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Thread: Purchasing a boat in Mexico

  1. #1
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    Default Purchasing a boat in Mexico

    Does this sound like there are hidden taxes or fees of some sort they are convemiently not mentioning? Anyone familiar with purchasing a boat in Mexico then bringing it here?

    This is the basic procedure that we use here in Mexico to transfer ownership of Vessels. Please let me know if you have any questions.

    First an offer has to be made to purchase the boat. This offer can be made sight unseen pending personal inspection of the boat. Also it is usually written in subject to Sea Trial and Survey. The Seller has to accept the offer or give a counter offer. Once basic acceptance of price and terms is made between the two parties then the Visual Inspection, Sea Trial and Survey can proceed. The Sea Trial usually is first before the survey if the vessel is in the water. If the vessel is stored on the hard the buyer has the option of doing the survey first.

    When those are completed then the deal is either accepted or renegotiated if a problem is found or you can withdrawal your offer. Normally before the Survey and Sea Trial a Deposit is made of at least 10% and wired to an escrow company. This is refundable if the deal does not proceed. After the Survey and Sea Trial and the final acceptance is signed then we transfer the rest of the paperwork to an escrow Company to protect all parties. The money is held in trust till the legal paperwork is completed by both parties. The buyer then wires the balance to the title and escrow company. Once all legal paperwork is completed then the title or Documentation is transferred, a Bill of Sale is given and the Money is deposited in the sellers account by the escrow company.

    The Seller is responsible for the commission to the brokerage and the slip rent or storage till time of close. A full accounting by the escrow company is given and agreed upon by both parties before the close of escrow. The buyer is responsible for the Haul out if needed, survey and closing costs. The slip rent or storage to the buyer starts the day the deal closes.
    After you receive your New Documentation or Registration then the old paperwork from Mexico with the previous owners must be turned in and you must apply for a new Temporary Import Permit for the boat in your name in Mexico. This is done as an offshore delivery which we will explain in depth at a later date. It must be an offshore delivery as it is technically illegal to Buy and Sell a foreign registered boat in Mexico so transfer must be made offshore and no money changes hands in Mexico.
    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn't do, than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover." - Mark Twain

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    Default Re: Purchasing a boat in Mexico

    It seems a bit complex. I would pass on the deal.

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    Default Re: Purchasing a boat in Mexico

    and you'll never see your escrow again.....no guarantees that the paperwork is real...and then you must pay import duties etc on the boat bringing it into the united states.....and it could be stolen and paperwork created for it offshore.
    Wakan Tanka Kici Un
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    Fighting Illegal immigration since 1492....
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    Default Re: Purchasing a boat in Mexico

    Its a washington boat that was sailed down there years ago. Its changed hands once in Mexico already. Not sure about current registration. Its in LaPaz...
    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn't do, than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover." - Mark Twain

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    Default Re: Purchasing a boat in Mexico

    Its on the hard now and appears to need lots of work. The owner went back up to San Diego to go back to grad school. Could probably be gotten for real cheap. Hard part is getting it back here...easiest to go out to Hawaii and then up this way I guess.







    http://www.yachtworld.com/core/listi...oat_id=1875288
    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn't do, than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover." - Mark Twain

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    Default Re: Purchasing a boat in Mexico

    They said they use an escrow company located in WA state to hold all moneys and transfer the title so they can register it for you where ever you wish, WA, CA, USCG, Canada.

    Still makes me nervous though...what if they wont let the boat leave Mexico for some reason..
    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn't do, than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover." - Mark Twain

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    Default Re: Purchasing a boat in Mexico

    TimH ---

    It appears that everyone is telling you it is a bad idea. Yet you still want the boat.

    So pay your money and take your chances.

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    Default Re: Purchasing a boat in Mexico

    Quote Originally Posted by George Roberts View Post
    TimH ---

    It appears that everyone is telling you it is a bad idea. Yet you still want the boat.

