Good luck with it, keep us posted.

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            • #21
              Re: Converting this small wooden boat into a casual sailobr />
              Boat acquired! It definitely needs some work to get her back in a reasonable condition. Notably there are some cracks along the wood lines on the exterior near the bow. It also looks like there may have been some separation or movement on the transom. The keel has also seen better days, but I think the glass tape along the keel is all a recent addition by the last person who started the project but didn't get very far, and I don't think they did a stellar job with the glassing and it was doomed to fail.

              I'm guessing the exterior isn't glassed, but rather epoxied as part of the cold molding. I wonder if it's prudent to sand down the entire hull, inspect the wood and let it dry out if there are signs of water intrusion, and then glass it. Possibly also cut out and replace some of the keel, and maybe part of the transom. I also wonder if I can just remove the entire rub rail easily to make this job less painful.

              Otherwise the boat is in about the condition I expected. Will definitely need advice on the above repairs before I even began to contemplate a conversion.

              PXL_20221222_191741973.jpg
              PXL_20221222_191748348.jpg

              PXL_20221222_191825309.jpgPXL_20221222_191849527.jpg
              Last edited by BiggieSmallBoat; 12-22-2022, 01:44 PM.

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              • #22
                Re: Converting this small wooden boat into a casual sailobr />
                When epoxy turns yellow like that… yea it is sunburned and should come off.
                After it’s off , you’ll have a better feel for what else is goin on.
                The transom prolly wants actual knees, not the decorative wee bit that is there.
                With the right sander, yer lookin at a few hours, with the rong sander, you will hate the boat after about ten.

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                • #23
                  Re: Converting this small wooden boat into a casual sailobr />
                  Lucky for me, I've sanded/scraped a 27' full-keel boat all the way down through its layers of paint (including layers of bottom paint) and gelcoat, so anything sounds like a walk in the park compared to that job.

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                  • #24
                    Re: Converting this small wooden boat into a casual sailobr />
                    Build a flat wider keelson. Go for it and have fun doing it. IMG_3932.jpgIMG_3935.jpgIMG_3962.jpgIMG_3980.jpg Here's on I did on a cold molded dinghy.
                    David Satter www.sattersrestoration.com
                    "The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten" Ben Franklin

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                    • #25
                      Re: Converting this small wooden boat into a casual sailobr />
                      I did a similar retrofit job on a rowing hull a few years ago, although mine is a stripper. Pretty skinny boat , not the most stability in the world but that makes an easy driven hull.
                      Anyway , I used donor gear from a sailing dinghy I owned including rudder and centreboard, rig etc. worked out fine. Sails particularly well.

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                      • #26
                        Re: Converting this small wooden boat into a casual sailobr />
                        I did a cursory sanding down (in the time I had before it started raining) of one of the gapped pieces of planking to inspect the wood underneath, and it appears to be very dry. So that's good. It also appears that maybe there's gelcoat on the outside of the boat, it could be several layers of paint as well, but it's relatively thick, and has a chalky appearance.

                        I will continue to sand/scrape to gather more info, but I'm wondering if some of these strips have started to delaminate. The piece I revealed can be moved by pushing down on it with a finger.

                        PXL_20221227_001723144.jpg
                        PXL_20221227_001715643.jpg

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                        • #27
                          Re: Converting this small wooden boat into a casual sailobr />
                          I think that's probably not good. But it was a cheap boat, ripe for quick and dirty repairs.

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                          • #28
                            Re: Converting this small wooden boat into a casual sailobr />
                            Originally posted by johngsandusky
                            I think that's probably not good. But it was a cheap boat, ripe for quick and dirty repairs.
                            Probably not good that it's dry, or probably not good in regards to the delam?

                            For the delam, I've read of people drilling (many) small holes and injecting epoxy to re-bond the layers that have separated -- I think this falls into the quick and dirty repair category. It seems like the other option is to cut out the veneers and replace them in the area where they have started to delaminate -- which probably falls into a "proper" repair category, but not quick.

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                            • #29
                              Re: Converting this small wooden boat into a casual sailobr />
                              I might get slow cure epoxy into the existing crack with a syringe and a four inch knife, let gravity work for fifteen minutes, continue to pump with the knife, then send some small temp screws on fender washers to pull it into position.
                              Rather than drill a bunch of injection sites .
                              polyester has a strong smell when sanded, epoxy does not

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                              • #30
                                Re: Converting this small wooden boat into a casual sailobr />
                                That's a good idea too. One thing I'll need to figure out is how dirty the interstitial cavity is (betweent he laminations). Maybe I can blow some air and flush it with denature alcohol Does it make sense to send screws with washers through the hull and into a temporary backing blocks of wood to provide the clamping force, then come back with thickened epoxy to fill the little holes?

                                Presumably these pieces delaminating are indications of further problems down the road... is there any preventative work I can do in this region while I'm in repair mode? All the cracks I've seen are confined 2-3 feet from the bow.

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