Is anybody familiar with this boat or know if any have been built. The plans arrived from www.dngoodchild.com yesterday.

CORSAIR--A GLOUCESTER SCHOONER ... A 42-ft. schooner that is fast and seaworthy, offers comfortable accomodations and is low in building cost.
Howard I. Chapelle, 25 pages, 5 plate(s), Pub No. 5335,

5335--CORSAIR
by J.A. Emmett
A 42-ft. Gloucester schooner designed by IL I. Chapelle, that is fast and seaworthy, offers comfortable accommodations and is low in building cost.

The Gloucester-type fishing schooner, still popular in Nova Scotia today and years back along the New England coast, was used as a model for the lines and, rig of Corsair in order to meet a combination of rather unusual requirements. The first of these, ability and comfort in rough, water with a good turn of speed, are fairly common. However, the boat also had to have comfortable year-round living accommodations and yet be small enough for easy handling by a crew of two in summer cruising along the Atlantic coast. Added to these needs, was the fact that since the boat would be in constant operation, upkeep had to be low and any maintenance done by the owner. Most important of all, was the necessity of keeping the building cost as low as possible without sacrificing either the quality of materials or the construction. Now let’s take a look at the lines and body plan of Corsair Sand see what they’re like. They show a round-bottom hull with easy lines, graceful sheer and a long and well-shaped run that makes her fast for her size and type. Freeboard is high to keep the decks dry and the long, straight keel makes her an easy boat to hold to a course. The overall length on deck is 40 ft. 7˝ in., beam 10 ft. 1˝ in., the draft 4 ft. 10˝ in. and displacement about 23,500 lbs. All ballast with the exception of an iron grounding shoe, is carried inside, fisherman fashion, and totals about 6 tons. Her rig is a typical gaff-headed, schooner type with 742 sq. ft. of sail area in the three lowers, divided up with 139 sq. ft. in the jib, 260 sq. ft. in the foresail and 343 sq. ft. in the main. Both of the solid masts are set up with lanyards and deadeyes in keeping with the period, and all sheets run aft to the cockpit for easy handling.



Thanks,
Barry