    So pay your money and take your chances.
    Well I have been watching this boat for years.
    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn't do, than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover." - Mark Twain

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    Default Re: Purchasing a boat in Mexico







    I wonder if this rudder will swell up and be fine on its own.
    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn't do, than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover." - Mark Twain

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    Default Re: Purchasing a boat in Mexico

    That quote at the top of this page is such a ridiculous thing.
    Just get the CF number and then call the owner. Thats all.
    You have to ask the owner if there are fees owed on the boat.
    If it is a US documented boat and you get a bunch of extortion type crap just call the US consulate.
    This happens to boats all the time.
    You better get to it before it is stripped of all the gear.


    Many boats stuck in Panama too.
    Toys abandoned and no way to save them.
    Last edited by donald branscom; 07-13-2009 at 04:08 PM.
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    Default Re: Purchasing a boat in Mexico

    Quote Originally Posted by Gary E View Post
    So it's out of the water now??
    If so, its either going to be a FREE boat, or it's going to be FIREWOOD
    Unless you speak the local language and can hire and supervize a local repair crew, NOBODY is EVER going to float that boat again... thus, my bet would be FIREWOOD
    People buy and sell boats in Mexico all the time. I once used a crew from Mexico to load a boat for me in Tucson..... it was all done over the phone and worked out fine.

    PS....this boat is glass, it will float just fine

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    Default Re: Purchasing a boat in Mexico

    Quote Originally Posted by GWB View Post
    PS....this boat is glass, it will float just fine
    Shhh.
    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn't do, than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover." - Mark Twain

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    Default Re: Purchasing a boat in Mexico

    Quote Originally Posted by TimH View Post
    Shhh.
    Go for it...but lowball the offer. If the boat is at Marina San Carlos they used to run a hydraulic trailor to a Tucson crane yard. The boat can then be loaded onto a regular over the road trailer for transport to your destination

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    Default Re: Purchasing a boat in Mexico

    Trying to find out if the boat is USCG registered or not. Apparently that make a big difference in getting it back to the country (the cost of it anyway). The owner had told the broker it was a registered vessel, but it has WN numbers on the bow.
    The boat has a current Mexican Temporary Import Permit. There are no fees to return a US documented vessel back to the good ol USA, but if you are refering to shipping or trucking costs that is a different story. Marina Seca San Carlos is now trucking boats to the US again. I am not sure if it can be done from Marina Seca Guaymas (which is where the boat is now).
    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn't do, than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover." - Mark Twain

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    Default Re: Purchasing a boat in Mexico

    Quote Originally Posted by Gary E View Post
    So it's glass... glass covered wood? or solid glass? does not matter...
    Its an Ingrid 38 Gary.
    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn't do, than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover." - Mark Twain

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    Default Re: Purchasing a boat in Mexico

    Quote Originally Posted by Gary E View Post
    So ??
    splain that to us who've never heard of it
    You really are showing your ignorance arent you....
    Why add to the thread if you don't have a clue about what is being discussed?

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    Default Re: Purchasing a boat in Mexico

    Quote Originally Posted by TimH View Post
    Trying to find out if the boat is USCG registered or not. Apparently that make a big difference in getting it back to the country (the cost of it anyway). The owner had told the broker it was a registered vessel, but it has WN numbers on the bow.
    The boat has a current Mexican Temporary Import Permit. There are no fees to return a US documented vessel back to the good ol USA, but if you are refering to shipping or trucking costs that is a different story. Marina Seca San Carlos is now trucking boats to the US again. I am not sure if it can be done from Marina Seca Guaymas (which is where the boat is now).
    If you have the documentation number you can do a search to see if its current.

    edit: Marina Seca Guaymas is about 20 miles from Marina San Carlos
    Last edited by GWB; 07-14-2009 at 10:09 AM. Reason: Add info

  18. #18
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    Default Re: Purchasing a boat in Mexico

    Quote Originally Posted by Gary E View Post
    So ??
    splain that to us who've never heard of it

