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Thread: New build, The Lawton Tender

  1. #1
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    Default New build, The Lawton Tender

    I'm taking a break from my Hacker project to build this !0' Lawton Tender for a friend who lives aboard his boat.
    The design is published in Gardners book Building Classic Small Craft.
    The boat will be strip planked in Mahogany and Altlantic cedar.
    The plans:



    The goal:



    I lofted the plans full size and used the pick up stick method to make patterns of each station.






  2. #2
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    Default Re: New build, The Lawton Tender

    The patterns are complete for all stations, next will be the stem and building the molds and strongbaack. I plan to pattern route the molds on my router table so I made a good set of plywood patterns so I can build another boat .I
    I'll post the progress as the project goes forward.
    So far about 16 hrs invested.





    The patterns for the molds

  3. #3
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    Default Re: New build, The Lawton Tender

    Ooh, this is going to be a good one. Thanks Rob, pretty boat.


    Steven

  4. #4
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    Default Re: New build, The Lawton Tender

    Quote Originally Posted by StevenBauer View Post
    Ooh, this is going to be a good one. Thanks Rob, pretty boat.


    Steven
    Oh ya

  5. #5
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    Default Re: New build, The Lawton Tender

    I started to build the strong back today . I decided to use a technique that canoe builders use for the strongback as space in my shop is very limited, and this a dingy.
    I followed a method in the book, Canoecraft by Ted Moore.
    The strongback will allow me to exapand it for future boats and take up a smaller footprint in my small shop.
    I cut the plywood into 8x8 x 8' strips and laid out the box beam on my bench.



    After a dry fit, I guled and screwed the assembly together. This is where my 7' ft 4"bench which is dead flat, paid off in a perfect alignment of the parts.



    I made three sections, the first is 8'ft long and another 3' ft long. I then made a connecting section to that acts like a sleeve to join the box beam into a dead straight 11' ft long beam, which can also be expanded for a longer boat.
    The completed box beam.


  6. #6
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    Default Re: New build, The Lawton Tender

    Next, was the cutting the parts for the legs and feet. After referencing the lofting, I made the finished height of the strongback at 28". This will put the top of the form about 54", a comfortable working height for me.
    I used the gables in the box beam to laminate the feet and and overbuilt the box beam a little heavier, for a future larger boat. ( 14' lapstrake wherry).
    I then made a 12" wide top and screwed it to the strongback and carefully aligned the edges with a tight straight line.
    The completed backbone is 11 ft long.






    Next, will be the building of the molds and set up.
    Last edited by Robmill0605; 07-10-2008 at 09:12 PM.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: New build, The Lawton Tender

    Damn, you're good!

  8. #8
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    Default Re: New build, The Lawton Tender

    Nice going. I like the strongback. The heavy plywood guarantees a straight and flat platform.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: New build, The Lawton Tender

    Quote Originally Posted by JimD View Post
    Nice going. I like the strongback. The heavy plywood guarantees a straight and flat platform.

    Thanks, I laid out a strongback/baseline line above the lofted hull to be able to reference building the molds and make set up easier.

    I'm tweaking the lofting right now, I usually take a break when I'm finished lofting, and then go back to examine the lofting and patterns for errors with a fresh set of eyes.
    I think the extra time spent here to get this off the ground right, will pay huge divdends later in the construction of this tender.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: New build, The Lawton Tender

    I think i'm going to like this thread .
    Location : London , Thames .

  11. #11
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    Default Re: New build, The Lawton Tender

    Looks a bit tippy, Rob.

    Wider feet with some diagonal braces, perhaps?

  12. #12
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    Default Re: New build, The Lawton Tender

    This ,I'm going to enjoy ! thanks Robmill
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  13. #13
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    Default Re: New build, The Lawton Tender

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Ledger View Post
    Looks a bit tippy, Rob.

    Wider feet with some diagonal braces, perhaps?
    Well, I'm 6' 6" tall, and I weigh 350lbs, and I stood on it and tried to rock it, seems ok.....
    ( of course my wife came out just when I got up there, " what the hell are you doing" .........
    Scary how they manage to catch you isn't it?
    Anyway, the tender weighs about 80lbs, and since I overbuilt the strongback and the legs are sandwiched between the gables it seems ok.
    Good idea about the diagonals though Jim, I'll probably add them for a larger project.

    I'm building the molds today, and will post any progress later.
    So far about 23 hrs. total time consumed.

  14. #14
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    Default Re: New build, The Lawton Tender

    [quote=Robmill0605;1889569]Well, I'm 6' 6" tall, and I weigh 350lbs, and I stood on it and tried to rock it, seems ok.....
    ( of course my wife came out just when I got up there, " what the hell are you doing" .........
    quote]


    No use trying to explain the nature of rigourous scientific testing to a skeptic, is it?

    Carry on.

  15. #15
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    Default Re: New build, The Lawton Tender

    Quote Originally Posted by Robmill0605 View Post
    Thanks, I laid out a strongback/baseline line above the lofted hull to be able to reference building the molds and make set up easier.

    I'm tweaking the lofting right now, I usually take a break when I'm finished lofting, and then go back to examine the lofting and patterns for errors with a fresh set of eyes.
    I think the extra time spent here to get this off the ground right, will pay huge divdends later in the construction of this tender.
    Agreed. My strongback that I have so far used to build two kayaks and a dinghy looks like this:



    The shelf underneath comes in handy for tools, etc.

  16. #16
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    Default Re: New build, The Lawton Tender

    Quote Originally Posted by JimD View Post
    Agreed. My strongback that I have so far used to build two kayaks and a dinghy looks like this:



    The shelf underneath comes in handy for tools, etc.
    Nice jig Jim, your to Rob , nice tender as well . Great thread !

  17. #17
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    Default Re: New build, The Lawton Tender

    Looks good Jim.

    I started working on the molds today. For those who are familiar with pattern routing this might be old news, but for for those that are interested in here is how I made the molds.
    The material for the molds is 1/2" sandply from the big box store. About 25 bucks. I like this material as the plys are good with few voids and it has a nice smooth surface.
    After arranging my patterns on the ply, I made allowances for the " legs" on each mold, taken from the lofting. I cut way outside the line and saw no more than 1/8" outside the lines on my band saw.





    I trim each mold close to the line in order to have as little as possible for the router bit to remove.
    I set up my router table ( which is built into the tablesaw extension) with a half inch diameter straight bit with a top bearing. I also set up the jig I use to hold my dust collection hose in place.



    Next, I fasten the half pattern on the centerline with a couple of drywall screws . The part is ready to route.

    Last edited by Robmill0605; 07-12-2008 at 03:29 PM.

  18. #18
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    Default Re: New build, The Lawton Tender

    Continued:

    I install a pin in the router base because if you do not have extra length in the mold to start the bit, it can try to grab the part from you and pull your hand into the bit.



    Here is the router bit following the pattern and cutting precisely on the line.







    Flip the pattern over, align on the centerline and route the other side.



    Here is the completed mold, cut perfectly on the lines and ready for the strongback. Follow the same procedure to complete the other stations.

    The finished mold.
    Last edited by Robmill0605; 07-12-2008 at 03:40 PM.

  19. #19
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    Default Re: New build, The Lawton Tender

    Rob, this is somewhat similar to what I just did for the catboat transom, although I didn't pattern rout it. The thing I'd watch out for is using the centerline alone to align the pattern. Maybe you're not, I can't tell. But what happened to me was a slight misalignment of the waterlines as I flipped the pattern over to mark the second side. The solution, for me, will be to mark the waterlines on the mold stock before applying the pattern. I would have more confidence in the waterlines as a guide than the centerline because a slight misalignment of the centerline moves the outside edge of the pattern to an uncomfortable degree.

    But, knowing you, I'm sure things are well in hand.

    Nice sequence, BTW

  20. #20
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    Default Re: New build, The Lawton Tender

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Ledger View Post
    Rob, this is somewhat similar to what I just did for the catboat transom, although I didn't pattern rout it. The thing I'd watch out for is using the centerline alone to align the pattern. Maybe you're not, I can't tell. But what happened to me was a slight misalignment of the waterlines as I flipped the pattern over to mark the second side. The solution, for me, will be to mark the waterlines on the mold stock before applying the pattern. I would have more confidence in the waterlines as a guide than the centerline because a slight misalignment of the centerline moves the outside edge of the pattern to an uncomfortable degree.

    But, knowing you, I'm sure things are well in hand.

    Nice sequence, BTW

    Thanks Jim, you are correct of course. I should have mentioned that I also use the waterlines on the patterns for reference, and not just the centerline. I also mark the waterlines on the molds.
    I really like the pattern routing method and i use it wherever I can as it is very accurate, very quick, and eliminates a lot of work if you are also carefull to make fair patterns from the lofting.

    I'm also really enjoying your build on your catboat .

  21. #21
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    Default Re: New build, The Lawton Tender

    Great looking job so far! I have a quick question for you-- how did you cut the patterns out? Bandsaw? I like the idea of making a pattern to route the mold, but it seems to me that, like most tasks involving a router, you need the pattern to make the pattern.

    Is there a step I'm missing, or were they just cut with a bandsaw/jigsaw and sanded?

  22. #22
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    Default Re: New build, The Lawton Tender

    Quote Originally Posted by cflrich View Post
    Great looking job so far! I have a quick question for you-- how did you cut the patterns out? Bandsaw? I like the idea of making a pattern to route the mold, but it seems to me that, like most tasks involving a router, you need the pattern to make the pattern.

    Is there a step I'm missing, or were they just cut with a bandsaw/jigsaw and sanded?
    Thank you, the pattern was cut in the first section i posted. I used a method called the pick up stick. You make a pointer like these that have enough space under them to allow you to slip your pattern material under the pointer which I nailed to the lofting.
    ( I used 1/4" luan ply).
    Then you place the pointer directly over the lofted station line. I use ice picks to hold a flexiible batten and draw the line on the pattern.
    The whole thing looks like this:



    From here it goes to my bench, where I use a spokeshave and then a thin piece of ply with sandpaper glued to it and split the line.
    You then check it against the lofting and mark it carefully for waterlines. Now you have an accurate pattern.
    I arranged the patterns on a sheet of 1/2" ply and cut an inch outside the line with a jigsaw. I then take the part to the bandsaw and saw 1/8" outside the line and them pattern route.



    The reason I go through all this trouble, is that it gives me a set of permanet patterns, and it makes short work on the molds. I don't have to spokeshave and sand to the line on 1/2" plywood for each mold.
    I hope that helps.
    Last edited by Robmill0605; 07-14-2008 at 07:54 AM.

  23. #23
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    Default Re: New build, The Lawton Tender

    I made some progress on the stem mold. The stem will be laminated so I made a mold for it.




    I did a preliminary set up on the strongback to check my work on the molds.
    I set up outside of my shop so i could get a good look all the way around. I used a batten ot check the molds for fairness.








    Back in the shop and ready to finalize the setup and bevel the stations. Then I can actually start the construction.


  24. #24
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    Default Re: New build, The Lawton Tender

    For those who are still interested, I made some progress on the tender. I set up the mold/ station for the stem and laminated the inner stem out of 5 pieces of 1 1/4" x 1/4"honduras mahogany .

    The mold station, ready to laminate the inner stem.



    I let the stem dry for 24 hrs. and removed it from the mold. I used a scraper to remove the excess epoxy, and milled one side flat on my 1950 Northfield jointer that I restored a few years ago.



    with one side perfectly flat, I ran the other side through my planer and attached the inner stem to the mold with a couple of finish nails which will be removed later.
    Finally, the first piece of wood for the actual boat.



    Next, I used a long batten to bevel each station mold. I set the centerline on the stem and bevel lines and beveled the stem halfway up. After sringing a batten along the sheer on both sides of the hull, I finally got a look at her shape.




  25. #25
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    Default Re: New build, The Lawton Tender

    Sweet .............jointer / molds / shape!Thats some fine Ole iron there

  26. #26
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    Default Re: New build, The Lawton Tender

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Girouard View Post
    Sweet .............jointer / molds / shape!Thats some fine Ole iron there
    Thanks Paul, I just love the thing, here is the before and after.....

    Before restoration,



    After...


  27. #27
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    Default Re: New build, The Lawton Tender

    Does it have three knifes or two?

    That Tenders gonna be a nice boat as well .

  28. #28
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    Default Re: New build, The Lawton Tender

    Thanks, it has three knives. it's the 8" model. I completely disassembled it and restored it from the bottom up, works perfect.

  29. #29
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    Default Re: New build, The Lawton Tender

    Here is a link to the thread I did on the jointers restoration;

    http://www.woodenboat.com/forum/showthread.php?t=50704
    Last edited by Robmill0605; 07-25-2008 at 11:21 PM.

  30. #30
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    Default Re: New build, The Lawton Tender

    Wow, not only is this a very informative thread, its also really inspiring. I just can't believe how you cleaned up that jointer.

  31. #31
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    Default Re: New build, The Lawton Tender

    It is a marvelous looking restoration! Do the lights in your neighborhood dim when you start it up?

  32. #32
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    Default Re: New build, The Lawton Tender

    lol, yeah it's a real powerhouse. Sounds like a F-14 as it winds up to speed.....

    I'm looking for a big ,cast iron, old band saw to do the same thing with.

  33. #33
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    Default Re: New build, The Lawton Tender

    Still very interested. This is a great thread. Are there wheels used in moving the strongback, and if so, how is that done?

  34. #34
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    Default Re: New build, The Lawton Tender

    Quote Originally Posted by htom View Post
    Still very interested. This is a great thread. Are there wheels used in moving the strongback, and if so, how is that done?

    Good question, I did not want to use wheels , but I still need to shove this around because I'm up to my eyeballs as a dedicated packrat.

    I found a level area on my concrete shop floor and marked the position of the strongback legs on the floor with a magic marker.
    Now I can move the strongback and get it back in postion again so I know it's level.
    I've made several " sleds" that I use on all my heavy machines. I made a sled for each leg on the strongback so it slides when i push it, but stays put when I'm working.
    Here is how i made them:
    Cut a piece of plywood (3/4") one inch larger , all the way around than the machines base, or in this case the legs. Screw a one inch wide piece of hardwood all the way around the edge. Go down to a plastic supplier and ask for a 3/4" thick piece of UHMW plastic about a foot square. Cut it into 4 pieces 3"x3" square and bevel the edges with a router with a 45 degree bit.
    Pre-drill and countersink four screws into each block and fasten it to the four corners of the sled. The bevel will allow the base sled to slide over any rough spots or cracks in the floor easily. The UHMW
    ( ultra high molecular weight) plastic holds it's grip like sandpaper unless you push it firmly. Then it slides.
    I have it under my 1150lb. jointer and I can move it around my shop by myself, but it doesn't move when in place. I've used it for a couple years now and it works great. About 10 bucks and some scraps to make, it looks like this:

    Last edited by Robmill0605; 07-27-2008 at 11:25 AM.

  35. #35
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    Default Re: New build, The Lawton Tender

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Girouard View Post
    Thats some fine Ole iron there
    Arn. I believe it's referred to as Arn, on the Old Wood Working Machines Club site.

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