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Thread: L. Francis h.

  1. #71
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    Default Re: L. Francis h.

    This is a bit of second-hand history about one of LFH's most famous designs, the "Bounty," which some people consider to be his most beautiful designs. She's a 57' ketch built by the Quincy Adams yard.
    I got this story from O. Lie-Nielsen, who I worked for when I first came to Maine. "Lee," as he was known, had worked for LFH, according to Lee he visited yards that were building LFH boats, and checked on construction.
    Later he started a "Lee's Boatshop" in Rockland Maine, where he built a number of boats, including the blown-up version of Bounty/ticonderoga called "White Hawk," which at the time was I think the largest cold-molded hull in existence. In "Sensible Cruising Designs" there's a picture of several Rozinante's under construction. I'm pretty sure that picture was taken at Lee's.
    Anyway. By the 1960's "Bounty" was getting tired, leaking, and the decision was made to take her rig, fittings, interior, and ballast out, and have a new hull built. I think the hull was built in Nova Scotia.
    That work was done, and that's the boat that is still sailing around called "Bounty."
    Lee had a chance to buy the old hull, and he brought her to Rockland and hauled her out at his shop. According to him, Herreshoff drove up from Marblehead and walked around the hull as she was being hauled out, and said "Goddamn Quincy Adams underfastened her. Her plank screws are all breaking."
    This turned out to be the case. She was fastened with screws too small, maybe 18's instead of 20's, and they were breaking at the plank/frame interface. So they refastened her, case a new ballast keel, interior, rig, etc, and relaunched her under the name "Poquita."
    Lee's plan had been to charter her, and he had hired a young man named Mike Anderson to work on her and then be captain. Mike had sailed around the world on the Wanderbird.
    Lee had a chance to sell "Poquita," which he did, leaving Mike Anderson in the lurch. Mike eventually bought the Maine schooner "Stephen Tabor" and then built the "Angelique," which displays the "Wanderbird's" back-of-plumb bow.
    The "Poquita" disappeared from Maine, and I have been told that she was re-named "L. Francis Herreshoff," and is now out on the west coast.

  2. #72
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    Default Re: L. Francis h.

    The "Bounty" is my all time favorite boat. Often spoken of as "A riot of curves" she is blazingly fast on a reach; yet simple to sail and, can be handled by a couple for comfortable cruising.
    I once had the priveledge of being her skipper when she was owned by film producer Roger Ridell. The boat pictured is the original "Bounty". The story that was told to me by Muriel Vaughn, Mr. Herrreshoff's secretary was that when the boat was first launced, it was not given time to "take up" but was sailed hard from the very beginning. Since it is the nature of this hull design to flex a bit in a seaway the seams spit their cotton and the boat leaked badly. So the decision was finally made ,as Seo mentions, to strip the "Bounty" of her rigging and other appurtanences, this included the deck house and install them in and on the new hull which was built as a replacement.
    As mentioned, the old boat was then given a new interior, spars and deck houses. The only mistake being that the main deck house did not have the sheer in it that Herreshoff had designed and so, to this day, looks slightly off to one who understands Herreshoff Designs. Roger re-named the boat, The L. Francis Herreshoff and gave her a black boot stripe and accent line around the inner edge of the cockpit in reverance to Mr. Herreshoff's passing. I sensed from the beginning that the boat was off her lines as most of her trim ballest had been remove and the boat floated too high as a result. Her sails were blown out and she had a maddening habit of hobby horsing, in light airs, as a result of her being out of trim. After Ridell sold the boat, she was turned into a bed and breakfast attraction for a short time, which was a decided insult to such a lovely lady. One evening, someone kicked over an electric heater in the fore peak and a devestating fire resulted that gutted the entire hull. The underwriters wrote the boat off as a total loss and she sat forlornly in her slip in Newport Harbor until she was purchased by her current owner Sean Fagen. Mr. Fagen proceeded to hire my friend Rick Brown to restore the hulk. Rick is a first class boat wright. He proceeded to reframe, where needed, replank the entire hull, above the water line and replace her entire superstructure which included all new deck beams, teak decking, cockpit and bulwarks . One thing that was not done was the replacement of the deck house that still has an awkward look. Her spars, being saved, were used again but the boat has an entire new interior, based on the original design. All in all, I would say that the "Bounty" is enjoying a very good new lease on life under the ownership of a man who loves her very much!