    (reprinted from old Blue Water Boats literature)
    Ingrid Design: The "Ingrid is a William Atkin adaptation of the famous Colin Archer "Redningskoite" boats.
    Double-ended boats are decendants of the Viking ship. In the late 19th century, Colin Archer, a Scotch naval architect living in Norway, achieved considerable fame for his refinement of double-ended sailboats. His designs won world recongnition for their heavy-weather characteristics.
    In 1934 William Atkin, an American naval architect, took the classic lines of the "Redningskoite" and produced several sizes of this lovely vessel. Ingrid is the 38' model and varies only slightly form the original Archer design. For example Atkin gave the Ingrid hull a finer entry for better performance.
    Ingrid Philosophy: Blue Water Boats in Washington built the Ingrid (from the mid '70s to the mid '80s) for people who wanted to sail the ocean. While not all Ingrid owners plan to take their boats on ocean passages immediately, they have the assurance that their Ingrid is ready when they are.
    The Ingrid differs from many other ocean sail-boats in that her design permits handling with only one or two person - as opposed to requiring a large crew. The boat is easily single-handed. She will deliver a softer, more stable ride making the trip not only exciting - but restful and comfortable as well. Strength and safety are primary in her construction.
    Sailing Characteristics:The Ingrid is designed with one purpose - to provide a safe and comfortable ocean journey to her crew. Ingrid is, however a very sprightly boat in her element.
    Ingrid's full keel keeps her directionally stable resisting the pressures of waves and wind to twist her. If the sails are balanced, the course will remain true even without a hand on the helm.
    The bow has a fine entry. When the Ingrid comes down off a wave crest into a trough there is no tooth-jarring "bang"! Instead, she makes a gentle "whooshing" sound. The water acts like a giant shock absorber and stops the downward motion (like catching an egg). Even the fo'c'sle berth is comfortable at sea!
    Ample floatation in both the bow and stern quarters keep her ends dry. They lift easily with the waves.
    Ballast in the Ingrid is spread out from extreme stern position to the bob-stay iron in the bow. This long moment of force acts like a pole, rising and falling on a horizontal plane (as opposed to the pitching motion so common in the fin-keel sailboats)
    Blue Water Boats, Inc.: Founded in 1971 by James Musser, a Seattle sailor whose plan was to build an Ingrid and embark on a Pacific Ocean cruise. He constructed his "plug" from the original William Atkin plan, then the mold, and made his Ingrid hull. Several people who saw his completed project asked for similar hulls from the mold and this led to the formation of Blue Water Boats.
    In 1973 the firm was incorporated, Jerry Husted, an experienced Puget Sound sailor, became the equal partner. Shortly thereafter, Musser and his wife left on their long-awaited cruise aboard their Ingrid "Sandaldust".
    In July, 1974, Husted purchased the balance of the shares of teh company. He himself sailed aboard an Ingrid from Honolulu to Seattle - gaining additional insight into Ingrid's characteristics.
    My records are not complete and from my best estimates and the documents I have at hand, I estimate that production of the Ingrid continued until about 1985 and about 150 to 175 hulls were produced. At about this time the molds and patterns were sold. They are currently stored in Graham, WA. (Jerry Husted switched his production operation to the Nordic Tug.)
    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn't do, than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover." - Mark Twain

  19. #19
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    Default Re: Purchasing a boat in Mexico

    The Ingrids were built in the mid to late 70's, pretty heavy construction. I considered the purchase of one while in Iceland, some have a fiberglas deck assembly and others were built up wood.
    Wakan Tanka Kici Un
    ..a bad day sailing is a heckuva lot better than the best day at work.....
    Fighting Illegal immigration since 1492....
    Live your life so that whenever you lose, you're ahead."
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    Default Re: Purchasing a boat in Mexico

    Quote Originally Posted by Gary E View Post
    We're all not near as smart as you are....
    I for one have NEVER heard of that boat...
    what?...you think it's common and everone has??
    Actually I was referring to your input about Mexico and its people

  21. #21
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    Default Re: Purchasing a boat in Mexico

    Quote Originally Posted by paladin View Post
    some have a fiberglas deck assembly and others were built up wood.
    Exactly. What is special about this one is that it doesnt have that ugly fiberglass cabin trunk(s). It has a traditional deck and cabin trunk whish really sets it apart IMHO. I have not seen another like it. Only the first boats had owner-built decks. Shortly after begining production, Blue Water boats had a deck/cabin mold everyone used. They werent very asthetically pleasing.
    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn't do, than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover." - Mark Twain

  22. #22
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    Default Re: Purchasing a boat in Mexico

    For what its worth Tim, the Alajuela rendition of the Ingrid 38 is a very well built boat. If you are set on this design they are worth a look

    Quote Originally Posted by TimH View Post
    (reprinted from old Blue Water Boats literature)
    Ingrid Design: The "Ingrid is a William Atkin adaptation of the famous Colin Archer "Redningskoite" boats.
    Double-ended boats are decendants of the Viking ship. In the late 19th century, Colin Archer, a Scotch naval architect living in Norway, achieved considerable fame for his refinement of double-ended sailboats. His designs won world recongnition for their heavy-weather characteristics.
    In 1934 William Atkin, an American naval architect, took the classic lines of the "Redningskoite" and produced several sizes of this lovely vessel. Ingrid is the 38' model and varies only slightly form the original Archer design. For example Atkin gave the Ingrid hull a finer entry for better performance.
    Ingrid Philosophy: Blue Water Boats in Washington built the Ingrid (from the mid '70s to the mid '80s) for people who wanted to sail the ocean. While not all Ingrid owners plan to take their boats on ocean passages immediately, they have the assurance that their Ingrid is ready when they are.
    The Ingrid differs from many other ocean sail-boats in that her design permits handling with only one or two person - as opposed to requiring a large crew. The boat is easily single-handed. She will deliver a softer, more stable ride making the trip not only exciting - but restful and comfortable as well. Strength and safety are primary in her construction.
    Sailing Characteristics:The Ingrid is designed with one purpose - to provide a safe and comfortable ocean journey to her crew. Ingrid is, however a very sprightly boat in her element.
    Ingrid's full keel keeps her directionally stable resisting the pressures of waves and wind to twist her. If the sails are balanced, the course will remain true even without a hand on the helm.
    The bow has a fine entry. When the Ingrid comes down off a wave crest into a trough there is no tooth-jarring "bang"! Instead, she makes a gentle "whooshing" sound. The water acts like a giant shock absorber and stops the downward motion (like catching an egg). Even the fo'c'sle berth is comfortable at sea!
    Ample floatation in both the bow and stern quarters keep her ends dry. They lift easily with the waves.
    Ballast in the Ingrid is spread out from extreme stern position to the bob-stay iron in the bow. This long moment of force acts like a pole, rising and falling on a horizontal plane (as opposed to the pitching motion so common in the fin-keel sailboats)
    Blue Water Boats, Inc.: Founded in 1971 by James Musser, a Seattle sailor whose plan was to build an Ingrid and embark on a Pacific Ocean cruise. He constructed his "plug" from the original William Atkin plan, then the mold, and made his Ingrid hull. Several people who saw his completed project asked for similar hulls from the mold and this led to the formation of Blue Water Boats.
    In 1973 the firm was incorporated, Jerry Husted, an experienced Puget Sound sailor, became the equal partner. Shortly thereafter, Musser and his wife left on their long-awaited cruise aboard their Ingrid "Sandaldust".
    In July, 1974, Husted purchased the balance of the shares of teh company. He himself sailed aboard an Ingrid from Honolulu to Seattle - gaining additional insight into Ingrid's characteristics.
    My records are not complete and from my best estimates and the documents I have at hand, I estimate that production of the Ingrid continued until about 1985 and about 150 to 175 hulls were produced. At about this time the molds and patterns were sold. They are currently stored in Graham, WA. (Jerry Husted switched his production operation to the Nordic Tug.)

  23. #23
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    Default Re: Purchasing a boat in Mexico

    Ingrid
    A 37' 6" Colin Archer Type Double-Ended Ketch
    By William Atkin
    A Colin Archer Type Double-Ender Ingrid is a big boat. She has all the characteristics usually associated with seagoing ability. She is the kind of boat that behaves in rough water. She can be depended upon to sail herself. She is ableness personified. And equal to any situation. Ingrid is the reply to ever so many requests for an enlargement of the double-end Thistle, whose plans appeared several months ago. And for a ketch-rigged auxiliary. There has been retained in Ingrid practically the same beam as that of Thistle. The draft, however, has been increased to 5 feet 6 inches. Ingrid, then, is 37 feet 6 inches in overall length; 30 feet on the water line; 11 feet 4 inches beam; and 5 feet 6 inches draft. Her displacement is 25,000 pounds. There is 9,000 pounds of iron on her keel with 3,000 pounds inside ballast. The sail area is 816 square feet. The cabin is large. Your man of six-foot height can walk through upright, and this should please many. Personally I feel that headroom is the least important feature of a small yacht's design. However, we all do not think alike in this respect. In a boat of Ingrid's length heights do not have to be abnormal in order to get full headroom. The lines show a genuine redningskoite -- life boat of the North Sea. As nearly perfect in form as any boat can be. It may be well to mention that man has never built any kind of vessel that will ride out any kind of sea. The sea is a tremendous thing. It smiles today; tomorrow scolds! All of which holds true of water anywhere -- lake, river, harbor, bay or pond. Men who find a livelihood by working the sea know this -- man, child and wife. Plans for Ingrid are $275
    Study Plans are available for $15
    (Refunded when full plans are purchased)
    Please Use Our PRINT-OUT ORDER FORM To Request Boat Plans
    PHOTOS OF INGRID
    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn't do, than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover." - Mark Twain

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    Default Re: Purchasing a boat in Mexico

    Just found out the owner is $1500 plus interest behind on his storage fees.
    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn't do, than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover." - Mark Twain

  25. #25
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    Default Re: Purchasing a boat in Mexico

    I know the boat was listed at 35k several years ago when the current owner purchased it. Is there a way to find out what he actually paid for it?
    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn't do, than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover." - Mark Twain

  26. #26
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    Default Re: Purchasing a boat in Mexico

    Wouldn't it show up on the documentation...if he ever transferred it? Ask for proof of ownership/registration papers etc........
    Wakan Tanka Kici Un
    ..a bad day sailing is a heckuva lot better than the best day at work.....
    Fighting Illegal immigration since 1492....
    Live your life so that whenever you lose, you're ahead."
    "If you live life right, death is a joke as far as fear is concerned."

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    Default Re: Purchasing a boat in Mexico

    you could buy a boat privately with a lot less hassle find out about Americas import duty and legalities but definitely cheaper to buy in Mexico than US.
    I know of a Australian who buys boats in Indonesia at half the price of Australia so going abroad can save huge bucks.

  28. #28
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    Default Re: Purchasing a boat in Mexico

    we shall see.
    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn't do, than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover." - Mark Twain

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    Default Re: Purchasing a boat in Mexico

    I do have some experiance with this. The laws may have changed some, but this is how it used to work. Most importantly, It is illeagel to sell a foregin flagged vessel in MX. As in you must pay import duties formally import the vessel into the country then you can sell it. The brokers in MX get around this by doing the paperwork outside of the country and taking the boat offshore for exchange of ownership, changing the name etc. Kind of a don't ask don't tell. The Mexican port captians and officials in general are extremely accomidating to foreign pleasure boats. You play by the rules etc they let things be. If you do a search on yachtworld you will see quite a few US boats for sale on the west coast of MX. These are through legitimate brokerages. When we bought our new boat we sold or old one in PV. We looked at a few new ones there too The whole process was worry free. The broker actually used the same escrow and title company that I used to buy it 6 years earlier in WA state. If it was registered in WA state you should be able to get a title or records of it through the DMV. If you want I can put you in touch with the broker I used in PV who has a partner in San Carlos. If it has been sitting on the hard in San Carlos for very long it may have some issues as it gets brutal hot there in the summer.

    Jake

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    Default Re: Purchasing a boat in Mexico

    I was wondering what effect that kind of heat would have. The escrow company they use is a local one - Pacific Maritime Title Co.
    I guess the boat is USCG registered.

    The biggest problem I see is the logistics of getting the boat ready for sea when its there and I am here. And how expensive are supplies down there? Even if you can get a great deal on the boat how much will it cost in the end? And how much headache?
    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn't do, than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover." - Mark Twain

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    Default Re: Purchasing a boat in Mexico

    Quote Originally Posted by TimH View Post
    I was wondering what effect that kind of heat would have. The escrow company they use is a local one - Pacific Maritime Title Co.
    I guess the boat is USCG registered.

    The biggest problem I see is the logistics of getting the boat ready for sea when its there and I am here. And how expensive are supplies down there? Even if you can get a great deal on the boat how much will it cost in the end? And how much headache?
    Need a crew ?

    Lovely boat. I would imagine we could hire some semi skilled workers and materials would be less expensive and have her ready in about the time we would need to leave. ( Due to some disagreement with me and some local father of some girl I may or may not have shared some tequila and sunsets with )

    When should I pack ?
    This post is temporary and my disappear at the discretion of the managment

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    Default Re: Purchasing a boat in Mexico

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe ( Cold Spring on Hudson ) View Post
    Need a crew ?

    Lovely boat. I would imagine we could hire some semi skilled workers and materials would be less expensive and have her ready in about the time we would need to leave. ( Due to some disagreement with me and some local father of some girl I may or may not have shared some tequila and sunsets with )

    When should I pack ?
    Hell... one trip north from Mexico with the right er.... cargo and you'd probably have enough money to see the world on your new boat.
    Last edited by Paul Pless; 08-05-2009 at 10:23 AM.

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    Default Re: Purchasing a boat in Mexico

    Quote Originally Posted by TimH View Post
    I was wondering what effect that kind of heat would have. The escrow company they use is a local one - Pacific Maritime Title Co.
    I guess the boat is USCG registered.

    The biggest problem I see is the logistics of getting the boat ready for sea when its there and I am here. And how expensive are supplies down there? Even if you can get a great deal on the boat how much will it cost in the end? And how much headache?
    Ah now youre asking the questions. It will be a major headache and cost way way more than you expected...at a point you will realise that you have made a major mistake and frantically consider your options only to realise that if you stop you will lose everything including your shorts.

    Ask me how I know

    If you see it through it will be satisfying and rewarding.....

  34. #34
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Victoria, BC
    Posts
    10,445

    Default Re: Purchasing a boat in Mexico

    San Carlos! Hauled out there. Brutal hot in MAY, never mind the summer. ("The fans, Dave....the fans! Install the fans NOW!!!!!!!")

    Tim: re your "The biggest problem I see is the logistics of getting the boat ready for sea when its there and I am here.". Friends also hauled out there for the off season; returned to do own prep/work necessary to refloat for the next season/leg of the adventure. You will have to decide if you are doing the work, or paying locals to do the work. From my vague recollections, the work won't cost you a lot less there.

    Options: you take time off and go do the work yourself; pay them to do it in your absence (issue - you can't check their work); truck the boat to someone you trust to do the work (San Diego?); or, truck it home and you do the work as you can and get her ready to go again.

    What's your long term goal for you/this boat?
    Deb

  35. #35
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Whidbey Island
    Posts
    12,857

    Default Re: Purchasing a boat in Mexico

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Pless View Post
    Hell... one trip north from Mexico with the right er.... cargo and you'd probably have enough money to see the world on your new boat.
    Now THERES an idea

    It would be the adventure of a lifetime for me...or maybe just the start of one

    I work remotely so I might be able to stay down there for a few months and get the boat ready. The owner said the engine ran when the boat was in the water but he cant "guarantee the condition of any systems". The engine would be real important if I were to try and bash back up the coast, but most people recommend a long tack out to Hawaii and then up north from there.

    Sure is a sweet looking boat.
    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn't do, than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover." - Mark Twain

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