Results 1 to 27 of 27

Thread: who killed the grand banks

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    52 50 w
    Posts
    12,150

    Default who killed the grand banks

    Who Killed the Grand Banks The Untold Story Behind the Decimation of One of the World's Greatest Natural Resources

    "While researching the book, Rose says, he moved from incredulity to outrage as he uncovered the true story of who is responsible for catastrophic pillaging of the Grand Banks cod, once one of the Great Natural Wonders of the world. "
    " In one chapter, he slams dfo as "an agency that couldn't manage a home aquarium."

    Book Description

    While John Cabot's landfall may be in dispute, what he discovered is not: cod-and lots of them...

    Historic accounts say that Cabot lowered a basket weighted with stones into the North Atlantic, then hauled it back up brimming with cod. The discovery of these fertile fishing grounds set off a centuries-long struggle among Basque, Portuguese, French, and English fishermen, and established a pattern of far-flung coastal settlements, called outports by Newfoundlanders, that ring the island.


    And so the legend fits today: the Grand Banks became Valhalla, a miraculous, self-sustaining Eight Wonder of the world, feeding the known world for 500 years.


    The catastrophic collapse of the fisheries, circa 1992, was unprecedenteed. An ecological disaster to rival any other-the destruction of the Amazonian rainforest notwithstanding-in modern history. This made-in-Canada plunder was part human greed, part stupidity, and part rapacity. Tarnishing Canada's standing within the international community, it holds the reputation of Canada's once-vaunted fisheries scientists up to ridicule. Sixteen years later, no one has taken accountability or apologized for the ruination of a centuries-old way of life and, taken accountability or apologized for the ruination of a centuries-old way of life and, more shocking, a stock recovery plan has yet to be produced...


    There can be no forgetting-or forgiving-such catastrophic pillaging, Sparked by a second wave of environmentalism focusing on the state of the world's oceans, the Grand Banks cod collapse became a talking point, a sujet noir, now studied at universities and fisheries research centres, wherein students from around the world repeat this mantra: we must never allow our fisheries to go the way of the Grand Banks cod.


    The end came officially on July 2, 1992: John Crosbie, Canada’s Minister of Fisheries and Oceans, announced a moratorium on Northern cod stocks. For half a millennium, the Grand Banks cod had sustained international fishing fleets, boosted the world’s economy, become the flash point in power politics, and was the lifeblood of generations of villages perched on rocky outcrops along the Newfoundland coast.



    What happened? For 16 years, accountability has been dodged. The media has been mute. Successive governments buried the shameful tale under layers of secrecy, subsidies and the “good news” story of off-shore oil.


    The new cod-fishing fleets – technological juggernauts with the capacity to ravage a sea floor – have denied responsibility. A few courageous marine biologists have spoken up, only to find themselves squarely in the sights of government censors. The in-shore fishery – the small-boat fishermen who plied the cold waters of the Banks for generations – now reflect bitterly on better times.


    When they saw the stocks decline – and their livelihood with it – they sounded the first alarm, but apparently no one was listening.
    Alex Rose asks who is listening now. The answer to who killed the Grand Banks just might be another alarm bell for us today, signaling future environmental and ecosystem destruction. And while theories abound as to what caused the catastrophic collapse – botched science, timorous and fluctuating political will, a boom in the seal population -- it is indisputable that the ecosystem of the cold Grand Bank waters has changed dramatically.


    Despite a decade of rhetorical hand wringing, served up with dollops of Canadian official denial, Rose has salvaged one hard truth: the Grand Banks cod fishery was wiped out because of made-in-Canada greed and willful blindness. In a frenzy of collective hysteria, Canadians created an environmental catastrophe here on our own shore.


    As the oil sands exploration gouges the landscape of northern Alberta, as overfishing hammers stocks of Pacific salmon, the fate of the Grand Banks has become a cautionary tale now told around the world. There’s a price to pay when a society ignores its role as a steward of the environment. This book poses the question of our generation: will the ecological disaster that befell the Northern cod happen again?



    Alex Rose is a Vancouver-based writer and journalist who helped to write three Royal Commissions and Provincial Inquiries, including one on Canadian fisheries which resulted in changes to public policy. A contributor to the National Post Saturday Review, The Toronto Globe and Mail, and BC Business Magazine, he co-authored North of Cape Caution, an investigation of ecotourism opportunities on the British Columbia coast. His book, Nisga’a: People of the Nass River, won the 1993 Roderick Haig-Brown B.C. Book Prize and his essay, In Search of Meaning, was shortlisted for Canada’s 2004 National Magazine Award.