    Last edited by Jay Greer; 05-24-2009 at 01:08 PM.

  3. #73
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    Default Re: L. Francis h.

    I'd heard that Bounty was a Bunk & Breakfast in Southern California and suggested to my sister that she check it out on a visit there but it never happened.

  4. #74
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    Default Re: L. Francis h.

    Here is "Catriona" under working canvas.

  5. #75
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    Default Re: L. Francis h.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Greer View Post
    All in all, I would say that the "Bounty" is enjoying a very good new lease on life under the ownership of a man who loves her very much!
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OZ9uG...eature=related

  6. #76
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    Default Re: L. Francis h.

    He got paid a bundle for that one. No damage was done to the boat.
    Jay

  7. #77
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    Default Re: L. Francis h.

    Quote Originally Posted by ahp View Post
    i forgot to mention the kinner rosinante was made of fg.
    kenner

  8. #78
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    Default Re: L. Francis h.

    Terrific thread. Should get a "sticky"

  9. #79
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    Default Re: L. Francis h.

    Jay,
    I'm having trouble keeping track of the boats.
    What is "Catriona?" She looks like a Bounty/Tioga.
    You show some pictures of a boat called "Bounty." Is that the "Original" Bounty, or the Bounty/Poquita/L. Francis Herreshoff?
    If it's the original, where is she these days?
    Why do people do that business of tooling the seam compound so that the boat has stripes?

  10. #80
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    Default Re: L. Francis h.

    seo, if Jay will indulge me, I can answer your question about Catriona. She is a near-exact replica of Mr. Herreshoff's "Bounty" design, built in 2001 for a Boston client. His instructions were that, "this vessel is to be built as Mr. Herreshoff would do, if he were alive today." This gentleman had the wherewithall to spare no expense on the boat. His family has owned several Herreshoffs, and they were personal friends of the Herreshoff's. She is framed in laminated Doug fir on an angelique backbone and planked in silver bali. The deck & rig hardware was custom cast to the original Herreshoff designs. The trailboards and stern badge were designed by noted marine artist William Gilkerson and carved at Lunenburg Chiselworks. The ship's wheel is a magnificent work of craftsmanship incorporating brass, mother-of-pearl, and 300-year-old salvaged ebony inlays. The ebony was salvaged from a wreck off Cape Cod that was discovered by the owner's brother who, besides being an accomplished wreck diver, was a Nobel laureate in physics. The wheel was built by the grandson of the founder of the Edson Steering Company. All trim above & below, and all deck furniture, is built from a single teak log so that all pieces have similar grain and colour characteristics. The interior arrangement is the only departure from the original Herresoff design - the client wanted a double-cabin layout so that the vessel could be put into charter when not being used by the family. The details & style are Herreshoff, but the layout is new. She carries a Herreshoff 10-ft pram, built in cedar and oak by my buddy Kevin Wambach, as her tender.







    I was fortunate enough to be called upon to do the design and engineering work on this fine replica.
    Hope for the best, but plan for the worst.

  11. #81
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    Default Re: L. Francis h.

    If I could choose any one "thing" in life to get to be a steward for it would be "Catriona". The winning lottery numbers are 1234567890 I just need to get em in the right combinations. Is she still for sale?

  12. #82
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    Default Re: L. Francis h.

    mmd,
    "Catriona" is a stunning boat! I was interested in the possibly owning her when she came up for sale. Two things were a bit iffy for me. I did not care for the interior as it is more modern than I care for. But that is just a personal whim.
    The real concern was the laminated fir frames. Knowing how much this design twists in a sea way, I was not convinced that laminated fir was the best choice for framing materials. I do know a horror story of another replica "Bounty" that suffered serious structural damage as a result of not taking that factor into consideration.
    Jay

  13. #83
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    Default Re: L. Francis h.

    Quote Originally Posted by seo View Post
    Jay,
    I'm having trouble keeping track of the boats.
    What is "Catriona?" She looks like a Bounty/Tioga.
    You show some pictures of a boat called "Bounty." Is that the "Original" Bounty, or the Bounty/Poquita/L. Francis Herreshoff?
    If it's the original, where is she these days?
    Why do people do that business of tooling the seam compound so that the boat has stripes?
    Perhaps I can share a bit of light here as well. The first boat to the design we refer to as "Bounty" was the center boarder "Tioga"
    The boat was first designed for Waldo Brown as a day sailor. However, it was soon obvious that at larger boat was needed and so the second boat, the 72' "Tioga II" was designed by LFH and built. The boat was soon re-named "Ticonderoga". When Edward Dane was about to gratuate from college, his parents asked what he would like as a gratuation present. His answere was, "I should like to have a smaller boat such as the first boat that Mr. Herreshoff designed but I should like it to have a fixed keel. And so, the second of the 57' ketches was built and launched as "Bounty". This is the boat that is now located in Newport Beach CA. So far as the name "Poquita" is conderned, I have no documentaion to either prove or disprove that portion of the story. The habit of undercutting seams on hulls is a west coast practice that allows one or two painters to carry the hull when applying paint by brush. There is also a therory that it assists in breaking down parasitic drag.
    Jay
    Last edited by Jay Greer; 05-24-2009 at 01:18 PM.

  14. #84
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    Default Re: L. Francis h.

    A valid concern, Jay. I calculated the structural strength of the original white oak frame scantlings and then the laminated fir, taking into consideration the interlaminar shear and the shear and rupture values for the different species. The laminated fir frames were mathematically about 110% of the strength of the original oak frames, but I'm aware of wood's propensity for making fools out of engineers. However, I had not heard anything about any delamination, rupture, breakage, nor structural problems of the vessel during the time of ownership by the original owner. Since it was sold, I have lost touch with her. It would be nice to hear an update on her, good or bad.

    Edit to add: The interior was laid out as per the client's wishes & desires. One man's meat is another's poison, tho'...
    Hope for the best, but plan for the worst.

  15. #85
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    Default Re: L. Francis h.

    Quote Originally Posted by mmd View Post
    A valid concern, Jay. I calculated the structural strength of the original white oak frame scantlings and then the laminated fir, taking into consideration the interlaminar shear and the shear and rupture values for the different species. The laminated fir frames were mathematically about 110% of the strength of the original oak frames, but I'm aware of wood's propensity for making fools out of engineers. However, I had not heard anything about any delamination, rupture, breakage, nor structural problems of the vessel during the time of ownership by the original owner. Since it was sold, I have lost touch with her. It would be nice to hear an update on her, good or bad.
    I wish I had known about you at the time I was interested in her. I never have framed or heard of a a boat framed with laminated fir and so was naturaly leery of it.
    I posed the same question to William Cannell and was unable to recieve a satisfactory answer. By the time I was about to buy a plane ticket to fly back and inspect the boat, she had been snapped up!
    I am still considering building one once by shop is done.
    Jay
    Last edited by Jay Greer; 05-12-2009 at 06:50 PM.

  16. #86
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    Default Re: L. Francis h.

    Not to be endlessly tiresome over small matters. But this is history, and in respect to the various parties, I'd like to see it right:
    This is what I think I know:
    1) The original "Bounty" was built by Quincy Adams in the 30's.
    2) Rig, hardware, deck erections, etc, AND THE NAME were taken off this hull in the 60's and installed in a new hull.
    2a) question for mmd: was this hull built in Nova Scotia? Maybe Bridgewater?
    3) The original hull was rebuilt in Rockland Maine by Lee's Boat Shop, and named Poquita.
    3a) General question. Did Poquita become the "L. Francis Herreshoff?"

    A tiny editorial point. The name is spelled "Haffenreffer" They were in the beer business in Rhode Island. It appears that there was a lot of money to be made in the beer biz back around prohibition. I wonder how that happened?

  17. #87
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    Default Re: L. Francis h.

    Like Herreshoff, I am guilty of spelling words "phoneticaly" rather than phonetically.
    I do know that Herrenreffer also made whiskey as I once had a wooden whiskey case that was stamped with their name.

