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Thread: Building a Beach Pea

  1. #1
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    Default Building a Beach Pea

    I promised to post some progress pictures so here goes.
    I'm making the 15 foot version.

    First thing I needed was a fairing batten over 16' long. I had to scarf one up.

    Cutting the scarf joint.

    Gluing up along a reliable straight edge.

    I had to make 2 joints but they came out pretty fair.
    Last edited by ToddFwbf; 03-23-2009 at 01:30 PM.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Building a Beach Pea

    The next thing was to set up the ladder frame on which I will erect the molds.
    I had a frame left over from an earlier project. This previous job was to build an ark over 16 feet tall. Yes, tall, it was an ark to hold the Torah in a synagogue.

    I was hired to translate a designer's rough idea into reality. I created a building model to scale, then developed the design by using geometric functions to define points that I then lofted on the floor to lift off vertical and horizontal frame members which were assembled on the ladder frame, skinned and veneered. Anyway, I had on hand the ladder frame, so I pulled it down from ceiling storage and set her up.

    Winding sticks, level and string established a flat, horizontal plane. When one string just lifted the one it crossed under the plane was flat.


    I installed my first mold, mold number 6, the center mold such that the other molds would line up at convenient locations and square to the center line as shown by the tight string.


    And the molds are set up.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Building a Beach Pea

    I've got the molds set up and have been checking for fairness.





    Here you can see the Spanish windlass used to hold the batten down near the stems (no stems on yet). I used little blocks of wood clamped onto the molds to help hold the batten and was very careful about deforming the curve with the clamps.

    Last edited by ToddFwbf; 04-09-2009 at 09:18 AM. Reason: change image hosting

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Building a Beach Pea

    I am also doing finish tests on some wood samples and comparing them with possible colors for paint. (Yeah, I know, but it's the furniture designer in me, I can't help it.)


    That's cypress (the darker wood) and Eastern cedar.

    BTW, this is how I store a brush between coats. The can contains thinner. The brush has been rinsed 3 or times w/ used thinner that has sat long enough to become clear again and poured through a paper coffee filter. Then I let it set in new thinner.

    Last edited by ToddFwbf; 04-09-2009 at 09:16 AM.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Building a Beach Pea

    This how I lofted the stem profiles. The plans gave enough points to draw a fair curve through. You can see my shop-made drafting weights, they are ingots of lead painted with felt glued on the bottoms and shop-made hooks.



    Here's close up view showing how the hooks work on the batten, Sometimes the hooks pull in, sometimes they hold down and sometimes the weight just pushes.

    Last edited by ToddFwbf; 04-09-2009 at 09:13 AM.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Building a Beach Pea

    Todd , post #5 didn't have any images for me .....but this is going to be good ,thanks ! Beach Pea is a boat that is very likely to be built in my shop .
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  7. #7

    Default Re: Building a Beach Pea

    Ooooh this is good but wait I didn't know there was a 15' foot version, aaagh now I have another potential candidate to try to decide on for my own build. Thanks for sharing. Great pics and wonderful clean work.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Building a Beach Pea

    Quote Originally Posted by PeterSibley View Post
    Todd , post #5 didn't have any images for me .....but this is going to be good ,thanks ! Beach Pea is a boat that is very likely to be built in my shop .
    OK, looks like I'll have to rework the posts using another image hosting.

    Thanks.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Building a Beach Pea

    Quote Originally Posted by Gerard View Post
    Ooooh this is good but wait I didn't know there was a 15' foot version, aaagh now I have another potential candidate to try to decide on for my own build. Thanks for sharing. Great pics and wonderful clean work.
    Yeah, the 15' version uses the same molds but spaced 14" apart instead of 12". The stems are different too. Hylan sells the additional sheets you need.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Building a Beach Pea

    Quote Originally Posted by PeterSibley View Post
    Todd , post #5 didn't have any images for me .....but this is going to be good ,thanks ! Beach Pea is a boat that is very likely to be built in my shop .
    OK, I used flickr for #5 and I hope this works. I'll re-do the others too.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Building a Beach Pea

    The patterns I made by lofting the stems onto that piece of oak veneer fiber core board were used to trace a pattern for the laminating form.



    Generally I like to work the shape of a form out on 5/8" or 3/4" material. It's a lot easier to get the curve fair. I then screw and glue it onto additional stock to build the thickness as needed. The work piece is then taken to the shaper and using a flush trim bearing against the piece previously shape with a straight cutter the form is shaped. A router would work as well.

    I painted on a couple of coats of thinned shellac and gave it a light sanding so that the face would take several coats of paste wax. This was then mounted on a melamine surfaced board and waxed again. I like to be able to clamp the laminae down to a surface as well as up against the form. It saves on material as you don't have as much to trim off to get a nice flat, square edge after it all comes off the form.

    The outer stem will be laminated over the inner stem on the form.

  12. #12

    Default Re: Building a Beach Pea

    Thanks for the info ToddFwbf. I went to Hylan's website and looked at the drawings, I really like it. Wasn't mad about the 13' version but stretched to 15' she is really pretty! Hmm, I'll be watching your build with interest.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Building a Beach Pea

    Gerard, yeah, I want to "pay back" this forum a little for all of the great advice and information I've gleaned from it over the years so I'm going to try and be pretty comprehensive on reporting how this goes, mistakes and all. I hope I'll encourage others in a small way to go ahead and start cutting some wood for a boat of their own.

    My first mistake was adding way too many braces to the molds. Turns out Doug recommends bracing only mold #6 and aligning the rest with lines marked on the bottom piece when you put that on. Makes sense.

    Also, please, anyone, if you see me going awry somewhere don't hesitate to comment. It won't hurt my feelings one bit.

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Building a Beach Pea- northern white cedar

    I just got about 120 brdft of 5/4 northern white cedar in 8 foot lengths. Most of it is vertical grain and the widths range from 5" to 8"+. It was from a friend that I had done some boat building with in the past. He had it stashed away in a self storage shed up here in Milwaukee, WI. The surface M.C. seems to average around 12%. Growth rings look to be in the 20 per inch range. There are small tight knots in most of the boards.

    I had a couple pieces from his pile in my heated shop for about a year and they came in at about 6% M.C. today. We get some very dry air in the winter with temperatures near zero for part of the winter. The moisture content of the air really drops when you heat that cold air up to 60 degrees.

    I have a couple of questions. I'm thinking of using this for thwarts, stern sheets and floor boards (2 pieces have a nice curve). What about scarfing them up for gunwales? What about breasthooks?

    I'd like to use this for laminating the stems but don't think it's strong enough and worry about screw holding. Am I right? The Beach Pea is a glued lapstrake (ply strakes) build. Also, what about oars?

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Building a Beach Pea

    Great thread, Todd. I'll be watching this one. I'm a peapod fan.

    That cedar sounds great for thwarts, maybe not strong enough for gunwales and breasthooks.

    Steven

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Building a Beach Pea

    Thanks Steven. I'll likely go w/ some fir for the stems. Depending on how light the fir is that I get I'll have to look for something else for the breasthooks.

  17. #17
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    Default Re: Building a Beach Pea

    OK, it's been a while since I last posted. I had a delay in getting the c.v.g. fir I've decided on for laminating the stems. I was able to pick up 2 nice 2x6's 10 ft long today and proceeded to rip to 2" widths then re-saw to 13/64" thickness which seemed to bend around the form nicely.



    Here is a dry run for the inner stems. You can see my "xtra hands" that come in handy when everything gets slippery with glue. I like to put the first clamp where it looks like the sharpest part of the bend is. I use the left over strips from re-sawing as cauls between the clamps and the laminae.

    Here's the glue up:




    I like to add some pressure down on the stack to keep it from wandering off out of one plane.


    Here's my wetting out set-up. A section of foam roller works pretty good. I've already stripped it off the roller frame in this shot.


    The outer stems get glued up over the inner stems as they will have to fit over them later.

  18. #18
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    Default Re: Building a Beach Pea

    OK, hit a bit of a snag but think I've overcome it. Since I'm building the 15' version I had to loft the stems from the additional drawings I purchased from Doug. He draws the stems out full size in the plans for the 13' version (which you need to also do the longer boat) but only gives you a scale drawing for the 15' version along with dimensions needed to loft the curves.

    I drew the curves and got the patterns out fine. But I failed to mark the inner and outer lap marks for each plank on the patterns and I cut the patterns from the original 1/4" ply I had lofted the curves onto. (Memo to self: pay attention to Doug's instructions and read ahead.)

    There was the additional problem in that the lofting for the stems for the 15' boat do not show the inner and outer lap marks. The lofting shows the lines. A bit of noodling helped me figure this out though (I hope). His lines (L1, L2, etc.) are to the outside of the hull (again, I hope). Projecting over from the full size drawing of station 1 that shows the strakes and laps onto the center line and taking that back to the re-lofted stem lay-out and assuming a pretty close to straight line for that small section of the lines that run from station 1 to the stem I think I've got the angle for the lines just about pretty close. Then up (at right angle to this line and up meaning towards the sheer) the 3/4" called for in the directions for the lap and shift the line up to that mark and I think I've got a pretty good mark for the laps on the stem patterns.

    I'll double check all of this by using the batten on the mold set up and when laying out the final cuts for the strakes.

  19. #19
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    Default Re: Building a Beach Pea

    I just finished the 13' version; lofting it up from WB issues 133-135. As soon as I figure out this "web hosting" I will post some more pictures. I am very pleased with the results. It is a pleasure to row.
    I used 5 and 9 mm baltic birch underlayment which has no voids and is made up with exterior glue. Most of the trim and thwarts are of white oak and a small amount of red cedar. My first set of oars are made from white oak and cedar. Look great, but are too heavy and unbalanced in addition to the blade being too narrow. Now, having read "Oars for Pleasure Rowing" by Andrew Steever, I am paying more attention to the "science". My next ones I am currently making are from baltic birch plywood and western cedar. I cut the profile of the shaft from 9mm plywood and laminate the 5mm blade to it with a step joint. Then I laminate the cedar to each side of the shaft and begin to shape it with a hand plane and belt sander, finishing up with an orbital sander and finally with sandpaper glued to the inner surface of 2'' PVC pipe. Blade width will start with 7" and be tested before trimming down.
    I think I may try it out with cheap clamp-on swivel oar locks before commiting to a fixed pin design.
    Your construction techniques and molds are very professional, much better than mine.

  20. #20
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    Default Re: Building a Beach Pea

    Quote Originally Posted by ToddFwbf View Post
    This how I lofted the stem profiles. The plans gave enough points to draw a fair curve through. You can see my shop-made drafting weights, they are ingots of lead painted with felt glued on the bottoms and shop-made hooks.



    Here's close up view showing how the hooks work on the batten, Sometimes the hooks pull in, sometimes they hold down and sometimes the weight just pushes.




    Im jealous of your weights! what a great idea!
    There's the plan, then there's what actually happens.

    Ben Sebens, RN

    15' Welsford Navigator Inconceivable
    16' W. Simmons Mattinicus double ender ​Matty

  21. #21
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    Default Re: Building a Beach Pea

    ChasQ, thanks for the compliment.

    BBSebens: Yeah those weights have worked out great for years. I originally had thought of casting my own in the traditional shape. Looking around for lead I found a source locally and that was the shape of the ingots they had. It occured to me to just go ahead and use that shape. I glued felt onto the bottoms and painted them.

    They have stamped on them "DOE USE RUN". Hmm, now what would the Department of Energy be needing lead for? Better not ask. ;-)

  22. #22
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    Default Re: Building a Beach Pea

    Quote Originally Posted by ToddFwbf View Post
    They have stamped on them "DOE USE RUN". Hmm, now what would the Department of Energy be needing lead for? Better not ask. ;-)
    Thanks for the great thread.

    "Doe Run" is the name of a lead smelter in Missouri. Maybe related? Not sure what the USE would mean.

    Brian

  23. #23
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    Default Re: Building a Beach Pea

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Palmer View Post
    Thanks for the great thread.

    "Doe Run" is the name of a lead smelter in Missouri. Maybe related? Not sure what the USE would mean.

    Brian
    Ah, thanks. And here all along I had visions of the Manhattan Project.

  24. #24
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    Default Re: Building a Beach Pea



    The stems have been set up on the building mold and I am trimming them to accept the bottom board here.

    My shipment of plywood came in yesterday. I got hydrotek BS1088 Meranti from Homestead Hardwoods in Vickery, OH. Very fast turn around and nice to work with. I went with them because they offered 9mm 4' x 10' which saved me a scarf for the bottom board.

    As soon as the ply was safely in the shop I proceeded to lay out the bottom board.





    And then to cut it out on the table saw.


  25. #25

    Default Re: Building a Beach Pea

    Great shop Todd and I'm enjoying watching the work progress. Very envious of hte shop I must say, lot of natural light too it looks like. Wow. Are you having fun yet? Gerard

  26. #26
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    Default Re: Building a Beach Pea

    Oh yeah, I love the shop. It's not cheap to heat but the light is great, as is the air in the summer.

  27. #27
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    Default Re: Building a Beach Pea

    Todd - how's your Beach Pea coming on?

    Lance

  28. #28
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    Default Re: Building a Beach Pea

    Bump .....?????
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  29. #29
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    Default Re: Building a Beach Pea

    Todd are you still among the living???? Any other Beach Pea builds happening? I need all the help I can get! JayInOz

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