  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Pittsburgh, Pa.
    Posts
    3,746

    Default Re: who killed the grand banks

    I'd like to blame the Bushes, evidence or no.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 1999
    Location
    Broken Arrow, OK US
    Posts
    6,648

    Default Re: who killed the grand banks

    "The catastrophic collapse of the fisheries, circa 1992, was unprecedenteed."

    The dinosaurs certainly are a precedent. The environment changed. The creatures did not. They died out.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Fredericton, New Brunswick
    Posts
    42,037

    Default Re: who killed the grand banks

    Canada's always tried to make itself the good guy in the story ... wish it were true. Yeah, the line is more complex than simply "Blame Canada," as overfishing in the offshore parts of the fishery has occurred with the fleets of many nations.

    But while Canada instituted a 200 mile limit, ostensibly to protect the cod from overfishing, the upshot was that overfishing and destructive fishing techologies were condoned within the limit, by Canadian license holders.

    Others know more of the story than I ... but we certainly allowed greed to overshadow good sense, and a resource which provided a plentiful, sustainable harvest for centuries was wiped out essentially in a generation of industrial scale fishing.
    If I use the word "God," I sure don't mean an old man in the sky who just loves the occasional goat sacrifice. - Anne Lamott

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Chesapeake Beach, Md 20732 U.S.A.
    Posts
    26,724

    Default Re: who killed the grand banks

    Research the "Cod Wars" of Iceland......
    Wakan Tanka Kici Un
    ..a bad day sailing is a heckuva lot better than the best day at work.....
    Fighting Illegal immigration since 1492....
    Live your life so that whenever you lose, you're ahead."
    "If you live life right, death is a joke as far as fear is concerned."

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    52 50 w
    Posts
    12,150

    Default Re: who killed the grand banks

    posts 5 and 6 are very good and directly to the point



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Pleasant Valley NS Canada
    Posts
    21,132

    Default Re: who killed the grand banks

    As TomF mentioned above, there are many authors of this calamity. I haven't read Mr. Rose's book, but I'm sure he has done his homework and makes a strong case for his conclusions. There is one point in the synopsis/excerpts that Popeye has generously taken the time to post that I would like to comment upon, though:

    "In one chapter, he slams dfo as "an agency that couldn't manage a home aquarium."
    and...

    "...it holds the reputation of Canada's once-vaunted fisheries scientists up to ridicule."
    Although DFO (the federal Department of Fisheries and Oceans, for those folks who don't follow our govenment's fascination with acronyms) certainly did play a large part in the collapse of the fishery, it wasn't the scientists that dropped the ball. The senior DFO management gerrymandered the scientific reports coming out of the North West Atlantic Fisheries Research Station (NWAFRS) in St. John's to suit the political needs of their federal and provincial masters. I know this because I was there, with an inside view.

    From 1978 through to 1983 I proof-read read several draft reports on the state of the Northern Cod Stock as determined by the scientists working at NWAFRS. Without exception, they all warned of the rapid decline of the stock, and decried the fishing pressure being placed upon the stock. At least two of these reports predicted the collapse of the fishery if the current fishing practices were not altered. These reports went unheeded in the political expediency of maintaining the status quo for several reasons.

    It was NOT the failure of the scientific community that contributed to the failure of the Northern Cod Stock, although the government of the day, when faced with the need to close the fishery, used the scientists as the whipping boy for their failure to heed the advice that they had been recieving for at least the previous decade. Greed and mis-management, certainly, but not scientific bumbling, AFAIK.
    Hope for the best, but plan for the worst.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    1,796

    Default Re: who killed the grand banks

    Quote Originally Posted by TomF
    ...a resource which provided a plentiful, sustainable harvest for centuries was wiped out essentially in a generation of industrial scale fishing.
    It should have been left to the free market...oh, I forgot, it was.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 1999
    Location
    New Hampshire Seacoast, USA
    Posts
    794

    Default Re: who killed the grand banks

    Coincidence that I read "Cod" by Mark Kurlansky this past week. Others here have also come to some of the same conclusions.

    Mark says," once the 200 mile limit was established in 1977, the Canadian Government saw a chance to make fishing a viable economic base for Newfoundland ... it first needed to settle its border with the USA and drive off the Europeans."

