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Thread: Lofting the Brewer catboat

  1. #5566
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by tooljunki View Post
    could be the beginning of the long awaited cabin?

    Glen

    Yes it is, Glen, and I expect the result to be absolutely stunning, a real treat for those who happen to enjoy a bit of elliptical cabinery.

    To begin, let's refer back to the cross section. Mr. Brewer has kindly supplied me with the jumping-off point, almost an afterthought, showing a Teak sill under the cabin side with some trim inside. An easy enough thing to draw in a section, somewhat less so to build in three dimensions. But what ain't, hey? A start's a start.







  2. #5567
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    [QUOTE=ahamaywine;5886113]I love to watch your craftsmanship Jim, Thank you for continuing to share. Also, Really appreciate the video - I show this to my fifth graders every year that I start a piano unit at my school. And then I will dismantle most of an upright piano in front of them and let them play with it as I do. Old upright pianos are a dime a dozen, and the experience is invaluable in todayís tech saturated world .

    I'm glad you enjoyed the video, maywine, it's one of my favorites. I love the idea of deconstructing a piano with some interested young folks. You can never tell what might spark the imagination and this is an excellent approach. I assume you de-tension the instrument beforehand. I'm sorry, but I had to ask.

    Welcome to the thread and I look forward to hearing from you again.

    Jim

  3. #5568
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Hmm. Is there much feedback from older boats as to how that cabin side structure holds up?
    Recalling Marcha's advice that the deck should be able to take a crew member dropping onto it from a height, the inboard ends of the half beams look to be a bit short of adequate support. Are they bolted up into the cabin/ cockpit sides? I would have expected a carlin or shelf to support/secure the ends of the roof beams as well.
    I do like the drip gutter, grab provided by the upstand of the inner trim strip.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
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  4. #5569
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    I do like the drip gutter, grab provided by the upstand of the inner trim strip.

    That's gonna be different, Nick, no gutter, no handgrab.

    Sorry.

    Jim

  5. #5570
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Ledger View Post
    You make a good point, Jake, there should be some inward lean to the face of the "molding. It would improve the visuals.

    There is another factor that is going to affect the angle of the molding face, and that's the angle out of plumb of the cabin side. The cabin sides lean inboard at a constant angle all the way down the sides. However, the front center portion stands plumb, as does the straight section going across the cockpit aft. The sides/coaming will roll from plumb to canted while winding through the aft corners and the curved sections forward. So, the angle on the face of the sill/molding should match the canted cabin side while keeping the same slant as it goes through the plumb sections. That's the plan, such as it is. S'all I got.



    Meanwhile...using those cute little cross-section diagrams we can pick up actual measurements that can be transferred onto the, in this case, side piece. Connecting the dots with a batten in the usual manner produces a line that's probably pretty close to being correct.

    There's not much change in section along the sides, as can be seen from the eveness of the batten. The big changes happen on the curved sections where, instead of pitching down due to the deck crown the deck pitches up in the ends of the boat. There's the fun!

    Jim



    Jim, I don't know if you'very mentioned it - but what is the function / purpose of the black box above the green area behind the power planer ?


    Rick

  6. #5571
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by hawkeye54 View Post
    Jim, I don't know if you'very mentioned it - but what is the function / purpose of the black box above the green area behind the power planer ?


    Rick

    Rick, I'm seeing a pair of hearing protectors and a pile of one-by-sixes, which one of them looks like a black box? Truth be told, I use very few black boxes, it's mostly squinting and guesswork, kinda like throwing rocks into the fog and hoping to hit a duck.



    Let's get started with an easy one, the piece across the aft deck. This one's easy because it keeps the same cross section all the way across, being nearly straight. It's sawn out of a single plank, rather than being laminated like the rest. That being so it has to be bent in to the crown of the deck.

    The aft edge of the piece has been roughed near the finished height of 3/4".

    The wedge sitting on the piece with the level on top indicated the angle of declivity of the top of the piece. This angle will be maintained on the tops of all the pieces all around the opening.

    The tricky part is how to maintain the outboard height, which is what will show in the finished work, and the same declivity, which will be the seat of the cabin side, all around as the deck perambulates from pitch fore and aft through crown down the sides.

    Jim



  7. #5572
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Oops, sorry, Jim - my tired eyes saw something that was not there - I return control of this thread to its rightful owner !

