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Thread: Glen L klondike

  1. #1
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    It's raining here today and I don't feel like cleaning my shop. I have some time to kill so have been looking at a build for my oldest son. I like the looks of the 49 ft. Klondike. What does the list think, built in ply ?

  2. #2
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    You could probably do better that a 49' trawler designed for home building in plywood. Consider what you will put into building it and what its resale value will be.

  3. #3
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    I tend to lean toward something in steel, of about 50 ft. in the trawler type. My son really likes wood and is pretty good with plywood and epoxy, that's what he likes. I realize that ply doesn't sell very well and resale is very important. We do not have the skills neccessary for traditional boat building or the environment, it's either pw or fg cause he can't weld worth a damn and doesn't like to. I think we can build the boat for around 50k but don't have a clue as to resale value. We have the time, facilities and adequate funding to do it. Your knowledge is always apreciated

  4. #4
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    Glen-L Klondike:

    Characteristics
    Length overall 49'-0"
    Length waterline 44'-0"
    Beam 15'-6"
    Hull draft 4'-2"
    Displacement 33,948 lbs.
    Freeboard forward 7'-11"
    Freeboard aft 4'-10"
    Hull depth 12'-1"
    Height less mast 16'-11"
    Headroom 6'-3" to 6'-9"
    Cockpit size 6'-0" x 13'-6"
    Cockpit depth 36"
    Deckhouse size 10'-3" x 16'-3"
    Pilothouse size 10'-3" x 12'-6"
    Boat deck size 14'-0" x 16'-3"
    Fuel capacity 840 gals.
    Cruising range 1300 miles at 12 knots
    Fresh water capacity 315 gals.
    Sleeping accommodations 8-9








  5. #5
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    I can think of better designs......does he intend to finish this decade?

  6. #6
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    these boats have been built befor, we can build it here in dry s.w. Okla. (not dry today) and it would make a decent charter/liveaboard. I'm thinking that myself, my son and a helper, 8 hr.s a day 5 days a week can build it in 6 months, a year at the outside. However, time is not the decideing factor, resale is. If anyone has a better idea for a boat of this size that can be built here I would like to hear it. Timber will not work, cold molded is a possibilty, fg would be the logical choice, or steel. It has to be something my son can do, and plywood is what he likes because that is what he's used up until now, that and fg.

  7. #7
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    Since resale is very important, and "home built" boats usually dont get half the respect that Rodney Dangerfield got, why not start with a hull from a known builder and make it custom from that starting point.

    Long time ago I saw a fellow do that with a glass hull he bought from some builder and finished it to his liking in his side yard. When he was done he had a very nice twin diesel sportfish. Ran it in NJ in the summers, took it to Fla for the winters.

  8. #8
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    that is a very good idea, in fact my son and I are almost done with the rebuild of a Krogen 54, it took about a year to go from stem to stern and in another 4 months it should be done, new everything. He lived on our 44 ft. sportfisher while we rebuilt the trawler in the slip beside it. That was at Sabine Pass Tx. He wants to come back to Okla. for a few years and go back to colledge part time, maybe get his engineering degree, he is a U.S.C.G. certified Captain now and will get his unlimited license next summer. He's at a stage in his life that if dad will keep payin he'll keep doin, and he likes boats. He is VERY intelligent (graduated in the top 1% in the nation, according to the test scores) but became discouraged with colledge after 2 years, typical !!! He passed the Coast Guard exam with 100%, SAID IT WAS EASY. If I can keep him hopped up on boats and pointed in that direction he may turn out to be one of the movers in the industry.

  9. #9

    Thumbs up

    I would take a deep look at one of George Buehlers Diesel Ducks. www.dieselducks.com . The Ducks can be built in wood, incl. ply and also in steel. There are already a bunch of these boats around.

    Jochen

  10. #10
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    I suggest looking at Buehler's Ducks too. I think you're under estimating both the cost and the man hours though. As for resale value, unless it's really special, a large homebuilt boat like that may bring the cost of materials, if you're lucky. A well done Duck may do better because there is at least some demand for them.

    [ 08-14-2005, 10:19 PM: Message edited by: kc8pql ]

  11. #11
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    A little smaller and a bit slower... this is an intresting epoxy ply design.

    http://www.cmdboats.com/powercruiser...f132a7af954c1c

  12. #12
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    joejapan,

    They are beautiful indeed... for some reason those plans are marked "not available" ??