    The cod was fished to death, just as the Nantucket boats eliminated the whale. If we are smart, all day cod watching trips may bring in the tourist dollar.

    Very surprised to find product of Canada salted cod in the little pine box now packed in China at the same price as fresh stock at $8.99 US.

    abe

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Whidbey Island
    Posts
    12,848

    Default Re: who killed the grand banks

    in 2 words;


    Human Overpopulation
    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn't do, than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover." - Mark Twain

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 1999
    Location
    St. Paul, MN, USA
    Posts
    56,743

    Default Re: who killed the grand banks

    In 2 words: Human Overpopulation
    In two words: Human Stupidity.
    "For a successful technology, reality must take precedence over public relations,
    for nature cannot be fooled."

    Richard Feynman

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Pleasant Valley NS Canada
    Posts
    21,132

    Default Re: who killed the grand banks

    One begets the other, no?
    Hope for the best, but plan for the worst.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    13,623

    Default Re: who killed the grand banks

    Quote Originally Posted by mmd View Post
    One begets the other, no?
    Not necessarily. Over the long term, the growth of human population and the growth of human intelligence are correlated

    Kaa

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Pleasant Valley NS Canada
    Posts
    21,132

    Default Re: who killed the grand banks

    Really? I woulda thot that the wildly increasing population was evidence of an increase in the blinding stupidity of the species as a whole... <wink>

    You know... More people means more possibility of really dumb decisions. If one in ten recognizes the perils of overpopulation and restricts their number of progenty to two (zero population growth) and the other nine continue to breed like bunnies, the overall population growth continues unabated, and the next generation is weaned on the short-sightedness of the parents so that the wisdom of the few gets overwhelmed by a tidal wave of ignorance.

    I sound pretty cynical, don't I?
    Hope for the best, but plan for the worst.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Whidbey Island
    Posts
    12,848

    Default Re: who killed the grand banks

    Seems I know a lot of intelligent people who arent having kids, and a lot of no so intelligent people who breed like rabbits.
    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn't do, than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover." - Mark Twain

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Whidbey Island
    Posts
    12,848

    Default Re: who killed the grand banks

    Quote Originally Posted by Kaa View Post
    Not necessarily. Over the long term, the growth of human population and the growth of human intelligence are correlated

    Kaa
    if what you say is true, we should enhance the welfare system more to pay poor people who have kids even better.
    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn't do, than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover." - Mark Twain

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 1999
    Location
    St. Paul, MN, USA
    Posts
    56,743

    Default Re: who killed the grand banks

    Smaller populations give us more room to be stupid without really bad consequences. When there are lots of people, the margin for error is smaller.
    "For a successful technology, reality must take precedence over public relations,
    for nature cannot be fooled."

    Richard Feynman

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Deepest Darkest Wales
    Posts
    22,618

    Default Re: who killed the grand banks

    Quote Originally Posted by Kaa View Post
    Not necessarily. Over the long term, the growth of human population and the growth of human intelligence are correlated

    Kaa
    I'd like to see a demonstration that there has been an increase in human intelligence in the last three millennia - but I suspect that an impartial observer might need more patience.
    I'd much rather lay in my bunk all freakin day lookin at Youtube videos .

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    13,623

    Default Re: who killed the grand banks

    Quote Originally Posted by mmd View Post
    Really? I woulda thot that the wildly increasing population was evidence of an increase in the blinding stupidity of the species as a whole... <wink>
    Depends on what your (the species, that is) goal is. I doubt that it's the comfort of the the minority of the planet's population who happened to go through an industrial revolution first.

    Quote Originally Posted by mmd View Post
    You know... More people means more possibility of really dumb decisions. If one in ten recognizes the perils of overpopulation and restricts their number of progenty to two (zero population growth) and the other nine continue to breed like bunnies, the overall population growth continues unabated, and the next generation is weaned on the short-sightedness of the parents so that the wisdom of the few gets overwhelmed by a tidal wave of ignorance.

    I sound pretty cynical, don't I?
    No, actually not. You're just expressing the standard Malthus party line Also, it might be useful to consider how population genetics work, and how do genes wash out of the gene pool or stay in the gene pool :-)

    By the way, I would strongly argue against the proposition that not reproducing is wisdom while breeding is ignorance.

    Kaa

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    13,623

    Default Re: who killed the grand banks

    Quote Originally Posted by P.I. Stazzer-Newt View Post
    I'd like to see a demonstration that there has been an increase in human intelligence in the last three millennia - but I suspect that an impartial observer might need more patience.
    We'll need a definition of intelligence, which is a whole another can of worms, but I would put it to you that the world humans live in has gotten radically more complex and complicated (compared to three millenia ago) and that I would expect this to noticeably affect human intelligence. Besides, natural selection has been continuing as well.

    Kaa

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    13,623

    Default Re: who killed the grand banks

    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Wilson View Post
    Smaller populations give us more room to be stupid without really bad consequences. When there are lots of people, the margin for error is smaller.
    It's not an issue of population, it's an issue of how powerful your tools are. Small populations with powerful tools can produce enough bad consequences.

    Kaa

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Deepest Darkest Wales
    Posts
    22,618

    Default Re: who killed the grand banks

    Quote Originally Posted by Kaa View Post
    We'll need a definition of intelligence, which is a whole another can of worms, but I would put it to you that the world humans live in has gotten radically more complex and complicated (compared to three millenia ago) and that I would expect this to noticeably affect human intelligence. Besides, natural selection has been continuing as well.

    Kaa
    Some parts amy have become more complex - but the number of different things a human need to interact with may have fallen - so that the real day-to-day complexity is less.

    You are really hard put to poison yourself in the food department of a supermarket - take a look at your nearest ten co-workers and ask: "How many can tell the edible parts of the common umbelifera - and how many would die?"
    I'd much rather lay in my bunk all freakin day lookin at Youtube videos .

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    13,623

    Default Re: who killed the grand banks

    Quote Originally Posted by P.I. Stazzer-Newt View Post
    Some parts amy have become more complex - but the number of different things a human need to interact with may have fallen - so that the real day-to-day complexity is less.
    I disagree. Certainly, three thousand years ago people had a very different set of skills (do you have any specific culture in mind, by the way?) and had to deal with different problems, but I would argue that their world was considerably less complex.

    The fact that their skillsets look unusual to us does not necessarily imply they are more complicated than the ones we possess.

    Kaa

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Deepest Darkest Wales
    Posts
    22,618

    Default Re: who killed the grand banks

    Quote Originally Posted by Kaa View Post
    I disagree. Certainly, three thousand years ago people had a very different set of skills (do you have any specific culture in mind, by the way?) and had to deal with different problems, but I would argue that their world was considerably less complex.

    The fact that their skillsets look unusual to us does not necessarily imply they are more complicated than the ones we possess.

    Kaa
    Nor yet simpler.
    I'd much rather lay in my bunk all freakin day lookin at Youtube videos .

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Whidbey Island
    Posts
    12,848

    Default Re: who killed the grand banks

    so if we bump up the welfare system here to promote more children and do other things like remove birth control methods from the open market, etc the world will surely become a better place. Right Kaa?
    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn't do, than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover." - Mark Twain

  26. #26
    Join Date
    Oct 1999
    Location
    St. Paul, MN, USA
    Posts
    56,743

    Default Re: who killed the grand banks

    It's not an issue of population, it's an issue of how powerful your tools are.
    Both, I think.
    "For a successful technology, reality must take precedence over public relations,
    for nature cannot be fooled."

    Richard Feynman

  27. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    victoria, australia. (1 address now)
    Posts
    62,881

    Default Re: who killed the grand banks

    Over fishing, over everything for that matter is occurring round the world. Overpopulation of the human species and it's increasing demands on resources and the environment may be on a collision course though and one may 'cure' the other. It won't be fun though. Just take petrochemicals, take them out of the picture, or even just restrict their use and it would make the 1930's depression seem like a picnic. And it's not as though we haven't had plenty of warnings, but the human animal is not much better at forward planning than his pet dogs are. Short term profit rules, our technical mastery may yet prove our undoing. Any society that will 'sell' it's second most vital substance, water, to profit making business has no foresight at all.
    At 11 I made the decision that the world could do without my genes, the older I get the more sure I am I made the right decision.

Similar Threads

  1. Grand Banks 48 footers?
    By BrianW in forum Designs / Plans
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 10-19-2005, 06:08 PM
  2. Grand Banks 36
    By Don Philip in forum Designs / Plans
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 06-10-2003, 12:46 AM
  3. Hinkley or Grand Banks?
    By cmtacking in forum Designs / Plans
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 12-18-2002, 12:55 PM
  4. Grand Banks Alaskan
    By Steve Wyatt in forum Building / Repair
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 09-01-2002, 10:31 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •