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Thread: Sailing Redmond's Whisp

  1. #1
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    Default Sailing Redmond's Whisp

    Now that I know how to sail it, its great. I'm using my original melonseed rig with 1 reef point. I was doing everything wrong before. I got rid of the ballast and sit on the floor and it's a gas.

    The yahoo video conversion reduces the quality quite a bit - it's hard to read the gps but at the end it maxed out at 7.5 knots.

    http://video.yahoo.com/watch/3302319/9289378

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Sailing Redmond's Whisp

    Whisp - always one of my fave pulling boat designs, but your sailing rig is surprisingly stable!
    "The enemies of reason have a certain blind look."
    Doctor Jacquin to Lieutenant D'Hubert, in Ridley Scott's first major film _The Duellists_.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Sailing Redmond's Whisp

    I too must confess my surprise. I always liked the Whisp. Even considered it before choosing the Goat Island Skiff to build with my boys. One of the reasons w decided against it was I thought it was primarily a Row Boat with much lesser sailing & motoring capabilities. Yours looks great.


    "Hegel was right when he said that we learn from history that man can never learn anything from history" -- G.B. Shaw

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Sailing Redmond's Whisp

    Wow. She flies. That must be exhilarating.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Sailing Redmond's Whisp

    She was a dog until I learned how to sail her. I weigh 2x as much as the boat so keeping my weight low and at the widest part of the hull just behind the rowing thwart makes a huge difference. (I weigh 170 - 175# depending on how many muffins I've had recently). I have to get a tiller extension -I just put a new larger rudder on - I did not build the original rudder per the plans as I did not want a non-kickup rudder projecting below the skeg. I reused a melonseed rig I already had and put in a much heavier mast step which is braced like a star-fish to the chines. I had read on a previous thread someone commenting that the boat was so flexible under sail that it was scary. I was already concerned about the lightweight hull racking under sail so I added a V brace under the rowing thwart that is through bolted to the keel with a SS tee nut. I also added some fillers, and gussets where the forward 2 thwart rests meet either the top strake or inware respectivly. These added very little weight but strengthened those connections. But these are all details, I would expect the boat as designed to sail just as well - just rack a bit more.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Sailing Redmond's Whisp

    Phil - that is lovely!
    I built a Whisp for a friend a bunch of years ago, strictly for rowing, at which it is superb. Some years later he cobbled up a sailing rig from an old Dyer sail which he was given, but it didn't sail nearly as nicely as yours.
    In particular, your lee-board rig is far superior to what he did, and it looks like the board itself is larger and shaped very nicely. Any problems locking it down or getting it up/off?

    (his boat was stolen about a year after he added the rig, so there was no opportunity for making it better - sad...)

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Sailing Redmond's Whisp

    I got this boat from someone who started it 10 years ago and never finished it and it just sat there. When I got it some of the leeboard hardware was there but not the angle and bolt that the leeboard attaches to the cross brace. I got a piece of 2" steel angle with a couple of 1/4" square braces welded to it so I substituted the missing piece of hardware but otherwise it's exactly according to the plans. I had a left over 1/4" SS bolt with a plastic 4 pointed handle that captures the nut and that really wasn't enough to get leverage so I made up a 1/4 plywood lever about 6" long with the plastic handle set 1/2 way into it - so the plywood lever gives me enough leverage. I keep it just tight enough to keep the board down so if I hit something it will kickup and not rip out my inwale. The important part is to get the wedges on the underside of the crossbar to match the top surface of the wales exactly and also I put some fiberglass under the wales where the crossbar clamp presses on them. The idea is not to twist or crush the wales. It works well.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Sailing Redmond's Whisp

    I'm 175 lbs. and normally sit with my back against the rear seat (the edge of which I padded with a FunNoodle) and I replaced the tiller with a push-pull tiller, which makes steering much nicer than trying to steer over one's shoulder, even with a hiking stick. I suppose if I sat further forward I might not need this, but then I'd be sitting on the foot braces for rowing that I glued to the bottom of the boat. I use a 5 gallon plastic gas can filled with water from the lake for stability, securing it under the middle seat. Guess this serves the same purpose that your sitting further forward does.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Sailing Redmond's Whisp

    I sit that way going downwind but reaching or going upwind it is much more stable sitting up forward and if the wind is steady I can lean against the side - which is comfortable as it has a lot of flair - that is the configuration that really is an improvement over stationary ballast - 175# movable vs 50# stationary. I'm also traveling 50# lighter and it is that much easier to plane. I was using a rope tiller and so I could sit forward, now I just put in a larger rudder but did not hook back up the rudder lines and I'm going to try a tiller extension. I also never got to putting in rowing footrests so they are not in the way and I think they would actually be aft of that forward sitting position on the floor - they would certainly help for rowing.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Sailing Redmond's Whisp

    Some boats have used rope tillers that go in a circle around the cockpit as they pass through various blocks (which for you would be located port and starboard aft of the middle seat/thwart, and perhaps also two more aft near the transom), hooked up to a piece of wood at the top of the rudder which is parallel to the transom and perhaps 24" or so wide overall. Using this you could easily steer from any seated position. As it is now, even a tiller extension makes it hard to steer when your back is facing the transom, at least on my boat (whose tiller is likely a few inches lower than yours). Enjoyed the video. Filming and sailing at the same time must have been a challenge!

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Sailing Redmond's Whisp

    I had mine running just as you describe but at the transom it went through it just below the inwale and then to the end of a stick that was attached to the rudder stock. This stick points out directly aft. The problem with it is I need to get some handles on the rope so that I can pull on it - either dowel's set as tee handles or wrist straps. But nothing beats a tiller and I think a tiller extension running over my shoulder will not be uncomfortable to push or pull on while facing forward but I'll have to try it to find out. Or maybe 1 wrist strap for each hand, the main sheet in my teeth and I can operate the camera with my toes. I will probably bring this boat to our Union Lake Messabout on Sept 6th instead of my melonseed if you want to try it.

  12. #12
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    Alberta Canada
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    Default Re: Sailing Redmond's Whisp

    Wow. She was moving right along and seemed rock-solid. Looks like fun!

    Dale

    www.alistego.com

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Sailing Redmond's Whisp

    Well sometimes she was starting to rock side to side when it really gets going, I do not have enough experience at that speed yet to know if that was the waves as I was not running directly downwind, or the rig, or my inexperience-overreacting, or trying to film at the same time or just the gusts. A little after the end of the filming it did overpower me and I let go the sheet, the sail just blew out like flag and everthing was fine, I could pull in the sheet and get going again. I have not dumped the boat, I imagine it would take very little flotation in the right place - maybe along the side with the leeboard to right it easily as it is so light.

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Sailing Redmond's Whisp

    I tied FunNoodles under the aft and forward seats as an easy way to add flotation. Stacked them up three under the seat and as wide as the caned part of the seat, then two parallel to these between noodles 1 and 2, and 2 and 3, thus from the side it was an inverted triangle with two layers of noodles. Tied them to pexiglass pieces at the ends that had holes drilled to accept the lines through the holes in the FunNoodles. The entire flotation unit then ties under the seat.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/lansdow...7601922109261/
    Last edited by Steve Lansdowne; 08-17-2008 at 04:45 PM.

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Sailing Redmond's Whisp

    Nice video. I weigh a bit less than you and find holding my Whisp down in stronger air more of a challenge. The water comes up to the rail pretty quickly in the gusts -- and I get the seas running up the face of the leeboard and in over the side as your video shows it. I was going to look for a solution, but then realized it's a pretty good warning to ease off a bit.

    I put a 5-gallon container of water up in the bow when I'm solo, and sit on a boat cushion on the floor, leaning against the aft thwart. That keeps the trim right for me and keeps the boat's head up in the wind.

    How about jibing? That's by far the spookiest maneuver in this boat. The sail comes right across and wants to pull the boat over with it.

    The feel of my boat, performance-wise, is pretty exactly what I see in the video. It feels plenty quick. But when the Thistles, Lightnings and such-like show up on the local lake they far outpace what I can get my Whisp to do. Are they having more fun? I doubt it.

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Sailing Redmond's Whisp

    Jibing is not the thing to do if you can help it, though I'll admit that sometimes ...

    I once had the sail do a 270 degree rotation around the mast, which I solved by letting go the sheet and somehow grabbing it when it came around to the other side!

  17. #17
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    Default Re: Sailing Redmond's Whisp

    Steve, your boat is beautiful, mine is very rough by comparison, your garage hoist is perfect, I need to set up something just like that.
    Woxbox, I was toying with the idea of a leeboard rub rail below the pivot bolt but not for the purpose of actually holding off the leeboard but more to try and deflect the water shooting off the leeboard so you would not have to ease off.
    And I avoid jibing unless the wind is light.

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