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Thread: Lofting the Brewer catboat

  1. #4901
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    That second layer really assures there are no spots not covered with glass fabric, and not just resin.
    I love the smell of fresh cut plywood in the morning.

  2. #4902
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Depending on how you qualify strength... no, dynel is not as strong as equal-weight fiberglass cloth.

    It's better, though. Particularly for decks.
    No adversary is worse than bad advice.

  3. #4903
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Jim, not a topic drift - but a question asked in a 'wanting to add to knowledge' - what, if any, 'preventative maintenance' might you have been doing over the months / years to ensure that the engine is 'free' and the internals still rotate as they were designed to do ? - still following this impressive build and appreciating the documentation you are providing us.




    Rick

  4. #4904
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    8,098

    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Rich, the reason for going to two layers of Dynel has to do with impact resistance over just waterprooofing the deck. Also, Donald points out, two layers decreases the likelihood of unreinforced holes in the glass. With one layer of cloth I find it difficult to achieve a result that does not include a few sand-throughs of the mesh. There's on showing plainly in the photo.

    Rick, the Sabb has an oil cup conveniently located on the cylinder head which lubricates the upper cylinder. It's kept topped up and a few occasional turns of the starting handle with the compression release off keep things moving. This is not a fussy engine by any means.


  5. #4905
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    Arlington, Arizona
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Ahoy captain, pleasure to be speakin to you again, and I must say that your recent progress has visual aspect that is most excitin.

    I have been following along since a few months before you took "sick leave" and am pretty sure I know about every square inch of the boat, However I did have one question, and forgive my senility or lack of boat knowledge, but what is that hole directly behind the mast opening? Probably a dumb question, but it gave an excuse to stick my nose in and say hi.

    Thanks for sharing your magnificent talent, You are an inspiration.

    Glen

  6. #4906
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by tooljunki View Post
    Ahoy captain, pleasure to be speakin to you again, and I must say that your recent progress has visual aspect that is most excitin.

    I have been following along since a few months before you took "sick leave" and am pretty sure I know about every square inch of the boat, However I did have one question, and forgive my senility or lack of boat knowledge, but what is that hole directly behind the mast opening? Probably a dumb question, but it gave an excuse to stick my nose in and say hi.

    Thanks for sharing your magnificent talent, You are an inspiration.

    Glen

    Thank you, Glen, that's very kind.

    Long have I waited for someone to ask about the oval hole, but I wait no longer. The hole is a hawse hole and I have a bronze fitting with a lid that fits over the hole. The centerline placement was the only place that worked as there is a shelf below the deck. Fortunately the boom is some distance above the hole so there shouldn't be much interference.

    The glassing of the deck continues, slowed down somewhat by some fairing taking place on the forward deck. The glass sheathing of the deck gets secured along its outer perimeter by the toe rail, and the inner perimeter by the cabin side. Instead of ending the glass at the stem, or running the glass up the stem, an uglier but more effective solution, I have decided to undercut the stem timber and run the glass into the groove. There will be four layers of glass in this area, two cloth and two Dynel, and they should all but fill the groove with material. Any remaining space will be filled with epoxy putty and sanded smooth. The purpose is to get a nice clean edge that will not be inclined to open up.



  7. #4907
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    OK, perhaps I've had too much Merlot with dinner, but shouldn't the hawse hole be before the mast, not aft? Is that for the anchor line? Second question: When did that hole appear? I gotta lay off the Merlot....

    Edited: I keep forgetting how close to the bow that mast is. So... the hawse hole probably works best where it is. Anchor line heads off at an angle to a chock?
    Last edited by Rich Jones; 05-13-2018 at 07:01 PM.
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

  8. #4908
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Jones View Post
    OK, perhaps I've had too much Merlot with dinner, but shouldn't the hawse hole be before the mast, not aft? Is that for the anchor line? Second question: When did that hole appear? I gotta lay off the Merlot....

    Edited: I keep forgetting how close to the bow that mast is. So... the hawse hole probably works best where it is. Anchor line heads off at an angle to a chock?

    Page 138, Rich, post #4804 was the first image with the hawse hole cut in. And, yes, the hawse is for the anchor line and possibly a second line

    Here's the situation. There's a shelf in the forepeak, in front of the mast and continuing down both sides, which would prevent a line from falling directly to the grate below. The only place to put the hawse was on the centerline, and even then the options were limited.

    There will be a pair of cleats on the deck and a pair of chocks in the toerail. Also on the forward deck will be the two ventilators and a pair of pad eyes. The pad eye go each side of the mast and will be used to secure the double turning blocks for the halyards and topping lifts.

    Jim



  9. #4909
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Congrats on the tenth anniversary.

    I got a couple of questions for you Jim. If you wouldn’t mind?

    did you consider using Peel Ply on the dynel decks? If you discounted it, why so?

    Also on that join between stem and deck, given the potential for movement, why epoxy and not some poly type goo that can flex a bit? Does the top layer of ply go into that joint at all?

    thanks

  10. #4910
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by andrewpatrol View Post
    Congrats on the tenth anniversary.

    I got a couple of questions for you Jim. If you wouldn’t mind?

    did you consider using Peel Ply on the dynel decks? If you discounted it, why so?

    Also on that join between stem and deck, given the potential for movement, why epoxy and not some poly type goo that can flex a bit? Does the top layer of ply go into that joint at all?

    thanks

    No, Andrew, I didn't consider using peel ply. Not because it's not a good idea, but because I'm not familiar with it. I put down the Dynel one layer at a time using a squeegee. Because the dynel has a tendency to float on the resin I squeegeed it hard initially to make sure there was no excess resin. A few hours later I topcoated with more resin. Sand, apply second layer.

    As for the stem joint...the top layer of ply butts the stem, and, as you might recall is bedded in 5200. The mahogany edge strips are let into the stem, which is the reason they had to be glued on after the ply was glued down. I see practically no chance of any movement anywhere between the stem and deck and am quite confident that the glass/stem seam will remain tight over time.

    Jim

  11. #4911
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Jim, once this boat is, gulp, finished... You're surely not going to intentionally just throw it in the sea are you? There's all kinds of critters, bird poop, water, rocks and other hazards out there ya know. That would be a reckless, insane thing to do.

    Please soothe my worried mind and say it ain't so.

  12. #4912
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by lupussonic View Post
    Jim, once this boat is, gulp, finished... You're surely not going to intentionally just throw it in the sea are you? There's all kinds of critters, bird poop, water, rocks and other hazards out there ya know. That would be a reckless, insane thing to do.

    Please soothe my worried mind and say it ain't so.

    You forgot to mention the morning dew and the autumns freeze working to get a prying finger under all that paintwork.

  13. #4913
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Ledger View Post
    You forgot to mention the morning dew and the autumns freeze working to get a prying finger under all that paintwork.
    I've read that the first early morning job of a paid crew is to wipe the morning dew off the woodwork and especially the brightwork. This isn't so the owner's fanny wouldn't get wet, but to prevent the sun from using that dew as a prism to damage the varnish.
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

  14. #4914
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Jones View Post
    I've read that the first early morning job of a paid crew is to wipe the morning dew off the woodwork and especially the brightwork. This isn't so the owner's fanny wouldn't get wet, but to prevent the sun from using that dew as a prism to damage the varnish.
    Morning dew created in a salt environment is a bit salty and will actually work as a "paint stripper" of sorts when left un-chamois . And salt air dew does not dry as fast as freshwater dew.

  15. #4915
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Jones View Post
    I've read that the first early morning job of a paid crew is to wipe the morning dew off the woodwork and especially the brightwork. This isn't so the owner's fanny wouldn't get wet, but to prevent the sun from using that dew as a prism to damage the varnish.
    I'm supposed to get paid for doing that? Who knew? I'll PM you for where you can send the check.

    For a musical break (& a blast from the past):

    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  16. #4916
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by lupussonic View Post
    Jim, once this boat is, gulp, finished... You're surely not going to intentionally just throw it in the sea are you? There's all kinds of critters, bird poop, water, rocks and other hazards out there ya know. That would be a reckless, insane thing to do.

    Please soothe my worried mind and say it ain't so.
    Really, folks, after this thread, the steering quadrant, boom jaws, bits - I have this kind of feeling that Jim's next project will turn out to be a 200+ page, 15 year long epic which knocks everybody's socks off !!!! After all, look what we have witnessed so far !!!!

    Seriously, Jim, this has been a fantastic, well-documented build. Thanks again for letting us watch your progress



    Rick

  17. #4917
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    The beauty in building it "furniture grade" is that if you're too paranoid to put it in the water, it would look great there in the living room, across from the sofa.

    Glen
    Last edited by tooljunki; 05-15-2018 at 03:17 PM.

  18. #4918
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    I'm looking forward to seeing the launching party pictures/video. Jim you should open a go fund me page to ensure you have adequate funds for all the booze and food all your friends will require.

  19. #4919
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Jones View Post
    I've read that the first early morning job of a paid crew is to wipe the morning dew off the woodwork and especially the brightwork. This isn't so the owner's fanny wouldn't get wet, but to prevent the sun from using that dew as a prism to damage the varnish.

    T'would be a bitter pill, Rich, for a proud man to wipe dew off'n somebody elses boat fer pay.



    Quote Originally Posted by erster View Post
    Morning dew created in a salt environment is a bit salty and will actually work as a "paint stripper" of sorts when left un-chamois .

    Unless, Mike, you had a bit of paintwork you needed removing. Then it wouldn't. Law of the Sea and all that.


    Quote Originally Posted by Garret View Post
    I'm supposed to get paid for doing that? Who knew? I'll PM you for where you can send the check.

    Get ahold of Rich Jones, Garret, he owns enough brightwork to make it worth it.


    Quote Originally Posted by hawkeye54 View Post
    Really, folks, after this thread, the steering quadrant, boom jaws, bits - I have this kind of feeling that Jim's next project will turn out to be a 200+ page, 15 year long epic which knocks everybody's socks off !!!! After all, look what we have witnessed so far !!!!

    Seriously, Jim, this has been a fantastic, well-documented build. Thanks again for letting us watch your progress

    Rick
    Thanks, Rick, there'll be some good stuff coming along shortly, bear with me here.


    Quote Originally Posted by tooljunki View Post
    The beauty in building it "furniture grade" is that if you're too paranoid to put it in the water, it would look great there in the living room, across from the sofa.

    Glen

    She's going in, Glen, never doubt it! I might as well dump her into a vat of flaming acid, but she's going in.


    Quote Originally Posted by navydog View Post
    I'm looking forward to seeing the launching party pictures/video. Jim you should open a go fund me page to ensure you have adequate funds for all the booze and food all your friends will require.

    Dawg, I'll leave the go-fund-me business to those that know how to work it. But, if you have a folding table and some chairs, could you bring them?





    Here's yesterdays progress.

    This is the first layer of Dynel to go on the foredeck. The material has been sanded off and the edges tapered. Under this layer are two layers of cloth, staggered in width.

    I've been using a belt sander for most of the sanding and fairing. It's considerably faster than a random orbit sander on the flat deck surfaces. The sander is hooked up to a vacuum, which keeps the dust out of the air, but deposits it on the deck. The sander is kept at its lowest speed and is further controlled by the judicious use or the trigger.
    A sixty grit belt seems to work well if used with care.


  20. #4920
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    I already own way more than enough brightwork! No need for me to call Rich - other than to go for a ride in his launch...
    Last edited by Garret; 05-20-2018 at 10:04 AM. Reason: spelink
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  21. #4921
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Jones View Post
    I've read that the first early morning job of a paid crew is to wipe the morning dew off the woodwork and especially the brightwork. This isn't so the owner's fanny wouldn't get wet, but to prevent the sun from using that dew as a prism to damage the varnish.
    Professional crew wipe the dew off every surface, it's a washdown without a hose.

  22. #4922
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Ledger View Post
    T'would be a bitter pill, Rich, for a proud man to wipe dew off'n somebody elses boat fer pay.






    Unless, Mike, you had a bit of paintwork you needed removing. Then it wouldn't. Law of the Sea and all that.





    Get ahold of Rich Jones, Garret, he owns enough brightwork to make it worth it.




    Thanks, Rick, there'll be some good stuff coming along shortly, bear with me here.





    She's going in, Glen, never doubt it! I might as well dump her into a vat of flaming acid, but she's going in.





    Dawg, I'll leave the go-fund-me business to those that know how to work it. But, if you have a folding table and some chairs, could you bring them?





    Here's yesterdays progress.

    This is the first layer of Dynel to go on the foredeck. The material has been sanded off and the edges tapered. Under this layer are two layers of cloth, staggered in width.

    I've been using a belt sander for most of the sanding and fairing. It's considerably faster than a random orbit sander on the flat deck surfaces. The sander is hooked up to a vacuum, which keeps the dust out of the air, but deposits it on the deck. The sander is kept at its lowest speed and is further controlled by the judicious use or the trigger.
    A sixty grit belt seems to work well if used with care.

    Just love the 'patina' on that brush, Jim !

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