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Thread: bronze polishing

  1. #36
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    Default Re: bronze polishing

    Okay, okay... I've used Neverdull out of habit and because it worked. I'll find some Wright's Copper Polish and become a convert. LOL

    See... I DID look it up!


  2. #37
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    Default Re: bronze polishing

    You're gonna love it, and you'll wonder where it's been all your life!

  3. #38
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    Default Re: bronze polishing

    Wow , I can't believe all the postings about polishing metals! This is great! I thought I was the only "fool" to try keeping my brass and bronze somewhat polished. I actually do have it easier because I'm located on Lake Ontario (fresh water), but the rain and Lake spray do tarnish it badly. The goal for me is to polish well for shows and events only, with periodic polishings every week or so. In that way, it is not that difficult to do. It takes about 1/2 hour to do a quick light polish, and maybe double that for a show finish. There is nothing wrong with polishing bronze, it is simply a matter of labor. To me it has a very beautiful color, not like copper or brass....something in between. My winches are also bronze, and they look fantastic, I get comments every day. I have made covers for some larger items like the cowl vents and winches, that does help, and may prevent theft.

  4. #39
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    Default Re: bronze polishing

    According to Giffy Hull, wiping the polished bronze or brass with Thompson's waterseal is supposed to prolong the shine. I will let you know because I just spent about three hours per winch bringing them back to a shine and they began to tarnish before my eyes. The bronze winches look great when all shined up but keeping that way takes daily polishing. You need a kid on board to do this stuff.

  5. #40
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    Default Re: bronze polishing

    To keep it from turning green use beeswax in toluol solution.

    From :The Artist Handbook by Ralph Mayer
    I love the smell of fresh cut plywood in the morning.

  6. #41
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    Default Re: bronze polishing

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Cleek View Post
    No, it's just that you don't polish bronze because it won't stay polished long enough to make it worth the effort and it looks good unpolished. It's harder to polish than brass, too.

    This guy is made out of bronze. For many decades, he's sat in the courtyard at the Palace of the Legion of Honor in San Francisco which stands on a bluff above the Golden Gate. This is about the foggiest, windyiest, saltiest environment arouind. In fact, it's no different than being on a boat.



    This is what bronze looks like when you leave it to weather.


    They don't polish him. He's not coated with lacquer. Just bare bronze in the marine environment. In fact, I expect if you showed up with a can of polish and tried to polish him, the museum guards would arrest you for vandalism!
    Sculptors use sculptors wax over the metal which melts at about 1000║ F
    I know I have a Masters degree in sculpture. There are other long lasting patinas as well. But all sculptures require some care.
    The worst vandalism and the hardest to deal with is _______ sorry if I wrote it someone will use it.
    I love the smell of fresh cut plywood in the morning.

  7. #42
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    Default Re: bronze polishing

    You could try a titanium nitride coating. It's used on high end motorcycle fork sliders. Don't know about the cost.
    Here's a link to one supplier.
    http://www.brycoat.com/pvd-tin.html

  8. #43
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    Default Re: bronze polishing

    Quote Originally Posted by Lew Barrett View Post
    I am Jay's choir boy on this topic.
    Can I join the chorus? I'm a big fan of Wright's copper polish and brass polish after reading about it from Jay and Lew.

    Psst...I get mine at Lund's grocery store...
    Last edited by C. Ross; 08-24-2009 at 09:48 PM.

  9. #44
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    Default Re: bronze polishing

    Pleasure to have you, Cris. Tenor or basso?

  10. #45
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    Default Re: bronze polishing

    Tenor if you please.

    I have bronze stanchions aft that are brown and unpolished and look nice with buff weather curtains. They'd look odd polished (and a pain to maintain).

    But I'm a sucker for polishing the bronze and brass portholes and bronze stem band. The chrome can fend for itself. I also use Wright's on the stainless steel surfaces in the galley with nice results.

  11. #46
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    Default Re: bronze polishing

    I hate polishing bronze enough that I had my Wilcox 'Winner' head chromed.

  12. #47
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    Default Re: bronze polishing

    Quote Originally Posted by Lew Barrett View Post
    I am Jay's choir boy on this topic. Not only do I have a deep stash of Wright's, I "generously" offer my container to good friends when they need polish at boat shows. They see me wiping it on and wiping it off and are astounded at the ease with which Wright's goes about it's business. I won't blow Jay's cover in respect to where you might find this miracle tonic, but I will provide a hint: look in the most obvious places that carry cleaning products. Wrights is not a chandlery item.

