Page 139 of 141 FirstFirst ... 3989129138139140 ... LastLast
Results 4,831 to 4,865 of 4928

Thread: Lofting the Brewer catboat

  1. #4831
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    8,109

    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Sailor View Post
    Tres tres cool. Very much coolage going on there Jim.

    Thank you, Dan, I have high hopes.


    This is the most difficult part of laying down the sole, getting the first plank down. After that each one's a repeat of the previous. Not to mention there's something more to walk on than the tops of the floor timbers.

    There will be removable sections, two planks wide, each side of the centerboard trunk, and the space in front of the trunk will lift up as well.



  2. #4832
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Walney, near Cumbria UK
    Posts
    39,293

    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Looking forward to the margin plank.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
    The weakness of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web.

  3. #4833
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Uki, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    25,588

    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Jim it’s a pleasure to look in here again. That really is one immensely strong boat you are building there.
    The definition of stupid has got to be the belief that more guns will negate the bloodshed done with guns.

  4. #4834
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Tuscon AZ
    Posts
    5,196

    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    It is going to be fun to have a sole to walk on!
    I love the smell of fresh cut plywood in the morning.

  5. #4835
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    8,109

    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Figment View Post
    Catboats strike me as a fine configuration for tending the anchor from the cockpit.
    You make a good point there, Mike. On Sea Rover we often deployed the anchor directly from the cockpit rather than go forward. Of course someone had to take a walk to the bow to retrieve the end of the anchor line, which came up through a hawse hole from the forepeak. The anchor itself was kept under one of the cockpit seats. There's plenty of space to stow an anchor in the cockpit or under the hatch, while the forward deck provides few good stowage spots. The forward deck is small and the cabin top needs to be kept clear for the halyards. A muddy anchor can also be hung from the stern chocks for a few minutes of easy motoring.

  6. #4836
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    72

    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    As a learning woodworker looking at those scary-small cruciform section oak pieces, can I ask how you made them? Router table perhaps with generous use of featherboards? Thanks as always for the education you so freely give all of us!

  7. #4837
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    8,109

    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by willin woodworks View Post
    There is a certain proud bluntness to the bow as drawn. I applaud your decision to eschew the sprit. The idea of simply dragging the hook in the water to lose the tenacious south shore muck is appealing though...

    Quote Originally Posted by RFNK View Post
    +1 on elimination of the bowsprit!

    Rick

    I thank you both for your excellent opinions, which happen to align with my current thinking. The elimination of the bowsprit raises a new question...how to shape the top of the stem.

    Regarding the stem head, I got lucky the other day. My wife, Tracey found on the free book cart at the hospital where she works, a copy of "Pete Cullers Boats". "Do you want this?" she asked, "I can put it back if you don't." It contains all of Captain Pete's designs with commentary, the master of the salty detail himself. I had been kicking the idea of running the beveled portion of the stem all the way up, rather than terminating into the block shape at the top, thinking that this would lighten up the look. A big step, hard to keep your hand from shaking cutting into the stem like that, removing that which could never be put back. Something to think about and put off or another day. And then she brings home that book. Plenty of Cullers boats use the block stem top and look great. Thing is, when you use a thick sheer plank and it runs into the stem forward of the line of plank ends below, you just can't make the stem beveled all the way up, something would have to be fudged right where you want everything to be just right. Culler's always using the thick sheer plank, often painting them in a contrasting color to accent the detail, and always with the squared-off stem head.

    Just some musing there. We've got another snow storm in progress today. I had to keep the fire stoked in the boathouse last night, as this keeps the snow sliding off the top. Gotta get to it.

    Jim

  8. #4838
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    8,109

    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by schoonerjay View Post
    As a learning woodworker looking at those scary-small cruciform section oak pieces, can I ask how you made them? Router table perhaps with generous use of featherboards? Thanks as always for the education you so freely give all of us!
    You're quite welcome! I downsized my shop a few years back when I stopped making cabinets for strangers. I kept some of my single phase machines, including a five horse Powermatic shaper, with a power feeder. And my cutters. I bought that machine when I needed it for a job, to be able to run moldings and make raised panels. That machine was what I took home from that job. You simply can't get the quality out of a router table for running moldings, believe me, I tried. Don't get me wrong, a router table is a useful thing but for some work you can't get the even feed and pressure you need without a power feed and plenty of oomph behind the cutter.


    Here's a hint though. The grooved edges are no problem to make with a freehand router and slot cutter, the depth adjusted by the use of a ball bearing collar of the correct diameter. Then the tongue is cut on the edge of a plank, then the strip ripped off the plank on a table saw. Then the strip is tapped into place into a grooved plank and the other tongue formed. Come to think of it the whole operation could be performed with a freehand router if one were so inclined and the cutters available.
    Last edited by Jim Ledger; 03-13-2018 at 08:30 AM.

  9. #4839
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    72

    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    That makes perfect sense, I hadn't even thought of using a shaper! If I may add a follow-on question from an aesthetic/structural point of view, which way would you orient the grain in those oak pieces? Vertically or horizontally? Does it make any matter in pieces with such a small visible footprint?

  10. #4840
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    8,109

    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by schoonerjay View Post
    That makes perfect sense, I hadn't even thought of using a shaper! If I may add a follow-on question from an aesthetic/structural point of view, which way would you orient the grain in those oak pieces? Vertically or horizontally? Does it make any matter in pieces with such a small visible footprint?
    I happened to have a small pile of rift White Oak planks, so I used some of them. I would try to find something with rift or vertical grain, not so much because somebody's going to be on their hands and knees with a magnifying glass but because it's better and makes me feel better about the job and more inclined give it the little extra later on. I could have used flat sawn, it was available. I spent a lot of time agonizing over the choice. Holly would have been the traditional choice, but lets get real, have you ever priced the stuff? English Sycamore is another very white wood, but even that would have run three hundred bucks for the amount I needed. I considered Maple but couldn't get behind it, even though I have it on hand. The rift oak, after a while seemed like a good choice, a similar density and hardness to the Angelique, both with a coarse grain, rot resistant, and a good enough color separation. Not Teak and Holly, but something rougher and still good-looking.

  11. #4841
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA
    Posts
    685

    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Ledger View Post
    The rift oak, after a while seemed like a good choice, a similar density and hardness to the Angelique, both with a coarse grain, rot resistant, and a good enough color separation. Not Teak and Holly, but something rougher and still good-looking.
    was wondering why you were going to the trouble, I like your thinking and the nod to yacht soles

  12. #4842
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA
    Posts
    685

    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Ledger View Post

    Thing is, when you use a thick sheer plank and it runs into the stem forward of the line of plank ends below, you just can't make the stem beveled all the way up, something would have to be fudged right where you want everything to be just right. Culler's always using the thick sheer plank, often painting them in a contrasting color to accent the detail, and always with the squared-off stem head.

    Jim
    Lucky find on the book, Cpt. Pete's details are great. I would hate to see you bevel that stem, such a proud piece of the structure plus the transition from bevel to square is a satisfying place for some self-expression.

  13. #4843
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Central Coast, Ca
    Posts
    19,965

    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Thank you Jim for the update. I ( among many) have been wondering and even worried about what was going on in Catboatville.
    Lovely work and a wise decision not to bevel that stemhead. (I did that only once and regret it to this day).

  14. #4844
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Walney, near Cumbria UK
    Posts
    39,293

    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Ledger View Post
    Regarding the stem head, I got lucky the other day. My wife, Tracey found on the free book cart at the hospital where she works, a copy of "Pete Cullers Boats". "Do you want this?" she asked, "I can put it back if you don't." It contains all of Captain Pete's designs with commentary, the master of the salty detail himself. I had been kicking the idea of running the beveled portion of the stem all the way up, rather than terminating into the block shape at the top, thinking that this would lighten up the look. A big step, hard to keep your hand from shaking cutting into the stem like that, removing that which could never be put back. Something to think about and put off or another day. And then she brings home that book. Plenty of Cullers boats use the block stem top and look great.

    Jim
    It is tradition. That means it has been found to be "right" through time. Good decision.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
    The weakness of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web.

  15. #4845
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Waterbury Center, Vermont
    Posts
    47

    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Jim, Thank you for this amazing resource. I found this thread while searching for information on building a Gil Smith Great South Bay Catboat ( I put up a post last night seeking advice). As a fellow career Cabinetmaker I am humbled at your attention to detail and craftsmanship. I have had troiuble viewing a lot of the photos here, and elsewhere on WBF, not sure why. If you could direct me to other resources I’d be eternally grateful, as I am for this build blog. I still have a couple of years of this thread to forge through, keep up the work.

  16. #4846
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Hills of Vermont, USA
    Posts
    23,985

    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by John Husky View Post
    Jim, Thank you for this amazing resource. I found this thread while searching for information on building a Gil Smith Great South Bay Catboat ( I put up a post last night seeking advice). As a fellow career Cabinetmaker I am humbled at your attention to detail and craftsmanship. I have had troiuble viewing a lot of the photos here, and elsewhere on WBF, not sure why. If you could direct me to other resources I’d be eternally grateful, as I am for this build blog. I still have a couple of years of this thread to forge through, keep up the work.
    Welcome to the forum! Good to see another woodchuck here.

    Many photos in the forum (& forums all over the web) were hosted on Photobucket. A while ago, they decided to no longer allow linking to the photos stored there without paying an exorbitant amount. One can now post photos directly here - but many threads still have links to the ones on Photobucket - as changing them all is a lot of work. However, I did think Jim had gone through the ones on this thread & updated them (days of work, I'm sure).
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  17. #4847
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    8,109

    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    Looking forward to the margin plank.
    There isn't going to be a margin plank, Nick, the decking will run parallel. It would be nice if the decking run underneath the cabinetwork. I suppose that in a deep narrow vessel this situation would be easy to accomplish. Unfortunately, in a boat with shallow deadrise, like a catboat, this is not always the case. The plane of the sole runs into the frames and planking before the cabinetwork begins. One solution might be to raise the sole, but as this results in reduced headroom and interior volume it's not a good compromise.

    Ideally, the light planks of the ceiling would begin at the outboard edge of the sole, but in this case a heavier plank need to be fit to lie on the frames and abut the sole, to act as an extension of the sole. This plank would then extend under the cabinetwork, whereupon the ceiling would begin.

  18. #4848
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    8,109

    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by WX View Post
    Jim itís a pleasure to look in here again. That really is one immensely strong boat you are building there.
    Thanks, Gary.

    I'm always wondering if I'm overbuilding, and I probably am, things could certainly be thinned down if that was the aim. When you look at a particular part of the boat, as you do when looking at a photo of a portion of the structure, it looks like too much, overbuilt. However, what is difficult to convey in photos is the size of the entire boat, due to the impossibility of being able to stand back far enough. When the boat is viewed in total the individual parts of the structure look in scale. She's not a light boat by any means, but neither is she a double-sawn frame boat either.



    Quote Originally Posted by donald branscom View Post
    It is going to be fun to have a sole to walk on!
    You've got that right. Donald! I've been risking my ankles for too long walking across frames while I look for any perch where I can set down a box of screws so it won't upend at the least provocation. It's a real pleasure!

    Jim

  19. #4849
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Walney, near Cumbria UK
    Posts
    39,293

    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Ledger View Post
    Ideally, the light planks of the ceiling would begin at the outboard edge of the sole, but in this case a heavier plank need to be fit to lie on the frames and abut the sole, to act as an extension of the sole. This plank would then extend under the cabinetwork, whereupon the ceiling would begin.
    Which is as close to a margin plank as you can have if I understand your word picture right. Looking forward to watching you work it out.

    These drawings are no help with regard to nib ends and plank endings in clear space
    Last edited by Peerie Maa; 03-16-2018 at 08:10 AM.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
    The weakness of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web.

  20. #4850
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    8,109

    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    This is one of those operations where I'm glad that the bottom of the boat ain't planked up yet. You can see all the chips on the floor that's not in the bilge, but more than that I can stand on the floor. It's not easy, having to get these old legs down there and back up a every time I can't reach the pencil or drill or whatever. But, it's a helluva lot easier than doing this on my hands and knees.

    I'm plugging the screw holes as I go, otherwise they get filled up and chewed up pretty quick.



  21. #4851
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Rushworth Australia
    Posts
    2,737

    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    That sole sure looks purty Jim, given that you’re screwing it down I assume you will be screwing the hull planking on in those regions??

  22. #4852
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    8,109

    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by andrewpatrol View Post
    That sole sure looks purty Jim, given that you’re screwing it down I assume you will be screwing the hull planking on in those regions??


    Yes, Andrew, the planks are screw fastened.




    We're waiting on yet another snowstorm here, just sleet so far and that suits me fine.


    Here is the bottom layer of ply on the bow. The top layer will have to wait for a warmer day. These pieces have been run into a rabbet on the king plank. The top of the king plank was planed flush with the plywood and crowned. The stem head has been roughly shaped, something simple to suit the nature of the boat, not wanting to go too frou-frou here. There's a little bit of piecing-in going on under the clamps, which will be hidden by the top layer.


    Jim


    Last edited by Jim Ledger; 03-21-2018 at 08:56 AM.

  23. #4853
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA
    Posts
    523

    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Appropriate to crown the King plank James! From small cat builder to big cat builder; welcome spring!

    (thanks for your posting n pics, much appreciated)

    Greg

  24. #4854
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Lynden, Wa
    Posts
    3,129

    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    It would be a pity to hide that wonderful tumblehome bow underneath a bow sprit. Besides, you're already paying moorage on that rudder!
    There's the plan, then there's what actually happens.

    Ben Sebens, RN

  25. #4855
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Tuscon AZ
    Posts
    5,196

    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by BBSebens View Post
    It would be a pity to hide that wonderful tumblehome bow underneath a bow sprit. Besides, you're already paying moorage on that rudder!
    You only pay for the rudder ABOVE the waterline.
    This boat does not have tumblehome.
    Tumblehome is a downslope from the deck to the side of the hull.
    I love the smell of fresh cut plywood in the morning.

  26. #4856
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Walney, near Cumbria UK
    Posts
    39,293

    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by donald branscom View Post
    This boat does not have tumblehome.
    Tumblehome is a downslope from the deck to the side of the hull.
    She does.
    I cannot picture what your words describe. Sounds more like a rolled deck edge.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
    The weakness of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web.

  27. #4857
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Vancouver Island
    Posts
    1,691

    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Is that a little v-groove I see in the stem-head, about 1" above top of deck? Enjoying this journey, tks again. / Jim

  28. #4858
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    8,109

    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by gregleetaylor View Post
    Appropriate to crown the King plank James! From small cat builder to big cat builder; welcome spring!

    (thanks for your posting n pics, much appreciated)

    Greg

    Thanks, Greg, Long Live the King!. Speaking of Spring, we had a foot and a half of snow day before yesterday, but I think we've turned a corner.



    Quote Originally Posted by BBSebens View Post
    It would be a pity to hide that wonderful tumblehome bow underneath a bow sprit. Besides, you're already paying moorage on that rudder!


    I agree, Ben, the bowsprit idea has been abandoned.



    Quote Originally Posted by donald branscom View Post
    You only pay for the rudder ABOVE the waterline.
    This boat does not have tumblehome.
    Tumblehome is a downslope from the deck to the side of the hull.

    Above the waterline and hard over, right up against the stops. That should knock off a good foot of length.

    Actually, the boat does have tumblehome, forward and aft. A tumblehome stem necessitates tumblehome in the forward sides.



    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    She does.
    I cannot picture what your words describe. Sounds more like a rolled deck edge.
    Thank you Nick, for the lesson and that most appropriate picture.




    Quote Originally Posted by chas View Post
    Is that a little v-groove I see in the stem-head, about 1" above top of deck? Enjoying this journey, tks again. / Jim


    Nope, Jim, that's just a planed-off flat where the second layer of ply butts against the aft face of the stem, no vee-groove, sorry.




    Here's a layer of Dynel on the aft deck...



    Last edited by Jim Ledger; 03-24-2018 at 04:16 PM.

  29. #4859
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Marietta, GA
    Posts
    9,332

    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Jim, thanks again for the visit yesterday. Incredible work! As you progress I’ll have to stop by again.
    You are close to the Ronkonkama station. Next time I’ll take the LIRR there.
    Fight Entropy, build a wooden boat!

  30. #4860
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    8,109

    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    I'll be looking forward to it, Mark!

  31. #4861
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    8,109

    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    A few years back, when I still had some big timbers left, I sliced of a number of boards from the edge of a wide flitch. I was thinking about the toerails and rubrails when I cut them, although the time I'd be needing them was well in the future. As these things go these pieces were buried deep, not only was timber piled on top of them but a bench was built over them as well, sealing them in good.

    Lately I've been thinking about those choice bits o' wood, wondering just what they looked like and how long they were for their intended purpose. So, after shifting one considerable pile and cutting a little hole in the end of the shed...that's it, to the left of the back door...I was able to snake them out into sunlight.

    Here they are, five, four good ones and one sketchy one, Angelique timbers, rift-sawn, inch and a half by three and a half, twenty seven feet long. Good stuff for the intended use, as these parts take a beating. The rub rail needs twenty-six and a half feet to go in full-length, so a little left over, the toe rail is a bit shorter.

    We're almost to doing these, finish up the ply on the bow and the rest of the deck glassing. Oh, yeah, you can almost feel the momentum!

    'Nother piece of the puzzle...I've been watching Ebay for the last few years, looking for some bronze screws suitable for the toe rails, and, wouldn't you know it, just last month a box of three and a half inch #18's shows up for sixty bucks. They ought to do the job.


    Last edited by Jim Ledger; 03-26-2018 at 01:35 PM.

  32. #4862
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Hills of Vermont, USA
    Posts
    23,985

    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    That's a good price on the screws. I just bought a box of 4" # 18s that were $2.10 each. Ouch! They were for my caprails as well.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  33. #4863
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Milton,FL
    Posts
    83

    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    I always seem to "find" those saved bits AFTER I've gone with something else, memory.



    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Ledger View Post
    A few years back, when I still had some big timbers left, I sliced of a number of boards from the edge of a wide flitch. I was thinking about the toerails and rubrails when I cut them, although the time I'd be needing them was well in the future. As these things go these pieces were buried deep, not only was timber piled on top of them but a bench was built over them as well, sealing them in good.

    Lately I've been thinking about those choice bits o' wood, wondering just what they looked like and how long they were for their intended purpose. So, after shifting one considerable pile and cutting a little hole in the end of the shed...that's it, to the left of the back door...I was able to snake them out into sunlight.

    Here they are, five, four good ones and one sketchy one, Angelique timbers, rift-sawn, inch and a half by three and a half, twenty seven feet long. Good stuff for the intended use, as these parts take a beating. The rub rail needs twenty-six and a half feet to go in full-length, so a little left over, the toe rail is a bit shorter.

    We're almost to doing these, finish up the ply on the bow and the rest of the deck glassing. Oh, yeah, you can almost feel the momentum!

    'Nother piece of the puzzle...I've been watching Ebay for the last few years, looking for some bronze screws suitable for the toe rails, and, wouldn't you know it, just last month a box of three and a half inch #18's shows up for sixty bucks. They ought to do the job.



  34. #4864
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Adelaide, Australia
    Posts
    403

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Ledger View Post

    'Nother piece of the puzzle...I've been watching Ebay for the last few years, looking for some bronze screws suitable for the toe rails, and, wouldn't you know it, just last month a box of three and a half inch #18's shows up for sixty bucks. They ought to do the job.


    I'm almost surprised that your neighbour down the road didn't have a spare box of silicon Bronze screws in her shed for you 😀

    Lovely to watch the boat progress as always Jim.

    Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk
    My First Boat Build:
    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...acgregor-Canoe
    Iain Oughtred - Macgregor Canoe - 15 foot

  35. #4865
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    8,109

    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Here's the latest. I'm about to finish up the last pieces of ply on the forward deck. The final three pieces of deck plywood have been fitted, drilled for screws, and the scarfs cut. The underside of the pieces have been painted with a coat of epoxy to seal the grain prior to gluing. The top of the underneath layer, seen here has also been coated.



Similar Threads

  1. lofting
    By WLG in forum Designs / Plans
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 06-27-2005, 01:02 PM
  2. CAD lofting
    By sbsbw in forum Designs / Plans
    Replies: 29
    Last Post: 07-01-2004, 12:02 AM
  3. Ted Brewer & Comfort Ratio
    By Fishboat in forum Designs / Plans
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 09-13-2003, 08:08 PM
  4. Ted Brewer Deer Isle 24
    By D Gobby in forum Designs / Plans
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-16-2003, 06:24 PM
  5. Chappiquiddick by Ted Brewer
    By Roger Stouff in forum Designs / Plans
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 12-08-2002, 01:50 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •