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Thread: Lofting the Brewer catboat

  1. #4621
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Here's a pattern and a Locust plank. Two pieces needed, one port, one stbd.


  2. #4622
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Companionway bulkhead?

  3. #4623
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by willin woodworks View Post
    Companionway bulkhead?
    Yup. The bulkhead will be made of solid mahogany tongue and groove material. These pieces will go against the planking and have a groove worked into their inboard edge. It's better in this case, to start with one wide piece instead of four separate planks. It's easier to fit these pieces before the deck goes on as their tops can then run by the deck beam for direct marking. Also, once the deck is on it's difficult to get in there to fit.

  4. #4624
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    You had me confused this morning (it doesn't take much), one minute you're doing decking, the next you're cutting locust for something. Now, all is clear.
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

  5. #4625
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Jones View Post
    You had me confused this morning (it doesn't take much), one minute you're doing decking, the next you're cutting locust for something. Now, all is clear.

    You know how it goes, Rich, when you're working alone you have to change hats three, four times a day. There's always details waiting for attention, slowing up the advance of the main force. The general direction of movement is forward, nonetheless.


    These two bits were fiddly fits. They would have been straightforward enough except that there were two welded brackets in the way. These brackets secure the ends of the bridge deck beams to the sheer clamp. It occurred to me that a more forward thinking person might have made the brackets to accommodate the bulkhead tongue and groove as well as the deck beam and through bolted the lot. That would have been elegant, just sublime. But no, I had to notch around them in a most unsatisfactory manner. The only thing to do was to fit them nice and close, a real chalk and lipstick job, not that anyone will ever see them after today.

    The good news is that the difficult part of the main bulkhead is done. Getting started is always the hardest part...except for the finishing-up. The middle bit's the easiest, though, so I'm good for a while yet. The deck is moving along, and now the bulkhead...I dunno which hat to put on next. Probably my sweeping-up hat, give the old neurons a rest.

    Jim



  6. #4626
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    A tip of the cap from this old wood butcher, Jim -- a fine job on those bulkhead pieces !!
    It is always a pleasure to check for new updates on this thread,

    Thanks,

    Rick

  7. #4627
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by hawkeye54 View Post
    A tip of the cap from this old wood butcher, Jim -- a fine job on those bulkhead pieces !!
    It is always a pleasure to check for new updates on this thread,

    Thanks,

    Rick


    Thanks, Rick, I'll try making it worth your while checking in.


    Here's one of the bulkhead pieces fitted in place. The edge is grooved to match the tongue and groove staving to follow. You can see here why it's easier to fit one wide piece to begin rather than three or four narrow staves







    On deck the second layer has been edge-banded and is being fit ready for gluing down. This layer gets glued in thickened epoxy to the first layer.



  8. #4628
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Ledger View Post
    Gonna build me some boat now...because I can.

    Jim
    Love watching you build the boat Jim, one day I'll do the same too i hope
    My First Boat Build:
    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...acgregor-Canoe
    Iain Oughtred - Macgregor Canoe - 15 foot

  9. #4629
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by simonmags View Post
    Love watching you build the boat Jim, one day I'll do the same too i hope

    That's the spirit, Simon! Make it happen!


    Now, for those following this thread let me direct you to this Facebok page. There happens to be a fellow in South Carolina building a plank-on-frame Brewer Chappaquiddick, imagine that! I've only just become aware of this build and will be following with interest...


    https://www.facebook.com/pg/Sea-Isla...d=432590277969

    He's already planked up but hasn't fabricated his quadrant yet or cast any rudder hardware.
    Last edited by Jim Ledger; 08-01-2017 at 01:30 PM.

  10. #4630
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Jim, looks like he built his hull upside-down and then turned it over, whereas your build can be classified as an ' upright'
    build - I have liked the way you partially planked the hull to gain better access thru-out the build

    Rick

  11. #4631
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Are you going to reach out and see about casting a second set of hardware for him? Might be able to do some "tradesies" for stuff he's got.
    If one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours.
    -Henry David Thoreau-

  12. #4632
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by hawkeye54 View Post
    Jim, looks like he built his hull upside-down and then turned it over, whereas your build can be classified as an ' upright'
    build - I have liked the way you partially planked the hull to gain better access thru-out the build

    Rick

    Although we're building the same design there are significant differences in our methods, construction details and construction schedule. Building upside down has the advantage of easier planking, whereas building right-side-up allowed me to install the engine and CB trunk while the keel was out in the open. Hardly a day goes by that I'm not getting some advantage from the lack of planking, fitting bulkheads, being able to reach into the boat, etc. I'll pay for it, Rick, when the time comes to plank the bottom, on my back...alone.




    Quote Originally Posted by Sailor View Post
    Are you going to reach out and see about casting a second set of hardware for him? Might be able to do some "tradesies" for stuff he's got.

    I think we should start slow, maybe have a coffee first, before we start casting envious glances around each others pile of goodies. It's really interesting to me, seeing someone else's approach to the same problems I encounter.





    Here's the second layer of ply applied to the aft deck. This layer was screwed down into thickened epoxy, after having primed both surfaces with straight epoxy. The screw holes were filled in two stages and two coats of resin applied in preparation for the Dynel to come. I was rooting around in one of the storage barns just the other day and came across a long package wrapped in brown paper. It turns out to be a few yards of Dynel, left over from the centerboard trunk. I had forgotten all about it and it turns up at this most fortuitous moment.







    Here is the top corner of the transom, where the edging of the deck runs by the transom itself. It came out okay, I think.



  13. #4633
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Ledger View Post
    I'll pay for it, Rick, when the time comes to plank the bottom, on my back...alone.
    I have suggested this before. Seen it pictured in the Galway Hookers book.
    Finish planking the topsides down to your shutter plank. Then bilge her over to one side to give easier access to the bottom. When that side is planked, bilge her back over the other way to finish planking the other side.
    Here is the top corner of the transom, where the edging of the deck runs by the transom itself. It came out okay, I think.


    Looking good Jim.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  14. #4634
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Ledger View Post
    Here is the top corner of the transom, where the edging of the deck runs by the transom itself. It came out okay, I think.
    Hi Jim,
    You are the master of the understatement.

    Lovely work and thanks for keeping us up to date
    Cheers Mike

  15. #4635
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by m2c1Iw View Post
    Hi Jim,
    You are the master of the understatement.

    Lovely work and thanks for keeping us up to date
    Cheers Mike



    Thanks, Nick, Mike.

    As I mentioned in a previous post I'm working from aft forward with the decking, tying up loose ends as I go. The main bulkhead was started a few posts back and the work continues at a furious pace.

    Here you can see the forward termination of the cockpit carlin, the piece with the short deck beams dovetailed in. I fitted a support underneath that rests on the bridge deck beams. Both the support and the carlin end are housed into the tongue and groove of the bulkhead. The vertical piece of T+G is being marked for the supporting cutout. This piece is the first visible plank of the bulkhead when viewed from aft and extends upward to the cabin roof.

    You can see the welded fittings that hold the ends of the bridge deck beams and the added-on pad beneath the sheer clamp that was added to catch the lower bolts of the fittings of the forward beam..



  16. #4636
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    I always have to work from the longest to short, in an effort to reduce my wasted pieces. Tks for the effort in restoring the pics Jim, which are exceptional to the story you are creating here.
    In contrast to Nick's suggestion, in my imagination I have been planking your boat up from the garboard and down from the sheer. Perhaps this has been covered in a previous page that I've overlooked, or forgotten. Always looking forward to your progress. / Jim

  17. #4637
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by chas View Post
    In contrast to Nick's suggestion, in my imagination I have been planking your boat up from the garboard and down from the sheer.
    My suggestion is intended to turn the horizontal bottom overhead, that requires Jim lying on his back pushing everything up, into having the bottom at an angle, allowing Jim to work on his knees, lifting stuff in front of him, rather than over his prone head.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
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  18. #4638
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    I know what you are talking about Nick, it's the time on my knees I need to avoid. Or have I been imagining my bad knees all these years also. Looking forward to the process regardless. / Jim

  19. #4639
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    ^ Fairy Nuff.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

    The power of the web: Anyone can post anything on the web
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  20. #4640
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Hiya Jim,

    Every time I see you pull out another stick of Black Locust, I twitch a little. I have been looking for it here in the Ottawa valley for 5 years with no luck. I see the tree's everywhere, but it must all get bucked into firewood before I arrive...

    Looking very fine as always. I do have a question - and hopefully it isn't covered back on page 78 or something... but what method do you use to layout your dovetails - assuming nothing is plumb....

    Alex

  21. #4641
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by chas View Post
    I always have to work from the longest to short, in an effort to reduce my wasted pieces. Tks for the effort in restoring the pics Jim, which are exceptional to the story you are creating here.
    In contrast to Nick's suggestion, in my imagination I have been planking your boat up from the garboard and down from the sheer. Perhaps this has been covered in a previous page that I've overlooked, or forgotten. Always looking forward to your progress. / Jim

    I know what you mean, Jim, given the choice I would rather cut the long pieces first, but this ain't one of them times. Luckily I think I have sufficient tongue and groove milled to forge ahead without a care in the world. I'll tighten things up when the pile starts to dwindle.

    I will be planking down further, and up from the garboard after that.

    Good to hear from you.

    Jim




    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    My suggestion is intended to turn the horizontal bottom overhead, that requires Jim lying on his back pushing everything up, into having the bottom at an angle, allowing Jim to work on his knees, lifting stuff in front of him, rather than over his prone head.

    I'm considering it, Nick, but there's only a limited amount of room either side, and I have to admit, the thought of laying the boat over does make me...well, not exactly nervous, maybe leery might be a better word. I'd need a lot of cribbing, more than I have.




    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Low View Post
    Hiya Jim,

    Every time I see you pull out another stick of Black Locust, I twitch a little. I have been looking for it here in the Ottawa valley for 5 years with no luck. I see the tree's everywhere, but it must all get bucked into firewood before I arrive...

    Looking very fine as always. I do have a question - and hopefully it isn't covered back on page 78 or something... but what method do you use to layout your dovetails - assuming nothing is plumb....

    Alex

    Hey, Alex. I found a sawmill up towards Albany on one of my wanderings. I asked them to keep an eye out for some locust and said I was interested in about a thousand board feet. They called me back within a month. It was a buck a board foot, a lot of it was rough but found uses anyway. There was a fair amount of immediate trimming involved to reduce the widths and to cut out pith and sapwood, along with waxing the ends. Tough gnarly stuff, makes every other kind of wood seem kinda soft.



    Now, about those dovetails, let me do a little photo essay to outline the process.


    All the short deck beams were cut to fit against the hull and notched over the sheer clamp using a batten to establish the inside edge of the deck. This batten can be seen blocked up about a half inch to allow the beams to be placed in position...







    Deck beams cut to length...







    Here's the cockpit carlin, a three-piece lamination, cut to a generous profile and laminated in place against the deck beam ends...


    Last edited by Jim Ledger; 08-05-2017 at 08:00 PM.

  22. #4642
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Continuing...


    Here's the glue-up seen from underneath...







    The deck beams get a dovetail cut on their inboard ends. The shoulder cut is plumb, all the other cuts are arbitrary. The dovetails will be scribed onto the carlin...


    [Edited] Let me clarify the use of the word arbitrary in the above. The design of the dovetail is up to the maker, but there are certain points to keep in mind.

    The dovetail angle is more or less standard, steeper for softer wood, less steep for hard, but stays within a definite range.

    The length of the tail is two-thirds of the width of the carlin in order to leave a continuous band of wood along the edge of the carlin for strength. Tho-thirds in this case puts the bottom of the socket on the glue line, a convenient indicator.

    The vertical depth of the dovetail should be less than the depth of the deck beam, again, in order to leave wood on the carlin for continuity.

    The bottom face of the dovetail is horizontal, square with the shoulder. Due to the upward slant of the deck beam this horizontal surface acts as a dovetail once the decking is applied







    Here's the cleaned-up carlin in position for the scribing of the dovetails...







    The trial fitting of the deck beams to the carlin off the boat...


    Last edited by Jim Ledger; 08-06-2017 at 08:22 AM.

  23. #4643
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Here's everything going together. The aft end of the carlin goes into a dado on the deck beam. The front end gets treated as seen a few posts back.

    I know there's simpler ways to do this, but sometimes I just like to have a little fun.





    Jim

  24. #4644
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Thank you for the excellent photo essay Jim!
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  25. #4645
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Thanks for that Jim. Nice and precise.

    That is going to be one heck of a tough structure.

    Alex

  26. #4646
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Still enjoying this build.
    From Tucson now.
    Thanks!
    I love the smell of fresh cut plywood in the morning.

  27. #4647
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    As are we all, except not from Tucson.

    Rick

  28. #4648
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by donald branscom View Post
    Still enjoying this build.
    From Tucson now.
    Thanks!



    Thanks, Peter, Alex, Rick. Donald. it's good to hear from you again, I hope things are going well for you in your new home. Are you making any models these days? I've always enjoyed your build threads and look forward to more.


    I've spoken at length in the past about loose ends in building. They seem to be a trademark in my work and try as I might to tie them up there's always a new crop growing to take the place of the old. It must be a character flaw of some sort, this leaving off of tasks when the going gets a bit tough or boring, always ready to pursue a new project which offers the illusion of progress and excitement. It's sometimes a good thing, putting something off until a good solution presents itself, or sometimes the materials aren't there yet or I have to wait until the rest of the project catches up. But usually it's just laziness keeps me from putting in those last few plugs.


    Today I finished up fastening the sheer planks onto the stem. For the last month since I spliced the new ends on they have been splayed out into space awaiting being clamped home, bored and fastened. The reason it wasn't done sooner was because the underlying structure needed some trimming to allow the planks to lay flat and fair. The underlying structure in this case meaning the end grain of the mast partner, a three inch thick, two foot long dry Locust piece of end grain, which, for some reason or other was poking out in spots and preventing the plank from hitting the frames. This wouldn't be to difficult a trimming task, except the new plank ends were in the way. Anyhoo, trimming took up all yesterday...all...freakin'...day, chipping and clamping and marking and chipping and sharpening and clamping and marking and over and over...and the whole while new exciting ideas of fun projects popping into my head, fercryinoutloud, vacuuming under the boat is better'n this.

    But, in the end I got it tied up...





  29. #4649
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Really beautiful work.

    I guess switching tasks when something gets boring is totally fine...as long as you keep working on one boat only
    I know people that abandon projects, store them away and just start something new...

  30. #4650
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by heavyweather View Post
    Really beautiful work.

    I guess switching tasks when something gets boring is totally fine...as long as you keep working on one boat only
    I know people that abandon projects, store them away and just start something new...

    Thanks, Heavy.

    Sometimes abandoning a project is the best solution rather continuing pouring resources into a project after you've lost confidence. Many times a fresh start, using the lesson learned leads to a better place. If all your efforts come out exactly the way you envisioned them, you're playing it safet. You should be f##king up and starting over on a regular basis.


    I often start projects that can't be finished in the near future, projects that need to be developed in parallel with the main effort. For example, in the case of this boat, the Quadrant project. That project can't possibly reach a conclusion until the cockpit deck and wheelbox go together, but there's a feeling of confidence there that it will work, more so than if the entire project was undertaken right before it's needed. The quadrant's been sitting around for a number of years now waiting its turn. Same goes for the boom gooseneck, another loose end, but when the time comes, or maybe before, it will appear in time to be enfolded into the general fabric of the boat.

    In effect, I need to create loose ends as part of the process, laying in supplies in anticipation of future need, rough cutting material, making parts that won't be needed for a long time yet, if only to nail down some dimensions needed in the present.

    'Nuff said 'bout that.. Here's the next section of decking being fitted...

    Last edited by Jim Ledger; 08-12-2017 at 11:38 AM.

  31. #4651
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Jim, post 4650, I love how you 'just happen' to have a place for the clamps to rest under the lower-most planking.

    Very well thought out, sir

    Rick

  32. #4652
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Jim,

    As much as I like to see the progress to decking and planking I will miss seeing the beautiful interior structure that give it the sweet form. Kinda like looking at the old Admiralty models done in such
    intricate detail illustrating the skill and complexity of construction required from keelson to deck.

    Itchen

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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    Quote Originally Posted by hawkeye54 View Post
    Jim, post 4650, I love how you 'just happen' to have a place for the clamps to rest under the lower-most planking.

    Very well thought out, sir

    Rick

    That did work out well, didn't it? I wish I could claim such foresight as you imply, Rick, but, fact is it just happened to work out like that.




    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Giegel View Post
    Jim,

    As much as I like to see the progress to decking and planking I will miss seeing the beautiful interior structure that give it the sweet form. Kinda like looking at the old Admiralty models done in such
    intricate detail illustrating the skill and complexity of construction required from keelson to deck.

    Itchen

    Mark, when I had the boat framed up a friend of mine remarked how it was his favorite stage of building, when you could see the entire unobstructed sweep of the interior. I agree, but meanwhile I'm doing my best to visualize and make real obstruction piled upon obstruction. In the end there will only be tantalizing hints remaining of what lies beneath.







    The decking impacts numerous areas of the boat, the bulkheads in particular. Progress requires that certain details have to be finalized and a commitment made in the form of a defining cut.

    In this case the bulkhead at the forward end of the head is being marked for the camber of the cabin side. That wedge-shaped piece of plywood is called a declivity board, because I read about something similar once, I think it had to do with setting up frames on an inclined slipway, something I've never done. The idea is simple enough, by setting one side plumb with a level the board will produce the same inclination in different locations. It's a trick that can come in handy from time to time even if you're not framing up a schooner on the beach.

    I scaled the cabin side slope from the plans and it looks to be about one inch in for thirteen inches up. It'll do, I can work with that. A lot of old cats had plumb cabin sides, but there's some advantage to canting them in. The cabin looks less boxy, there's little useful interior room lost, the windage is improved and there's a bit more knee room when walking by.

    Naturally, the angle has to be set "normal" to the curve of the house side, but here we're close enough to amidships that this will do for a start. The bulkhead is too high, in case anyone's wondering, and will be cut down to its true height and crown sometime in the future.

    Cheers,

    Jim




  34. #4654
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    While it's tempting to fasten down the deck plywood as soon as possible I think that a better job might result by doing some painting beforehand.

    After fairing up the deck frame and sheer plank with chalked battens the frame surfaces and the underside of the ply panels get a couple of coats of sealer. In the cabin area the underside of the panels and the area near the sheer plank get, in addition, a coat of primer followed by two coats of enamel. This area, the inside of the sheer plank and the top of the clamp, are easy to paint before the deck goes on. In the future the paint will be feathered out and painted in its entirety from inside, but that job is made much easier having the difficult bit finished beforehand.



  35. #4655
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    Default Re: Lofting the Brewer catboat

    This is one of the scarfs I'm using to splice the ply panels. It's 3 1/2" wide, which is an easy number to remember and looks about right. The panel underneath the ply is fiberboard, which stays flatter than most plywood. This is important because you need a sacrificial panel under the scarf and if the panel has any bow to it it will affect the scarf. I'm making these scarfs individually, as each piece gets fitted, so there's no chance of stacking. They're hand planed which takes about ten minutes, not counting the sharpening which needs to take place after each scarf...or maybe every other. Either way, the glue in the ply does a number on the blade edge, as does the sanding grit which is ever present on the surface of plywood.




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