    Facts that live in the minds of men often become fogged over with the passing of years. In fact, much of what I am mentioning here is from memory and not from notes taken at the time of my hearing it. As L. Francis Herrehoff often said, "Some Tuesday next week, I will have to get around to taking care of that". So far as whether or not the boat that is here in Newport Harbor and named "Bounty" is concerned, I believe a simple call to her owner would satisfy the question as to whether or not she was once named "Poquita". I was told by Dan Carter former owner of Quiet Tune and the executor of the Herreshoff estate that this "Bounty" is the original hull as was also related to me in information from Muriel Vaughn. But then, I don't know anything about boats. So, I will have to check further into the facts.
    With all due respect for the pursuit of truth.
    Jay
    Last edited by Jay Greer; 05-12-2009 at 08:52 PM.

  18. #88
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    Default Re: L. Francis h.

    seo, your question 2a is vague: Were you referring to the new hull mentioned in your question 2, or to Catriona? I do not know anything about the second Bounty, possibly built in Nova Scotia. Catriona was built on Cape Cod.
    Hope for the best, but plan for the worst.

  19. #89
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    Default Re: L. Francis h.

    TIOGA
    In 1983 I was sailing as engineer on the "Pride of Baltimore," hereafter referred to as PB1. She was the Pride that sank mid-ocean in 1985, and was replaced by PB2. Anyway. We left San Francisco in September 1983, bound for Baltimore. Our first stop was in Santa Barbara, where a former crewmember lived. She'd invited us to stop there, and we spent a couple days.
    (Travelogue note: Boy, the coast of California was brown and monotonous. No islands or bays, just a jagged range of mountains, and dun chapparal.)
    While in S. Barbara I ran across a very beautiful vessel sitting unattended in the middle of a parking lot, with the rig still up. It was "Tioga," the 57' Herreshoff ketch that according to Jay Greer was the original in the string of Herreshoff ketches.
    This was a long time ago, and my rapidly deteriorating memory cells can't recall how I found out that she was for sale. But I became very enthusiastic, in spite of not having much money.
    Our next port of call was San Diego, where we had a refit scheduled. I got my work done fairly quickly, which involved removing the prop to be repitched, and figuring out how to stow an extra several hundred gallons of fuel. The fuel was easy; five gallon plastic olive oil jugs ranged along both sides of the after cabin trunk, with a stout timber stuck through the handles of the jugs, and lashed down to eye-bolts in the deck.
    Don't worry, we're not done with Tioga...
    The prop wasn't exactly rocket science. The PB1's poor 3304 Cat natural could only turn 950 revs at full rack, which translated to about 60 horsepower on the power curve graph, and would only push her about 4.5 kt. So off the prop came, and went to the prop shop, where they flattened it out quite drastically. when it was re-installed the engine would turn more like 1800 revs, which was 130+ hp, as I remember it, and for the first time in her short life the PB1 could actually get out of her own way while under power.
    The actual process of changing out the prop was interesting. There was no such thing as a SCUBA rig, so I used the inflatable's foot pump ductaped to a skindiver's snorkel for surface supply, a borrowed wheel puller, and Bob's Your Uncle, as they say.
    Actively resting on my laurels following this coup, I got a day off, rented a car, and drove from San Diego to Santa Barbara. My companion on this trip was a guy named Rob Whalen, who's currently a highly respected shipwright at Mystic Seaport. The PB1 was his first job afloat after growing up as a SoCal motorhead and cycle thug. Funny, the paths we travel...
    I had talked to Tioga's owner on the 'phone, and she was in fact for sale. He had her mortgaged for (as I remember it) $90,000, and would let her go for that. He'd also collude in wrap-around financing, where I'd take over the payments. Did I mention that he was a real estate developer, speculator, financier, and all-around dollar whore? But nice.
    Sitting on stands in the middle of a sun-baked asphalt parking lot had not done Tioga any good. She showed some open seams and sprung butts, but her rig was lovely and the interior was like a shrine to some minor god of beauty and grace.
    So there she sat, and there I left her. I am the offspring of squarehead Swede immigrants, who don't do wraparound financing. We just work hard, drink too much in middle age, and quietly regret the missed chances to swing for the fence.
    Like so many of the beauties I knew when I was young, I wonder where she is now...
    SEO

  20. #90
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    Default Re: L. Francis h.

    mmd,
    Where in Cape Cod did they build "Catriona?"
    In regard to 2a, I was asking if you'd ever heard of a "Bounty" hull being built in the 60's in Nova Scotia. It would have been the replacement hull for the original Bounty.
    What's puzzling me here is that Jay posted some pictures of a boat with "Bounty" on her bow, and a west coast paint job. Is that the "original" Bounty, or the one that he described as having a kind of clumsy Cabin trunk.
    Compared to peace in our time in the middle east, this is a small thing to concern oneself with.

  21. #91
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    Default Re: L. Francis h.

    The tale of "Tioga" is one of many slip ups and recoveries. The boat was brought through the Canal by my friends Dan Carter and Ivan Summers in the mid sixties. "Tioga" was pulled at the yard where I was building a Choy Seimans Catamaran for wild life photographer Jim Dutcher . The hull was soft in the frame heels around the center board trunk and after a call to LFH we proceeded to do some needed repairs in that area. I spent many happy days sailing her over the years as she was purchased by my wife's cousin Chester Salisbury. Chet took her up the coast to San Francisco where he kept her in an anchorage at Sausilito. "Tioga" then was taken to Half Moon Bay where Chet was developing a tract of custom built homes. "Tioga" served as a bill board for his business as Chet used the sails for posting advertising. After that the boat was brought back to Newport Beach she went aground in on a sand beach on Balboa Island in a surprise S. Easter. The boat was pulled off the sand bar and due to the fact that Chet had to go north to deal with business, the boat sat at a mooring while the torrido worms lunched on her dead wood eating the stbd. side down to the drift bolts. After much effort, the boat was restored and sold to a new owner. After that time I lost track of her, hearing only that she was on the hard up in Oxnard. That is all I can report about her at this time.
    Jay

  22. #92
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    Default Re: L. Francis h.

    Now that you mention Oxnard, that is in fact where Tioga was, and where the Pride docked. There was some connection to Santa Barbara, maybe that the ex-crewman's family lived closer to Santa Barbara than to Oxnard. It was a fairly long time ago, and my SoCal geography isn't very good.
    Aside from that one trip on the Pride, the only other time I've been in California was ten days spent in a motel in Long Beach while being indoctrinated by ARCO before being sent off on one of their tankers. At one time they offered me a job on shore in Long Beach instead of on the ships, and were surprised when I turned it down. But I'm not much of a city guy, and certainly not a suburbanite, and that seemed about all that was going on in Long Beach.

  23. #93
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    Default Re: L. Francis h.

    Marblehead is one word.

    I was born about 1/4 mile from the Castle.
    Some here have heard my story with LFH.
    I lived right next door to Eaton's drug store where Muriel worked. LFH came to pick her up daily and would wait for her. LFH was not a kid friendly kind of guy but I did want to know abut his car and if I approached he'd sort of just ignore me over the years.

    Dad called one day and told me he was headed for the dump where his buddy worked. He picked up a Blue Jay that was almost complete. He brought it to the house and placed it where LFH could see it off the side of the driveway.
    The boat needed a rudder, tiller and some work on the bottom around the c-board. We covered the boat for the winter and dad died that fall.

    I'm out there in the spring (11 years old), scratching my head and praying for some guidance. LFH may have known dad died and got out of his car and asked me if needed help. I met him at the Castle and we walked down to Graves and he got the "Swede" to guide me in cutting out a rudder and rigging it.
    Me and LFH lifted some of the plywood around the c-board hole and rebedded the plywood. Can't remember where I got sails but I thnk LFH pointed me to them.

    It wasn't till later that I came to realize how good god was listening that scary day in the driveway.
    Last edited by Chris Coose; 05-13-2009 at 11:38 AM.
    Study Peace

  24. #94
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    Default Re: L. Francis h.

    Yes, many people were leery of L. Francis thinking he was cantankerous. You are very fortunate to have been befriended by him. He was capable of having temper snits and greatly disliked things that to his way of thinking were "Not proper." I beleve it is the Eastern YC that is just a short distance from the Castle? On a day that a summer storm was brewing, Francis decided he wanted to secure the lines and covers on his boat that was on a bouy in the club anchorage. He asked the dockmaster to arrange for him to be taken out to his boat in the club launch. The answere was that there were other more important things to be done and that he would not take Skipper out to his boat. Herreshoff gave him a verbal dressing down, stormed into the club office and proceeded to resign from the club. He never set foot in the place again.
    Jay

  25. #95
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    Default Re: L. Francis h.

    Boston Yacht Club, the Eastern is on the other side of the harbor, but good stories all.

  26. #96
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    Default Re: L. Francis h.

    I read a lot of his stuff early on in my youth and continue to do so.
    When my boating world changed some last year and found that Victoria was now to become more a day boat than a small cruiser. I (in the LFH tradition of simplicity) had a great time stripping Victoria down to the new catagory.

    I read the Complete Cruiser before I came upon Victoria 35 years ago. That reading is probably why I have been perfectly content with a 19' centerboard fat girl for what appears a life long relationship.
    Which is also probably the primary reason I have remained residentially within a Stop sign from mooring locations adjacent to the finest gunkholing cruising on the face of the planet.
    Last edited by Chris Coose; 05-13-2009 at 12:05 PM.
    Study Peace

  27. #97
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    Default Re: L. Francis h.

    One day in 1973 I was working for a newspaper in Minnesota. I liked the writing part pretty well, but was not a talented interviewer. I can remember sitting in my car for hours instead of going somewhere and interviewing someone.
    Anyway.
    One day I found myself hiding in the stacks of the Minneapolis Public Library, avoiding an interview. At that time I'd never spent a night on a sailboat, or done anything that might be considered cruising.
    As fate would have it, I picked up a copy of "The Compleat Cruiser," and within ten months owned a very minimal cruising boat, an Atkins "Bluebird" 18' sloop built in 1938, complete with Kermath Sea Pup engine and a trailer.
    Shortly after I took the boat on a winter trip in the Florida Keys, and found that Herreshoff's advice on just about everything involved with cruising was about perfect.
    It's been all downhill from there.
    SEO

  28. #98
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    Default Re: L. Francis h.

    My sailing epiphany of sorts came when I saw Tern, the LFH leeboard ketch in the Able Tasman national park sth island NZ in 1981.
    ' we could do that ' I thought. We bought a windsurfer in 82 and Waione in 83.
    Tern in january this year. She's owned by friends of ours now , and by coincidence the old owner from 1981 was aboard her that weekend. It was fun to meet her and tell her that story.


    and Matari at mahuangi in january. She's been to the islands every winter for the last couple of decades I'm told.
    Last edited by John B; 05-13-2009 at 04:21 PM.

  29. #99
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    Default Re: L. Francis h.

    Tern is a delight. And, it is truly refreshing to see a Marco Polo rigged with three masts as she was designed to be.
    Jay

  30. #100
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    Default Re: L. Francis h.

    This is what I find remarkable about LFH. He was able to design vessels that were incredibly well suited to a very wide diversity of uses. Canoeing, beach cruising, gunk-holing, coastwise cruising, ocean cruising, international round-the-buoys racing, and somewhat inadvertantly, maybe the ultimate ocean racer, Ticonderoga, who conquered in a type of racing that LFH seemed to hold in contempt.

  31. #101
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    Default Re: L. Francis h.

    This conversation is worth years of lurking through forum posts. Thank you all! I've been an LFH admirer since my father brought a copy of Sensible Cruising Designs home, late '73 or '74. Prudence and Rozinante continue to monopolize my dreams, decades later.
    Life is too long to live with an ugly boat...

  32. #102
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Belfast and Marshall Cove, Islesboro, Maine
    Posts
    1,929

    Default Re: L. Francis h.

    In 1981 I was trying to get the rebuild job done on my H-28. I had moved out of my shop in Rockland Maine, and the boat was in storage. At the same time, my brother had moved to Vermont and set up a woodworking shop in Putney, VT. He didn't have a lot of work, and the boat was sitting on a flat bed truck that I owned (A retired 66 passenger school bus that I'd bought and used for hauling baled hay in a previous agricultural incarnation). In any event, driving from Maine to Vermont was no big deal, so off we went, bus, boat, with the Young Lady driving a Saab 96 chase car.
    Wasn't life more fun when we were young?
    We set up shop in Putney, with the boat right next to US RT 5 where it's the main drag of Putney, and went to work, wiring, regluing the mast, varnishing the house. Another project was building a new cockpit, which was a case of me inventing the wheel. This might be actually an original design, which featured a cockpit "tub" with a slightly arced bottom so that it could work with only a single centerline drain. The tub could be easily removed by opening the lazarette hatch that opened into the cockpit, and removing a block that held the tub forward. At that point the cockpit seat hatches were lifted, and the tub pushed aft about two inches, where its front slid out from under the bridge deck.
    At that point the cockpit tub could be simply lifted up, the drain hose disconnected, and the tub removed. This exposed the rear of the engine, the shaft and shaft log, and frames and floors under the cockpit.
    Of course this could only be done with the mizzen out, but that was fairly easy to do without a lot of drama, using the mizzen staysail halyard and main halyard to lift the mizzen's head up and forward to the main masthead.
    I think that this might actually be a case of inventing, rather than re-inventing, the wheel, because of a conversation I had one day.
    My brother and I were standing by the boat when a Renault "LeCar" econobox pulled up, and a well-dressed grey-haired couple got out. By this time we were very accustomed to people stopping to offer comments, advice, and bon mot centering on the fact that we were a long way from the ocean.
    "Quite a project," the man said, which I agreed, yes it was. "Nice boat," he commented.
    His wife was standing next to him, and she asked him "Was this boat designed by anybody?"
    I was about to respond "No, you damn fool. It sprang fully formed out of god's forehead," or something equally jolly.
    But instead the man told her "This is a Herreshoff H-28."
    That was interesting. I commented that very few people in Putney Vermont knew who Herreshoff was, much less what an H-28 looked like. "I design boats," he said.
    That explained it. I could imagine him spending his career as an insurance underwriter in Hartford CT, doodling boats on scrap paper, waiting for retirement so that he could indulge his lifelong interest in yacht design. I had it on the tip of my tongue to ask whether any of his designs had been built, or to ask what kind of boats, and very luckily I simply asked "what's your name?"
    "Olin Stephens," he replied.
    Well. "I design boats" was an understatement.
    I showed him around the boat, and he said that he'd never seen a cockpit like the one that we had built, thought it was a good idea. I asked him if he thought the H-28 was a good design. "We once had a commission to design a weekend cruiser, and Al Mason had the job. I told him to just take an H-28 and give it a profile that made it look like an S&S boat. So that's what he did."
    Al Mason was a well-known designer who worked for S&S, and also designed boats on his own hook. He designed a pretty little cruiser called an "Ostkust," but that seems more similar to a Folkboat than to an H-28.
    In any event, there's an LFH anecdote that features Olin Stephens!

  33. #103
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Port Townsend WA
    Posts
    12,701

    Default Re: L. Francis h.

    One of the personal touches at the Castle was that Skipper and Muriel liked the Christmas cards that were sent by their many friends so much that they strung them across the ceiling of the lower dining room and kept them up all year long. The dining table was the oval table that Skipper used for the building of several double paddle canoes. But on the side board sat a tin bread box that always contained a fresh loaf of bread. In the morning L. Francis would carve off a slice for him self and Muriel that she would pop into the toaster. As a result of the constant daily ritual of cutting bread, thousands of knife marks were scored into the table top. The amazing thing was that every cut was exactly parallel to all of the others. It was as if the cutting had been done with the aid of a miter gauge! Such was the accuracy of the eye and hand of the master.
    Jay

  34. #104
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Port Townsend WA
    Posts
    12,701

    Default Re: L. Francis h.

    I have placed a call to the owner of the 57' "Bounty" ketch that is located in Newport Harbor CA in order to ask if the boat was ever registered under the name "Poquita". I hope to have an answer soon.
    Jay

  35. #105
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    Portland, Maine
    Posts
    17,984

    Default Re: L. Francis h.

    This truly is a great thread. As the owner of an Al Mason designed Ostkust I especially liked seo's last post.


    Steven

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