  13. #13
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    I'm planning to build a similar Glen-L Marine design, the Argosy.
    http://www.glen-l.com/designs/cruiser/argosy.html
    From what I can see so far (I've got as far as the study plan and I'm building a model) this is a large sturdy pleasure trawler yacht.
    I'm reduced to considering boats that my wife would eventually step aboard, and that rules out anything that tips over, or has systems that must be operated by more than one person.
    I seriously considered steel, but spending two years wrestling 200kg steel plates into position is past me at my age. WEST system plywood is much better suited to amateur construction. I ended up seeing why so many steel boats are never completed
    The scantlings check out well against Gerr, and the stability intuitivly looks good.
    I'll build the model more like a Nordavn with the cabin out almost to the side of the hull(no side decks), and the rear cockpit more like a cockpit than a deck. I can live without a Portugese bridge, but I would use high railings.
    The boat seems very straight forward to build. I'm estimating 3000+ hours total to launch, bringing in contractors where apropriate, and completing in the water.
    The Klondike would be around 50% bigger putting it around 5000 hours ( Thats about two and a half man years).
    Some comments have the Glen-L boats siting above their waterline on launch so I'd be tempted to put a couple of diagonal layers of 900 gm/m. sq. unidirectional fibreglass on the hull. This and building the boat WEST system would go a long way towards reassuring eventual buyers.
    Current projection have the initial cost sitting under $A100,000 as there are very few specialised marine parts needed before cruise.
    You can't buy anything that size still floating for under $100,000 so financially it could well make sense.
    I don't know what the market is like in other parts of the world, but when I looked sellers were asking over $200,000 for something 25 years old and in need of a 2 year rebuild.
    I had to dig in the memory to remember why I did not consider those fine Devlin boats, but a scout round his web site reminded me - He doesn't sell the plans!

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Glen L klondike

    I realize that this thread is more than 3 years old, but I did feel compelled to add my 2 pennies worth and to ask some questions. One of the reasons is that I'm the moderator over on the Glen-L boatbuilders forum, have been for a long time and as such, I feel a real loyalty to Glen-L designs.

    Quote Originally Posted by paladin View Post
    I can think of better designs......

    I realize that no design is perfect, but why do you say this? And if there are better designs for the person that wants to build one himself, what would this design be and what is it about that design that would make it better? And Please, I'm absolutely NOT being argumentative, I'd really like to know.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gary E View Post
    Since resale is very important, and "home built" boats usually dont get half the respect that Rodney Dangerfield got, why not start with a hull from a known builder and make it custom from that starting point.
    I don't really think it's the plywood itself that puts off potential buyers. I believe that it's the quality of the work of the builder. If you could come to one of our Boatbuilder's Gatherings, you'd see that some people that build at home, are capable of producing work that is absolutely impeccable. And I really think that this is what makes the difference. Many home builders are perfectly happy with less quality in the interest of getting out on the water and enjoying the boat. They don't really plan on resale and if that comes up, they don't care if they break even or take a small loss. But some builders start the build form with an eye toward resale and WOW, the work is fabulous.

    In fact, my personal feeling is that I wouldn't want to buy a GRP boat if it was built using a chop gun. I hate those things. I'm sure there are many glass workers that can do beautiful work with a chop gun but I've seen so much really BAD work with those things that it would be hard to trust any builder until I got to know him.

    Quote Originally Posted by Zumsel View Post
    I would take a deep look at one of George Buehlers Diesel Ducks.
    I did. Wow, I like those. That's what I like about these forums. I probably would not have found that if I hadn't found this thread. There is a lot to be learned there. But you know, I wouldn't buy one from someone else that built one. They're not building with an eye toward pleasing a finicky customer from what I can see. They're building to please themselves and I think that's a good thing.

    The 2 things that I really like about the Klondike are the fact that it has a whopping 1300 mile range and it has an over 15 knot topspeed. Yes, I know that you wouldn't be cruising at that speed but if the weather kicked up and you felt like you needed to run for cover, that extra speed would be nice. I've seen many other production trawler yachts in steel of FG that don't offer those 2 things. They will have shorter range and a lower top speed.

    Just my thoughts. Thanx for indulging me.

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Glen L klondike

    Mornin', dgrason. Having built a couple small Glen-L boats I also like the company and many of their designs but there seem to be quite a few people for whom Glen-L is one of those outfits they love to hate as a sort of 'big box' store for home builders. I don't find that criticism very rational or deserved. But personally I find one shortcoming of Glen-L is that many of the designs are dated aesthetically, meaning the designs reflect passing trends as opposed to lines that are more ageless in the imaginations of many homebuilders. That doesn't make them poor designs but it does tend to make them look like pre-owned and second hand pleasure craft before they are even built and not in a good way. And the builders who built them tended to follow the aethetics of those times such as painting them all white. I think Klondike is a good example of a design that suffers a bit from that. I think most who are attracted to this forum tend towards designs that capture a hard to define aethetic of salty tradition or timeless classicism. For example compare Klondike



    to the workboat romanitcism of some of Sam Devlin's larger trawlers such as Sockeye



    or Kokanee



    My favourite of the Glen-L trawlers is Odyssea



    As for the resale value of a home built boat the issue is not how well the boat was actually built but how well it is perceived to have been built or just the fact that its almost impossible to determine the quality one way or another. Buyers do not want to deal with such troublesome question marks. Cheers, Jim.
    Last edited by JimD; 12-03-2008 at 08:31 AM.

