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Thread: how to pick the right dingy design

  1. #1
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    Default how to pick the right dingy design

    Please help me.

    I would like to build a dingy this winter but I am not sure where to begin.


    I think the following would be important:
    • lines to be very similar to Milky Way
    • the dingy to be light enough for one person to pull it up onto the cabin top
    • configured so that if it is large enough that it is configured to allow the companion way hatch to slide underneath it when it is stowed on the cabin top
    • to be a rowing dingy but able to be added to in seasons to come for a sailing dingy
    • for her to tow well
    • have some bright work but be white on the outside
    • have nice traditional hardware
    • not cost a fortune
    • to have pedigree(if that makes sense)
    here is Milky Way



    sowadayathink ?
    Last edited by gregleeber; 11-17-2008 at 05:55 PM. Reason: add Milky Way pic

  2. #2
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    Default Re: how to pick the right dingy design

    We've been very happy with our Joel White designed 9'6" Nutshell Pram. If that's too big there is the 8' version, too. One of these years, though, I'll build a nice little lapstrake tender out of cedar and black locust. Maybe an Iain Oughtred Humble Bee like Norm Messenger's. Iain has several other contenders, do you have his design catalog?

    Steven

  3. #3
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    Default Re: how to pick the right dingy design

    Steve,

    no I dont have a catalog. I dont know much about various designs. I like your pram a lot. How many hours did it take to build?
    Last edited by gregleeber; 11-17-2008 at 06:35 PM.

  4. #4

    Default Re: how to pick the right dingy design

    http://www.duck-trap.com/2002sun.html
    touch heavy (125lbs), but from what i can see, she'll compliment Milky Way well

  5. #5
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    Default Re: how to pick the right dingy design

    Jacques Mertens, a naval architect and a blue water sailer, designed the D4, later to become the D5, for his personal oceangoing sailboat.
    It is not traditional. It is S&G. You have to make some compromises if you want minimum weight. It was designed to fit on a cabin roof, to be capable of severe loading, to be stabile in a choppy anchorage, and to rowed or motored. Later it was altered to take a sail and daggerboard. For minimum weight it has to be built with okoume. It's only 7'10" x 46".
    The D5 is the most recent version. It has the daggerboard trunk moved back into the middle of the center seat for more room up front.
    You can download the D4 plans free at
    http://www.bateau.com/freeplans.php
    or buy the D5 plans at
    http://www.bateau.com/proddetail.php?prod=D5
    Most of the boats pictured are D4s because the D5 is fairly new yet.
    Almost forgot. The D4/D5 is unsinkable. There are large sealed chambers under the seats that, if constructed airtight, will allow reboarding and bailing.
    No pedigree. I doubt there are any "pedigreed" prams that weigh 60lb. or less.
    Last edited by Cuyahoga Chuck; 11-18-2008 at 10:27 AM.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: how to pick the right dingy design

    For real comfort over the companionway, you want a detachable transom. You may also want a detachable upper part to the bow transom so the boat can snug down better.

    Especially if you have a skylight up there, you'll need to get rid of the center thwart and go with a moveable stool or box seat, as in LFH's tender to the Marco Polo.

    Which gets to my thought - that tender. Don't worry about weight too much as you'll be bringing the dink up on the main halyard. Have a set of lines from each corner of the transom and one on bow eye on the part of the bow transom that stays in place, perhaps about 12' long each such that when the eyes in the free ends come together they can be clipped to the halyard. These will give enough room that once the dink is up over the rail and swung in, you can flip it over in the air and then lower into place. If you have a self-tailing halyard winch, the job can be done alone cranking with one hand and pushing the boat off at key moments with a foot or boathook in the other hand.

    G'luck

  7. #7
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    Default Re: how to pick the right dingy design

    Dinghies often require lots of twitchy compromises. If the length between the mast and the dodger or the face of the house is 10 feet or less, only a pram will give the needed capacity. Limited height under the boom might require concave shapes in the transoms. Skylights or ventilators might dictate the location of thwarts. This one took some fussing.


    I agree with Ian that, for getting a dinghy on deck, if you're going to use the main halyard, weight is not a big issue. A bridle, as would be used for the dinghy's sheet traveler, can work nicely. For getting a dinghy up a beach or onto a car, weight matters. With care, lightness can be achieved. This 8' LF Herreshoff pram is about 75 lbs.


    For easy towing, a dinghy should have a reasonably large skeg, a straight run., and a low towing eye.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: how to pick the right dingy design

    John Welsfords "Tender Behind" would fit your application.
    Wakan Tanka Kici Un
    ..a bad day sailing is a heckuva lot better than the best day at work.....
    Fighting Illegal immigration since 1492....
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  9. #9
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    Default Re: how to pick the right dingy design

    • "lines to be very similar to Milky Way"

    So is that matching the lines of a spiral galaxy or an Angelman ketch?

    How long should this tender be, and should it be a 6'6" clipper-bowed, wineglass sterned boat, or should it just look good on the cabin top?

  10. #10
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    Default Re: how to pick the right dingy design

    ew, I like those last questions. No sure what an Angleman ketch is.... Would like to know though. I suspect a spiral galaxy is, well, our home galaxy - and well that is just way too heavy to pull up on deck.

    Not sure what the length is but I will measure from the mast to the edge of the open hatch - or if the dingy could be made such that the hatch would slide under it then I suspect I could go longer say ten to twelve feet or more...

    I think it would be very cool to have a clipper bow and wine glassed stern but certainly it should look good on the deck.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: how to pick the right dingy design

    If you build a small outrigger canoe it might lie along narrow deck spaces. With clever design the canoe might assemble fairly quickly. The outrigger will make it at least as stable as a dinghy, probably more. If you have to carry an anchor out, you can attach it to the crossbeam and drop it from there. If you lack some room in the narrow canoe hull for light bulky stuff, you, again, put it across/on the cross-beams in a net and still have paddling room. And as a recreational tender, the outrigger canoe makes a fast efficient paddler or sailer. Have an even more crowded deck than most? Build the main hull to bolt-up in halves or thirds (for a very long canoe). A 12-14 foot outrigger canoe can carry two adults easily. See a bolt together design on Gary Dierking's outrigger canoe website (the Wa'Apa, 24 feet or 16 feet if you remove the center section).

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