  8. #5573
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by hawkeye54 View Post
    Oops, sorry, Jim - my tired eyes saw something that was not there - I return control of this thread to its rightful owner !

    I'm not actually the owner of the thread, Rick. I am the fountain, if you will, the spring, the source of good things, but I own nothing, all is borrowed and must one day be....


    Holy Bejeebus! who let that guy in here..getimoutahere! Tryna build a boat in here!





    Ahem, now I've explained what's going on and you all know the score we can move on to some of the finer points, where the real interest lies.

    Some of you might be under the impression that nothing ever goes wrong around here, and you just couldn't be more wrong. Why, just yesterday I was down at the landfill with my significant other getting rid of a load of concrete rubble and just getting ready to load up on mulch and the truck wouldn't start. With the place closing in an hour. You couldn't even move it out of park. The errant vehicle was supplied by its builder with a thick, two hundred and fifty page book, most of which needed to be consumed under the gaze of the dump boss who was anxious to get us out of the way, and who bore a more than passing resemblance to Hulk Hogan. Most of the items in the book ended up with "take vehicle to a qualified service representative", and nowhere did it say..."check fuse number twenty three", coz if it did I'd have known to look around for a bit of foil and probably been able to show that crowd of shiny truck, glove wearing jokesters how it used to be done back on the clamboats. An opportunity missed there, for sure. Of course, youtube provided the answer, but unfortunately, it was the significant other who found it..."did you check fuse number twenty three?" It wasn't even a proper tow truck that dragged us outa there, it was a flatbed.



    And sometimes a lamination you've just made finishes up a skosh thinner than you would have liked. That can put a damper on an otherwise fine day. Or, stay with me now, you can stick a bit on where it's needed, as can be seen below.

    Here's the front part of the sill. You can see the finish line on the front. The line on the back is a more sinuous shape, high in the center and low on the ends. The material was added because the batten ran off into thin air in the center.








  9. #5574
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Jumping ahead a bit Jim, will you be laminating or steam bending the coamings and cabin sides.

  10. #5575
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by navydog View Post
    Jumping ahead a bit Jim, will you be laminating or steam bending the coamings and cabin sides.

    The entire structure will be a laminated confection as I'm working alone and the pieces are easier to handle. Even if I had stock suitable for steam bending, wide enough, long enough, and of suitable quality, there is a space issue. The greenhouse would have to be partially dismantled to allow the bend to take place. As things stand, I have a pile of mahogany and yellow cedar planks a quarter inch thick to do the job.

    Jim

  11. #5576
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    The top bevel has been roughed in just shy of the line. You can see the taper that develops towards the ends, where the angle of the deck transitions from a downward pitch amidships to an outboard pitch on the side decks. Clamping the piece in place will allow the top bevel to be checked with the level and wedge.



  12. #5577
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    I leave the strings in place, but dismantle every wooden piece that can be reaffixed - that way I can use the piano to demonstrate for multiple music classes. It’s good to be back on this thread, I’ve been following the project for a number of years now.

  13. #5578
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by ahamaywine View Post
    I leave the strings in place, but dismantle every wooden piece that can be reaffixed - that way I can use the piano to demonstrate for multiple music classes. Itís good to be back on this thread, Iíve been following the project for a number of years now.

    That should be an instructive effort, maywine, there are so few things made today that can be disassembled and rebuilt. Best of luck with your efforts, you never know where inspiration comes from or where it's likely to settle.


    The fumbling forward continues at a blistering pace. After roughing the side pieces to shape they were clamped in place to check the angles against the boat. Further shaping is being done with the pieces in place.



  14. #5579
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    There's much fabricatory similarity between the cabin sill and the rub and toe rails, besides having come off the edge of the same plank. They are all long slender pieces with a constantly changing cross section, and if nothing else all present clamping difficulties on the bench and on the boat.

    These bits can't be just made, in the usual sense, they have to be developed, and in the case of the sill, they have to be developed as a set, roughed, refined, refined some more, on and off the boat, planed, marked...and so on.

    Here is a side piece as the top bevel is being marked. The level and wedge are sitting on a spot that has been planed to the correct bevel. These spots get planed in and marked about every foot and serve as a guide when the piece is removed from the boat. The inboard edge needs to stand plumb and has been marked in the same way.

    Jim



  15. #5580
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Ledger View Post
    Yes it is, Glen, and I expect the result to be absolutely stunning, a real treat for those who happen to enjoy a bit of elliptical cabinery.

    To begin, let's refer back to the cross section. Mr. Brewer has kindly supplied me with the jumping-off point, almost an afterthought, showing a Teak sill under the cabin side with some trim inside. An easy enough thing to draw in a section, somewhat less so to build in three dimensions. But what ain't, hey? A start's a start.






    Maybe my eyes are just deceiving me, but in this cross section drawing it looks like the cabinsides are at best plumb to the world, maybe even leaning out?
    Don’t know if I have ever seen that.

  16. #5581
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Schweiss View Post
    Maybe my eyes are just deceiving me, but in this cross section drawing it looks like the cabinsides are at best plumb to the world, maybe even leaning out?
    Don’t know if I have ever seen that.

    What you're seeing is a distorted image, Paul, most likely a result of the freehand photographing of the plan, there is a definite inward lean to the cabin sides. Plumb sides I've seen plenty, leaning outboard, never.


    Here's a clamping solution you might wanna consider if you ever find yourself in a similar situation, it works, it's flexible and can quickly be reconfigured as needs be...


    Last edited by Jim Ledger; 05-19-2019 at 08:21 AM.

  17. #5582
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    I was just looking at the Facebook page, "Friends of the catboat Paula Ann", which is a twenty-five foot Fenwick Williams design. She's of a similar size to our cat and worth a good looking-over...


    https://www.facebook.com/pg/SailPaul...=page_internal

  18. #5583
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Wow. Paula Ann really shows just how shapely these boats can get.

    Thanks once again for documenting your build, and for not glossing over the back-and -forth from boat to bench, checking and re-checking. It's good to be reminded that this type of thing requires a bit of patience. And that clamping beveled surfaces requires some creativity!

    Mike
    "near it, a small whale-boat, painted red and blue, the delight of the king's old age."

  19. #5584
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Falcon1 View Post
    Wow. Paula Ann really shows just how shapely these boats can get.

    Thanks once again for documenting your build, and for not glossing over the back-and -forth from boat to bench, checking and re-checking. It's good to be reminded that this type of thing requires a bit of patience. And that clamping beveled surfaces requires some creativity!

    Mike

    Wow, thanks, Falcon, I'll admit there's some behind-the-scenes activity going on that escapes mention and makes for a bad photo. None of it presenting much difficulty, it should be noted.



    In case you grow weary of the same photos of the cabin sill, and believe me, you're not alone, I shall further disappoint you by posting a couple more photos of the same and retreading a now-familiar path of how this can be done at home by following these few simple steps.


    Accordingly, we will move on to the third most interesting piece of this five piece suite, the curved portion in the front of the cabin. After some preliminary hacking and choppings to get the piece in the geometric ballpark the final shaping begins. Here we see the piece with a series of marks labeled with a cheery "OK". These are spots that have been planed onto the piece while it was clamped in place on the boat. They indicate the correct angle of the top face as determined by the level an wedge, as seen previously. A close look reveals the high lumps between the markings. These get planed off in a connect-the-dots fashion.





    Once the major high spots are leveled you can rub the surface with a flexible batten and some carbon paper to reveal just how bad your effort actually turned out...


    Last edited by Jim Ledger; 05-21-2019 at 09:07 AM.

  20. #5585
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    She's of a similar size to our cat and worth a good looking-over...


    https://www.facebook.com/pg/SailPaul...=page_internal[/QUOTE]

    Those pictures stir the imagination. Check out the steering wheel. glen

    https://scontent-lax3-1.xx.fbcdn.net...9f&oe=5D592DE3

  21. #5586
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Having shaved off the top of the piece until the marks disappeared the piece gets clamped yet again in position, whereupon a fresh set of flats gets planed in. Less material needs to come off this time as the actual contour begins to reveal itself. The line on the front edge is scribed using the handy wedge sitting under the level and a fiber tip pen. When the line disappears we're on the mark. It's an arbitrary mark but you have to draw the line somewhere. We're gonna leave a bit of thickness where the pieces join and fair them in after the joint is cut,



  22. #5587
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Beautiful work Jim!

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