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Glen L klondike

    Its just a fact of life that not everyone will agree even with home designs. Homebuilt vessels have a certain value no matter the profile appearance. Few folks build with resales in mind. If designers jumped everytime a luster of color portraits was critical, you would end up with experiemental hulls everyday and fewer sucessfully built boats and fewer sales too with disgrunted owners. There is already one such plans seller in the market these days. Glen-L is very successfull from evidence of how many years in business?

    I have experienced that you must stick to what you are good at and what your own business plans tells you at the end of the year. When you change profiles, especially in the cabin boats, you also deal with a lot more than just a sheerline or bottom redesigns. By comparison how many large plans are actually sold by comparison to the smaller ones? There are a lot of hours involved in suttle changes.

  17. #17
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    Default Re: Glen L klondike

    I bought those plans back in the '70's. After a few calls to Glen-L, I decided to work towards building it.

    Ken Hankinson was there then, he said, for one guy, fairly well equipped, good knowledge of woodworking procedures ( some pretty involved), to figure 5000 to 6000 hours to build Klondike, longer if a little short in some of the above areas. That's 2 1/2 to 3 years, full time.

    I still have the plans, but never did build it. Ken had called me, and had a customer in Port Townsend that had the frames done, all the other parts milled, and several bunks of marine ply, then had stroke or something. Was selling all for a song. The hassle of flying out there, one way truck (large) to Mi. made the deal a little less attractive for me. Didn't hear what happened later.

    Dave

    P.S.- An Alaskan 49 is a pretty close clone as I recall, though the one I saw had a planked hull, and twin inboards.

  18. #18
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    Default Re: Glen L klondike

    Quote Originally Posted by JimD View Post
    ... but there seem to be quite a few people for whom Glen-L is one of those outfits they love to hate as a sort of 'big box' store for home builders..
    I agree that folks will believe what they want. But as far as Glen-L being a "big box" store, NOTHING could be further from the truth. lol It truly is a small, family operation. ...albeit showing many designs from some very talented minds.

    Quote Originally Posted by JimD View Post
    ... personally I find one shortcoming of Glen-L is that many of the designs are dated aesthetically, meaning the designs reflect passing trends as opposed to lines that are more ageless in the imaginations of many homebuilders..
    Ok, I can see that. But from a boatbuilder's perspective, these are not passing trends, but rather, starting points for each builder to use his own creativity. So many, many times on our forum, many builders have talked about picking the one design that comes the closest to what they have in mind and then modifying that design in new and unique ways. Many times some very inovative boats have appeared as a result.

    On the other hand, and this is the case with me personally, the old design is EXACTLY I'm looking for. I'm tired of going to the river or lake and seeing the latest in plastic fashions. I want something that will draw a crowd at the dock this summer, next summer and for many years to come. Much like old Harley Davidsons, you can have for one for decades and it never goes out of style. Many of the Glen-L designs will do just that.

    Quote Originally Posted by JimD View Post
    =....to the workboat romanitcism of some of Sam Devlin's larger trawlers such as Sockeye

    Oh God, I feel ya here, Dude. Is this not one of the MOST beautiful trawlers in existence? I bought one of Devlin's stitch & glue books about 8 or 9 years ago and found his site almost as soon as it was put up. I immediately fell in love with the Sockeye 45.

    However, just as has been stated, Devlin doesn't make his plans available. So that means that I will never have one because I'm not wealthy enough to ever pay someone else to build one for me.

    On the other hand, I could build a Klondike and with some imaginative use of brightwork, paint other than white, and trim, it could be every bit as classy as the Devlin boats. In fact, as an example, take a look at the Glen-L boat here:

    Quote Originally Posted by JimD View Post
    Here the builder has already used mahogany for the handrails, window surrounds, door trim, etc. Now picture this boat just as it is except the topsides from the sheer to waterline are painted an deep airforce blue with a deep red bootstripe.

    Or. What about painting from sheer to chine in black and all the areas that are white now, would be painted a light beige or sand color. Combined with the brightwork, Sam Devlin would be biting his shorts.

    I'm just saying that an overwhelming majority of the guys that build their own boats, have incredible imaginations and talent. They're definately in a league of their own.

  19. #19
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    Default Re: Glen L klondike

    dgrason.....the builder stated that they would build the boat for resale....and Glen-L designs are recognized as "kit boats" so the resale would be questionable...right, wrong, or indifferent, that is the perception. A similar design by a well known architect will have more going for it, plus if the construction is very good it will get more attention. It's like two boats sitting side by side, nearly identical....one by Bruce Roberts, and one by Nat Herreshoff....which one will sell first or get the most attention, all other things being equal.
    Wakan Tanka Kici Un
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  20. #20
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    Default Re: Glen L klondike

    I believe devlin does sell his plans at least most of them for homebuilding. see this link for one I really like

    http://www.devlinboat.com/topknot32.htm

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