    I don't know about Behr varnish or Jeffries, but based on my experiences with Wright's one has to be very careful when arguing with Jay about "product."
    This stuff is the real deal.
    This stuff truly is amazing - based on the advice from Jay & Lew I asked my sister-in-law who lives in Hawaii to send me some (its not available in NZ or Aust) - parcel arrived today - 4 pots & YES IT DOES WORK. As some said b4 "why did I not know about this b4". I hope there are no other wonder products out there that you forumites are keeping quiet about???

    "Old boats are like teenage girlfriends: there is a certain urgency to their needs & one neglects them at one's peril"


  13. #48
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    Default Re: bronze polishing

    polished, brass ,bronze,and copper looks well on a steam boat and patinated looks well on a sail boat ,one looks hard work and the other looks restfull.

  14. #49
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    Default Re: bronze polishing

    Mostly, because I am lazy I wouldn’t polish either. Unless as mentioned by “bruce w” in post #49 it is a steam boat, then of course everything needs to gleam.

    In my callow youth when I hung around the marina on weekends I quickly learned the life cycle of polished brass. A person-of-wealth would buy a really-nice-boat. Every piece of brass except the clock and compass would be painted white. This of course was unacceptable! Good money was paid for this boat the brass must be seen. Said wealthy person would hire the aforementioned callow youth to remove all of the paint and polish up that brass. Which of course would soon tarnish resulting in rally ugly green gunk getting on summer dress of wife/daughter of person-of-wealth. After a couple of rounds of re-polishing the brass a proclamation would be made “we shall put varathane on all of the brass”. Callow youth would point out that (a) it would look tacky and not present the “image” that comes from the soft glow of real polished brass and (b) when it gets scratched or worn the oxidation will still occur but now be even harder to keep looking nice. Then youth would clean and degrease everything and cover it with varathane, which of course made all that nice brass look like cheap plastic. Eventually when person-of-wealth got tired of very expensive boat looking like it was outfitted with cheap scratched shower curtain rods callow youth would clean and degrease everything and paint it white again, unless of course person-of-wealth was willing to kick out some real cash and have the youth cover everything possible with fancy decorative rope work. Callow youth of course encourage this and pointed out many examples of his fine work on other boats. Eventually after a couple of seasons person-of-wealth would realize that due to really-nice-boat he was no longer a person-of-wealth and boat would be sold. New owner seeing that all of the brass was painted white would decide that this was unacceptable . . .

    I am guessing that this scenario has played itself out forever in every yacht basin in the world.

    Donald Branscom post #42

    “Sculptors use sculptors wax over the metal which melts at about 1000║ F
    I know I have a Masters degree in sculpture.”
    Donald, no Masters degree here, but I have done some sculpture and a lot of jewelry work. Where do you get wax that melts at 1000║ F? And how do you apply it without damaging the finer details of your work?
    If there's more water on the outside than in, she's afloat.

  15. #50
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    Default Re: bronze polishing

    Application of Tung oil can also prolong the shine on brass. My mother used to use it on her door knockers. It worked..

  16. #51
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    Default Re: bronze polishing

    Adding any kind of coating to polished brass or bronze makes repolishing, at a later date, a bitch. One must first remove the coating and then the corrosion that has built up under it. Brass will even discolor under clear powder coating.
    And that, my friends, is really a bitch to remove!
    Jay

  17. #52
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    Default Re: bronze polishing

    Follow-up:
    For things that don't get too much wear (cowl vents, fairleads, cleats, window frames, navigation lights, stanchion socket, ...), I finally tried gold-plating (Spa Plating at
    http://www.goldn.co.uk/about_us.htm) and after a couple of months, I can say so far so good.

    It also has the advantage that all the plated items now have the same golden color and the Spa Plating kit also allows to dechrome, so I don't go to the local plating shop anymore.

    For the winches, after applying a fine layer of oil, I wrap them in kitchen cellophane film and my wife knitted a cover.

    Anyway, if over time I find out it's too much trouble, I'll let the bronze patina develop.

    Thank you again for all the advices.
    Patrick.






  18. #53
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    Default Re: bronze polishing

    Whaoo ! CÓ c'est de la finition !
    Dans quel port est ton bateau que je vienne y jeter un coup d'oeil la prochaine fois que je passe vers chez toi ?
    Gerard.
    SCHOONER FOR EVER, GOELETTE A PERPETE

    http://www.goelette-anthea.fr

  19. #54

    Default Re: bronze polishing

    Winch cozies! And, wow, very tidy boat! That original interior: Stripes much!?!

    Say, I have a question on something that was mentioned early on in this thread. It was said that bronze turns brown, and only brass turns green.

    I've got some husky bronze fittings that do have the greenish patina on them, but I'm nearly sure they are bronze (early 1960s beefy cleats, Wilcox Crittenden deck fittings and seaocks, etc.)

    I had always thought that bronze tended to turn more brown in freshwater environments, and more green in saltwater environments.

    So this moved me to ask about it.

    Pen

  20. #55
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    Thumbs up Wright's Copper Cream


  21. #56
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    Default Re: bronze polishing

    PCAZELES - What kind of varnish are you using on that fine vessel with gold plated bronze?
    Last edited by John P Lebens; 11-29-2009 at 01:40 PM.

  22. #57
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    Default Re: bronze polishing

    Here is some freshly polished bronze from our vessel Suellen. The three part piece is a magnificant bronze nose on the bow.



    We had it done at a place in Portland called "Metal Polishing by Timothy, Inc." They have a big operation but were happy to do these pieces. I also had some door edges and window surrounds polished, but not in the photo. Tim recommended I use "Simichrome" polish. A sample packet is in the photo. I plan to compare the Simichrome with Wright's Copper Cream as I continue this project.

    I do not plan to coat these pieces with anything and they will gradually fade to a less brilliant color. I wanted to start fresh with them because they are visually prominent on the vessel. They originally showed the scars of many years of polishing attempts and sloppy varnishing. Even the photos don't do these pieces justice. They look like uniform, shiny gold.

  23. #58
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    Default Re: bronze polishing


    Say, this is " The thinker", or at least a replica of it, My favourite sculpture since I was a lad, by Rodin, I believe. The way this guy sits is just fascinating to me for some reason.
    ..don't judge a man till you've walked a mile in his shoes..

  24. #59
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    Default Re: bronze polishing

    Preliminary test results:*

    The Wrights Copper Polish seems to actually melt away oxidization on brass and bronze. Follow the unusual instructions involving a hot water rinse and wash and clean-up with a dry rag. It is super effective stuff. it brings out a reasonable shine very quickly. BUT, it does not seem to bring the surface to a high gloss.

    The Simichrome requires rubbing to clear oxidization and it is much slower to work through heavily oxidized surfaces than the Wrights. HOWEVER, I think because the Simichrone contains abrasives, it is more capable than Wrights of creating a brilliant shine. I have heard you should not use Simichome on plated materials, because it does remove a bit of surface metal.

    Pending further research,* I think a good plan is to first use Wrights for basic cleaning of oxidization and creating a clean and satin shiny surface.

    Then apply the Simichrome and rub a little to bring up the bright, glossy aspects of the metal.

    *"research" included a very quick application of Wrights to a brass John Hastie wheel that has been exposed the the outdoor elements for at least a year. The Wright's brought up the brass shine within seconds of application. Most of the work was in applying and removing the polish. The Simichrome did almost nothing to the original oxidization compared with the Wrights. Seeing little result, I quickly gave up on the Simichrome. This morning I tried the Simichrome again on the already Wright polished surface and was impressed with the result. It required some rubbing, but brought the shine up to a much higher gloss. A second application of the Wrights - with the requisite rubbing, resulted in a satin gloss - not nearly as brilliant as the Simichrome.

    Conclusions:

    Wrights followed by Simichrome = brilliant shine
    Simichome only = too much work
    Wrights only = satin shine

  25. #60
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    Thumbs up Re: bronze polishing

    Nice summary John, thanks.

  26. #61
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    Default Re: bronze polishing

    Quote Originally Posted by John P Lebens View Post
    PCAZELES - What kind of varnish are you using on that fine vessel with gold plated bronze?
    I use Schooner from Interlux (Rebecca Wittman's brightwork companion) on the hull.

    For almost the complete brightwork, I went to bare wood and I used Benar from Jotun. It's an alkyd oil which takes time to dry but after few weeks under the sun, no one could tell whether it's varnish or alkyd oil, it's really glossy (some areas are mixed). It seems to hold better under the sun than varnish, doesn't require so many layers (4 or 5 in my case instead of 12) and mostly, is much easier to repair.

    The first year I used for my mast, I liked it and went for it for the brightwork this year.

    Patrick.

  27. #62
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    Default Re: bronze polishing

    To keep it from turning green use beeswax in toluol solution.

    From :The Artist Handbook by Ralph Mayebr />
    There is NO polish that will last very long.
    Buy or borrow this book from the library .
    I love the smell of fresh cut plywood in the morning.

  28. #63
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    Default Re: bronze polishing

    I am afraid to begin any polishing of any bits for fear of never finding an end to it.








    ..don't judge a man till you've walked a mile in his shoes..

  29. #64
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    Default Re: bronze polishing

    Right John, that's how it is. Wrights is what I'd call a stripper, not a true polish. But stripped is usually good enough for me, since there is only one thing more thankless than endless brightwork repair, and that's bronze polishing.

    By the way, Simichrome's been around seemingly forever; I used to use it on my motorcycles back in the 60s. Flitz works about the same as Simichrome, as do most of the "polishes." But nothing strips heavy tarnish and verdigris from brass, copper, bronze, chrome or even silverware, as fast as Wrights does. There is simply no substitute. It must be rinsed off thoroughly though...and I do mean thoroughly. Without serious rinsing, the stripped pieces turn streaky and ugly in the first rain or mist.

    Another deep bow in the direction of Pt. Townsend (and Jay Greer) for the (truly selfless) promotion of this miracle elixer!

  30. #65

    Default Re: bronze polishing

    I polish my stuff, but I remove it, and use a power buffer with compound. I am pretty good at polishing stuff now, even basic castings, but it takes a lot of different bobs, compounds, wheels and tools to do a complete job. I still use Solvol Autosol, which I find works well on almost everything. but.... I am in freshwater... so it makes a huge difference.
    Last edited by Peter Malcolm Jardine; 12-28-2009 at 03:56 PM.
    Wooden boats are like shingles, recurring, and often painful.

  31. #66
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    Default Re: bronze polishing

    Old trick to remove the grease left behind by the polish is to wipe over with a talc-filled cloth before lacquering. I tried baby powder, that works too and the perfume goes away after a while ...

  32. #67

    Default Re: bronze polishing

    some time ago, i meet a crew on a classic yacht who tell me one day he use W40 spray on polished bronze to keep them shiny ?? i never try myself?? perhaps working?
    cheer's
    bertho

  33. #68
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    Default Re: bronze polishing

    Hello, I know I am extremely late to help you, but for anyone else who may be reading here is what I did. I went and purchased a drill, a hookit pad, and sand paper pads ranging from 220, 400, 800, 1500, 3000, 5000 grit sand paper. Then I polished with Gord's Aluminum polish. Really made my bronze shine. I actually found out about this technique from this video. Best of luck on your Bronze polishing, and I hope you have a wonderful day.

  34. #69
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    Default Re: bronze polishing

    Perhaps some of you might remember Bennet's Brilliant Shine metal polish. It came in a keen looking pint can that was red with black Victorian Style copy imprinted on it along with a picture of the inventor of the polish in a four in hand tie and a handle bar mustache. The can itself was a work of Victorian art and was, in itself, worth the price of the product which, was capable of putting a blazingly bright polish on a variety of metals. The most impressive results were when it was used on brass or bronze! Mind you, this polish was not capable of removing heavy corrosion. But, if the binnacle or bell needed a quick shine after the previous day's sail and after the morning wash down and deck scrubbing, Bennet's was the polish to use. Sadly, the product and the nostalgic can it came in are things of the past but, I know the formula! So, if you want the best polish to restore a shine, that is only a day or three, down in the brillance scale here is the secret formula to the best bright shine short of using red rouge and a buffing wheel!

    This polish was made of two simple components, Diatomaceous Earth and Naptha. Simply mix the two by first taking a half cup, or less, of diatomaceous earth and adding naptha to it while stiring the mix until it is the constancy of light cream. The amount of creaminess is a matter of choice for the user. Using a rag made of muslin, flannel or T shirt material, add a bit of polish to the rag and rub till the shine comes up. Because you are using naptha the liquid will evaporate fast and leave the powder on the surface to then be wiped off with a clean rag. Of course naptha is now difficult to find but it is actually used for lighter fluid so, if it is hard to find Naptha, use lighter fluid. Wear gloves and use the polish outside and away from any flames. Store the polish in a screw top can for the next time it is needed. A pint works well as it is easy to shake before using this amazing, blazing shine producer!
    Jay
    Last edited by Jay Greer; 02-08-2019 at 07:08 PM.

  35. #70
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    Default Re: bronze polishing

    Coleman Camp Fuel is "Naptha"... You can safely use it as a solvent on most finishes.

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