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Thread: Lofting the Brewer catboat

  1. #5356
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    I have been using the very fine Fuller taper bits and counter sinks and plug cutters for 46 years, and the only problem is the tapers cannot be sharpened, you have to replace them. Well they are somewhat expensive also.
    Not sure why the bias against them here is all about. The length of the taper needs to be adjusted slightly longer or shorter for hardwoods versus softwoods.
    When I was an apprentice, if I tried to drill the same hole three times for one fastener I would have been thrown out onto the street instantly.

  2. #5357
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Ledger View Post
    Anyone have a source for 5/8" brass half oval? Online Metals carries 1/2 and 3/4" and the prices are reasonable, about $35 for a twelve foot length of the 3/4". I have a quote for $75 a length as a last resort from Busby Metal, but it's a special order. Jamestown Distributors is way off the map at about $150/length.
    How much will you have to plane off that tapered rail to get to a 3/4" face? Running away jinking and diving
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  3. #5358
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat


  4. #5359
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Schweiss View Post
    I have been using the very fine Fuller taper bits and counter sinks and plug cutters for 46 years, and the only problem is the tapers cannot be sharpened, you have to replace them. Well they are somewhat expensive also.
    Not sure why the bias against them here is all about. The length of the taper needs to be adjusted slightly longer or shorter for hardwoods versus softwoods.
    When I was an apprentice, if I tried to drill the same hole three times for one fastener I would have been thrown out onto the street instantly.
    Check with Fuller. They will sharpen them.
    "The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails."
    -William A. Ward



  5. #5360
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Thanks, never thought of that!

  6. #5361
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Schweiss View Post
    I have been using the very fine Fuller taper bits and counter sinks and plug cutters for 46 years, and the only problem is the tapers cannot be sharpened, you have to replace them. Well they are somewhat expensive also.
    Not sure why the bias against them here is all about. The length of the taper needs to be adjusted slightly longer or shorter for hardwoods versus softwoods.
    When I was an apprentice, if I tried to drill the same hole three times for one fastener I would have been thrown out onto the street instantly.

    Thank you for that, Paul. Fuller, indeed makes a fine line of plug cutters, counterbores and bits. I meant in no way to disparage them, only to tease some fun out of the inevitable end of one taper bit. For what it's worth it didn't get black and dull sitting in the nice wood box.

    I do like the apprentice trick and I wish I had only known it way back when. Prolly could have saved myself some fuss and regret.




    Here's the back end of the rail, all fastened off. The aft two fasteners will be quarter inch bolts. What you see here are temporary bolts with nuts each end.

    Jim



  7. #5362
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    No Worries Jim! It's funny how when I get in a hurry and ignore both the black build up and increased drilling pressure from a dull Fuller bit, that I split a plank and go nicely backwards.
    Those last two temporary fasteners, aren't they going into transom knees, or maybe even decking? Are you going to use a hanger bolt?

  8. #5363
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Ledger View Post
    Thank you for that, Paul. Fuller, indeed makes a fine line of plug cutters, counterbores and bits. I meant in no way to disparage them, only to tease some fun out of the inevitable end of one taper bit. For what it's worth it didn't get black and dull sitting in the nice wood box.

    I do like the apprentice trick and I wish I had only known it way back when. Prolly could have saved myself some fuss and regret.




    Here's the back end of the rail, all fastened off. The aft two fasteners will be quarter inch bolts. What you see here are temporary bolts with nuts each end.

    Jim


    ahhhhhhh, glad to see her home.

  9. #5364
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    "ahhhhhhh, glad to see her home."

    I know the feeling Jim.

    Are you considering the stud bar I suggested in my PM to you describing how to avoid this problem?
    There is after all a canny stress built in there.

  10. #5365
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Ledger View Post
    Thank you for that, Paul. Fuller, indeed makes a fine line of plug cutters, counterbores and bits. I meant in no way to disparage them, only to tease some fun out of the inevitable end of one taper bit. For what it's worth it didn't get black and dull sitting in the nice wood box.

    I do like the apprentice trick and I wish I had only known it way back when. Prolly could have saved myself some fuss and regret.




    Here's the back end of the rail, all fastened off. The aft two fasteners will be quarter inch bolts. What you see here are temporary bolts with nuts each end.

    Jim


    Jim, I hadn't noticed the cabinetry in the back ground earlier, that is a bit of a project all on it's own. Nice job.

  11. #5366
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    ^ I think those cabinets are from Ikea.
    His other shop has even nicer ones. After all, cabinet making was Jim's bread and butter for many years.
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

  12. #5367
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Schweiss View Post
    Those last two temporary fasteners, aren't they going into transom knees, or maybe even decking? Are you going to use a hanger bolt?
    Those two fasteners are through bolts, Paul, some quarter inch bronze rod, threaded both ends. Long-time readers might recall that there's thick Locust blocking under the aft deck continuing two additional frame bays forward. The bolt holes exit underneath the blocking on a shallow angle. Two pockets were cut with chisel and gouge to make a landing for the nuts and washers. When the rail is permanently attached I will make headed bolts that will sit flush.


    The cabinetwork is from my old shop. The two units were set up in the basement but were suffering from the dampness, so I moved them to the current location. It's a nice sixteen foot run with clearance both ends, so for working on planks and long pieces it's pretty handy. They're no award-winners but they certainly not Ikea.

    Jim

  13. #5368
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Ledger View Post
    Those two fasteners are through bolts, Paul, some quarter inch bronze rod, threaded both ends. Long-time readers might recall that there's thick Locust blocking under the aft deck continuing two additional frame bays forward. The bolt holes exit underneath the blocking on a shallow angle. Two pockets were cut with chisel and gouge to make a landing for the nuts and washers. When the rail is permanently attached I will make headed bolts that will sit flush.


    Jim
    An ideal location for "T" headed bolts if they could be procured in bronze.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  14. #5369
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    An ideal location for "T" headed bolts if they could be procured in bronze.

    That'd be a big "if", Nick. I'm going to thread a nut on one end of some bronze rod and hit it with a spot of weld, chuck it in the lathe and turn it round. There won't be much of a "seat" but the wood is hard enough that it won't matter.

    Jim

  15. #5370
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Ledger View Post
    That'd be a big "if", Nick. I'm going to thread a nut on one end of some bronze rod and hit it with a spot of weld, chuck it in the lathe and turn it round. There won't be much of a "seat" but the wood is hard enough that it won't matter.

    Jim
    If you can get a reliable weld, rather than just a thread locking tack weld, fabricate some. Use square bar for the T, drill to take a shouldered down shank, countersink for the weld, and a fillet weld round under the head should do it. Is the rail already counterbored for those temporary nuts?
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  16. #5371
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    [QUOTE=Jim Ledger;5773911]





    The cabinetwork is from my old shop. The two units were set up in the basement but were suffering from the dampness, so I moved them to the current location. It's a nice sixteen foot run with clearance both ends, so for working on planks and long pieces it's pretty handy. They're no award-winners but they certainly not Ikea.

    Jim[/QUOTE

    Jim, I was about to ask about those cabinets / drawers - they look great and are / would be quite useful - they sort of suggested the old library card catalogs --- As far as 'no award winners' they far outstrip my cabinet making abilities

  17. #5372
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Ledger View Post
    I'll say this in favor of the tapered bit I'm using. The small point of the taper bit follows the pilot hole nicely, whereas, if you try to drill the shank diameter with, say, a quarter inch bit you can easily go off course and misalign the holes. The vicious grab of the tapered bit is an annoyance but it can be minimized if you expect it.

    I like a piece of masking tape on the bit as a depth indicator. There's always a roll laying around and you don't need an allen wrench. I like to make a little flag, as opposed to wrapping the tape completely around the bit, it's easier to get rid of.

    Lil' shop tip.

    Jim
    Jim, try a piece of teflon tape for a fast and easy depth gauge, leaves no adhesive on the bit.

    Happy New Year everyone!

  18. #5373
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by tooljunki View Post
    Jim, try a piece of teflon tape for a fast and easy depth gauge, leaves no adhesive on the bit.

    I'm trying to understand why this never occurred to me! Thanks for a most useful tip!


    While I work through the second verse of this tune I'd like to make a few observations about the shaping of the rub rails and toe rails. It's quite possible to know how to do a thing, which steps to take and in what order, and yet still have to work out and improve the actual details of doing so as the work progresses.

    These four parts can be used to illustrate an interesting and useful technique that can be used in other situations when faced with similar problems.

    The planing of a twisting bevel on the edge of a piece is a common technique used in boat building, the twisting outer and inner face of sawn frames, carvel plank edges planed to fit tightly together, to note just two. Our task here is simplified somewhat as the planed faces need only be fair and do not have to fit against other mating pieces

    Let's start with an overview of the bench and portside rubrail. Because of the trapezoidal cross section the first problem is one of clamping, solved for the most part by screwing or clamping blocks to the benchtop that the piece can then be clamped to. The piece gets shifted and the block relocated as needed to allow planing of any particular section. This is the orientation needed for planing the top edge, the slant facing outboard. To plane the underside the piece needs to be taken outside and turned around so the slope is similar.

    We are looking at the forward end here...


  19. #5374
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Ledger View Post
    I'm trying to understand why this never occurred to me! Thanks for a most useful tip!...

    You're welcome! Your response will be suitably framed, and hung above the mantle. thanks, Glen.

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