Results 1 to 29 of 29

Thread: Maryland Crabbing Skiff

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Dawsonville, GA
    Posts
    721

    Default Maryland Crabbing Skiff

    Just because I love the sailing workboats... Has anyone ever built or sailed a 20'-0" Maryland Crabbing Skiff similar to what's described in Parker's Sharpie book? I just think it's a neat design - although Parker does mention they are... Ummm... Interesting to sail - apparently they are quite fast.

    "He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep in order to gain what he cannot lose..."
    -Jim Elliot

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    800 yards from St. Jos. Sound!
    Posts
    1,999

    Default Re: Maryland Crabbing Skiff

    Seems no one has, huh. I considered that for my first build, but opted for the oystering skiff in 16'. The crabbing skiff looks quite a bit like a canoe, so I'm sure it rips!
    If you're considering building one, I say do it!
    Ed Maurer
    Skinny Hull sailing magazinewww.skinnyhull.com
    Florida Fly Fishing Magazine http://FlaFlyFish.com/

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Diamond, Ill / Savannah, Ga
    Posts
    7,109

    Default Re: Maryland Crabbing Skiff

    When I get to the point of building a sailboat for myself, this is what I want. I have a copy of Parker's "The Sharpie Book" in the bathroom, and I have built the crabbing skiff many times in my mind. Having said that, I have landed on about twenty different sailboat plans as "the one" over the years. But this one has been at or near the top of the list for at least five years now. It may be "the one." Time will tell.

    Cheers,

    Bobby

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Monroe, MI
    Posts
    192

    Default Re: Maryland Crabbing Skiff

    Hi, Honda

    I built one of these year before last. Due to a variety of circumstances, I've been able to only sail her a few times with no great success - NOT the boat's fault, my inexperience. Whole lot different from sailing a Hobie 16. If you'd like, I'll try to post some photos.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    800 yards from St. Jos. Sound!
    Posts
    1,999

    Default Re: Maryland Crabbing Skiff

    Show your pics! Show your pics!
    Ed Maurer
    Skinny Hull sailing magazinewww.skinnyhull.com
    Florida Fly Fishing Magazine http://FlaFlyFish.com/

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Monroe, MI
    Posts
    192

    Default Re: Maryland Crabbing Skiff

    I've put photos on the link shown - hope that you can access them. Please let me know if not. They're in no particular order, but you'll ge the idea. http://s247.photobucket.com/albums/g...bbing%20Skiff/

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    800 yards from St. Jos. Sound!
    Posts
    1,999

    Default Re: Maryland Crabbing Skiff

    Nice...is she fast?
    Ed Maurer
    Skinny Hull sailing magazinewww.skinnyhull.com
    Florida Fly Fishing Magazine http://FlaFlyFish.com/

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Monroe, MI
    Posts
    192

    Default Re: Maryland Crabbing Skiff

    As I said in my earlier post, I haven't been able to sail her much. There were difficulties in sorting out the rigging, and some others also. In the few times that I was able to sail her, I found that she's very sensitive to CB position, and also wants rudder angles to be kept small. The times I was able to get on the wind, she seemed quite fast. I'll be able to tell you more this summer.

    One of the things that I may need to do is to weight the CB; it floats.

    Was a lot of fun to build, though.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    SF Bay Area- Richmond
    Posts
    13,176

    Default Re: Maryland Crabbing Skiff

    Looks **very nice**!

    "The enemies of reason have a certain blind look."
    Doctor Jacquin to Lieutenant D'Hubert, in Ridley Scott's first major film _The Duellists_.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Pittsburgh, Pa.
    Posts
    2,699

    Default Re: Maryland Crabbing Skiff

    More pics, please....

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Pittsburgh, Pa.
    Posts
    2,699

    Default Re: Maryland Crabbing Skiff

    Is this Parker's version?

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Pittsburgh, Pa.
    Posts
    2,699

    Default Re: Maryland Crabbing Skiff

    Great looking boat!
    Is it big enough to use as a camp cruiser? I have plans for another double-ended crabbing skiff called "Sandy" from D.R. Goodchild that I might build. It's shorter (18 1/5 feet), and looks a bit chunkier, less sleek, than yours. Also it appears to have higher freeboard and it's greatest beam is forward of amidships which is interesting. It looks like it might be slower than Parker's, (although carries more sail) but might work better as a camp cruiser if you feel your's wouldn't work.
    BTW is your boat (sans mast, rudder and board) too heavy to get onto a pickup's roof rack?

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Monroe, MI
    Posts
    192

    Default Re: Maryland Crabbing Skiff

    Thorne, thanks for the compliment. I count you as one of the stalwarts in the forum; your comments are always pithy and to the point.

    Rigadog - let's see, where will I start?

    O.k., I have more pictures but they're generally more of the same.

    Yes, this is the Reuel Parker design. I've had the plans since about 1994, but motive and opportunity didn't come together until 2005. I plan to use the boat as a camp cruiser (more about that later); there's about 6' + of room in the aft half (not much room alongside the CB). I made the stern sheets removable and plan to build floor boards that can also double as a sleeping platform.

    Unless your pick roof rack has the strenght of a carrier's flight deck and you're Hercules, you won't get this boat up there. I haven't weighed her yet, but estimate that she weighs 500 lbs. +. Keep in mind also that she's 20' overall. So it's trailer time...

    About "more on that later": We all know that it never rains but that it pours. In the meantime, I've acquired a Folkboat at the best price - free! And I know well that much sentiment in this forum is that free boats are the most expensive of all, but I'm retired and have the time to devote to such a project.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    SF Bay Area- Richmond
    Posts
    13,176

    Default Re: Maryland Crabbing Skiff

    Pithy or Pissy, dot's me!

    ;0 )

    What did you end up using for your mainsheet at the stern? Did you attach a block to to rudder head?

    I've had similar issues with my 'faux leg o' mutton' sails on my dory skiff -- love the fact that the mainsheet is out of the way of any crew, but rigging a traveller and/or keeping the mainsheet angle correct is difficult.
    "The enemies of reason have a certain blind look."
    Doctor Jacquin to Lieutenant D'Hubert, in Ridley Scott's first major film _The Duellists_.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Monroe, MI
    Posts
    192

    Default Re: Maryland Crabbing Skiff

    Hey, Thorne;

    In the photo, the boat's not rigged properly; the mainsheet is just wrapped around the rudder post temporarily. I finally rigged the mainsheet block to a shackle mounted on the aft bulkhead, just behind the helmsman's position. The mainsheet has no traveler. I asked the designer about this and was told that these boats were rigged without one, and that it wasn't necessary.

    As it turns out, the mainsheet goes almost vertically from the end of the sprit boom to the block.

    I haven't really tried the rig out yet. What happened after we launched in '06, after a few times trying to launch and recover, my wife and I, found out that it was very, very difficult. I think that you can see in one of the photos that dolly that the boat's sitting on rolling down the launch ramp. With the water being very shallow at the end of the ramp, the stern would hit bottom before the bow was off the ramp, and we had to muscle the boat into the water. Reverse on recovery. To shorten the story, on the last sail that September, the launch ramp gave way, the boat shot into the water and we had no way of getting her back up. If I'd had any sense, I'd have sailed her to the marina about 1000' up the lake, but, being stubborn, I tied her up to the remains of the launch ramp. That night the lake came up...the sound of the boat being slammed against the launch ramp was one of the worst things I've ever heard, and it went on most of the night!

    When I went to survey the damage the following morning, it consisted mostly of part of the coaming stove in. I spent most of the summer of '07 rebuilding the launch ramp (you could now drive a truck down it), repairing the coaming, putting in stern sheets, etc., etc., and so never did get to sail, which I plan to rectify as soon as the ice is off the lake. I'll let you know how it goes.

    Sorry to be so long-winded.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    SF Bay Area- Richmond
    Posts
    13,176

    Default Re: Maryland Crabbing Skiff

    Ouch!

    I've learned to carry an anchor (actually two) for these sort of situations.

    Nearly had to anchor my dory skiff out in similar conditions, as at the time I had a pin to hold the CB fully down because I didn't get enough lead in the board.

    Hit bottom, bent the pin, and had a heck of a time getting it back out with the board pinned straight down so the boat couldn't be put back on the trailer. Took three of us and two pairs of heavy pliers to get that darned SS pin out of the CB and CB case. Have since rebuilt CB with plenty of lead and plugged the position-pin hole in CB case.

    With the new ramp are you launching off a regular boat trailer? The bow winch and keel rollers are a huge help in getting heavy boats back on the trailer, although my friends and I occasionally still have to swim the trailers when retrieving boats off the beach.
    Last edited by Thorne; 03-18-2008 at 12:26 PM.
    "The enemies of reason have a certain blind look."
    Doctor Jacquin to Lieutenant D'Hubert, in Ridley Scott's first major film _The Duellists_.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Pittsburgh, Pa.
    Posts
    2,699

    Default Re: Maryland Crabbing Skiff

    Folkboats are great. My brother-in-law had one out in SF. Beautifully balanced.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Pittsburgh, Pa.
    Posts
    2,699

    Default Re: Maryland Crabbing Skiff

    P.S it's interesting that Capn Parker in either his book or the sharpie catalog states the boat's weight at 200 lbs. I thought that sounded opotimistic.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Pittsburgh, Pa.
    Posts
    2,699

    Default Re: Maryland Crabbing Skiff

    Sorry. Wrong, That's 250 lbs.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Monroe, MI
    Posts
    192

    Default Re: Maryland Crabbing Skiff

    Rigadog: as I said my earlier post, I've not weighed the boat, but I can virtually guarantee that she weighs more than 250 pounds. The CB alone probably weighs in the neighborhood of 50 pounds. To clarify a bit - I used white oak for the stem and stern posts, the CB trunk posts, and the CB post, which is a great deal heavier than the softwood that Parker specifies, although I'm not sure that it'd make that much difference.

    Thorne: this may be getting off the thread a bit, but how did you add lead to your centerboard? Mine has the same problem as yours did; it floats.

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    SF Bay Area- Richmond
    Posts
    13,176

    Default Re: Maryland Crabbing Skiff

    Used a router to cut out the area, then epoxied in some sheet lead, then covered with glass cloth and epoxy -- the only piece of ply on the boat.

    Figure out how much weight you need, then increase it by about 1/3 -- for that size boat I'd go for 8 lbs +.



    Last edited by Thorne; 03-18-2008 at 06:11 PM.
    "The enemies of reason have a certain blind look."
    Doctor Jacquin to Lieutenant D'Hubert, in Ridley Scott's first major film _The Duellists_.

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    800 yards from St. Jos. Sound!
    Posts
    1,999

    Default Re: Maryland Crabbing Skiff

    Make damn sure the lead is fair and can't get hung on rocks, etc or the board may get hung in the trunk or chop its way through! And, consider adding a metal shoe to the leading edge if you sail in shoals.
    Ed Maurer
    Skinny Hull sailing magazinewww.skinnyhull.com
    Florida Fly Fishing Magazine http://FlaFlyFish.com/

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Monroe, MI
    Posts
    192

    Default Re: Maryland Crabbing Skiff

    Thorne, thanks for the advice and pictures, and "Pernicious..." for the pointers. I have about ten pounds of sheet lead that used to be a shower pan. I was thinking of melting it down into the size of a standard soup can, which is to say, about 3" in diameter and the thickness of the board which is 2 1/2", which at 600 lbs. per cubic foot would give me six pounds, drill a 3" dia. hole in the board with a hole saw and pour it into place. Sounds like I may have to increase hole diameter to 3 1/2", which would give me about 8 1/2 pounds.

    I could do what you did, route a recess into the CB, place lead sheet into it, glass and epoxy it, but I'm trying to limit my exposure to epoxy to an absolute minimum. I've developed a severe allergy to the stuff. What do you think?

    "Pernicious," your advice re shallow water is good. I have a double covering of xynole polyester cloth on the leading edge and bottom of the CB. Think that'll do? It's very tough stuff.

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Ontario and PEI, Canada
    Posts
    23

    Default Re: Maryland Crabbing Skiff

    LakeErieSailor,
    Great looking boat! In 2006, I bought the plans for the 20ft Maryland and the 15ft Mississippi skiffs from Mr. Parker. Last spring, I had the 15ft skiff finish for rowing and I have to agree with Parker's comment in the Sharpie book "hull rows extremely easily and rapidly". By the end of the summer, I had the sail bits done (rudder, CB, mast, and poly-sail) and doing test sails. Like rowing, it sails easily even with a small sail (45 sq.ft.). This year I'm building a larger sail (60 sq.ft.) and doing some tweaking on the tiller/extension.
    I have an issue with the open CB trunk, water spashes in quite a bit especially if there's a bit of chop. I'm wondering if the Maryland skiff has the same issue and what the options would be to stop water from getting on-board via an open CB trunk?
    Thanks,
    .. Denis
    PS Plan on building the 20ft Maryland skiff next year (hopefully).

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    SF Bay Area- Richmond
    Posts
    13,176

    Default Re: Maryland Crabbing Skiff

    I can understand limiting exposure to epoxy, but that means you'll need to be a bit more traditional and careful with the lead.

    I **think** that most folks don't drill all the way through the foil (centerboard or rudder), but instead create a shallow hole to pour the lead into. Bob Smalser has a great web article on finishing a gunning dory, including pouring lead inserts for the centerboard and rudder -





    http://www.woodcentral.com/cgi-bin/r...cles_614.shtml
    http://www.woodcentral.com/cgi-bin/articles.pl#smalser





    If you do drill all the way through, you'll need to run some metal rod (aka drifts) through the edges of open hole and across it, so that the lead has a matrix to fill and is held securely in place.

    Remember that CB's and rudders often hit hard things at high speed, so fasteners and lead inserts need to be securely anchored to withstand the shock and impact -- not to mention the water and rot issues.

    "Don't ask me how I know this...."

    ;0 )
    Last edited by Thorne; 03-20-2008 at 08:49 AM.
    "The enemies of reason have a certain blind look."
    Doctor Jacquin to Lieutenant D'Hubert, in Ridley Scott's first major film _The Duellists_.

  26. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Monroe, MI
    Posts
    192

    Default Re: Maryland Crabbing Skiff

    Hey, Thorne

    Thanks for the links to Smalser's project. Is ol' Bob the consummate craftsman, or what? The points re inserts in the hole and fastening are well taken. I may well decide to go Bob's route.

    Denis, in all candor, I haven't sailed the boat enough (see my earlier post) to be able to comment on water coming through the open CB slot; it seems logical, though. On the other hand, the CB is foil-shaped in section, and the slot is quite a bit narrower than the thickest part of the CB, so maybe...

    In another month or so I hope to able to tell you whether water sloshing through the CB trunk slot is a problem.

  27. #27
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Anacortes, WA
    Posts
    10,009

    Default Re: Maryland Crabbing Skiff

    I didn't build the crabbing skiff, but I did build one of the other boats in Reuel Parker's Sharpie Book many years ago, a 15 foot or so skiff. I'm afraid it really wasn't a particularly good boat for my local waters and I never liked her much--sold her down the river as soon as I could. I do remember that she was quite easy to build and that Parker's instructions were good enough for me as a novice boatbuilder to build her straight from the book with no real problems. I also built one of the Bolger 23' Light Schooners which has a not dis-similar hull shape to the crabbing skiff and she was fast. . .sometimes. . . .when the water was calm. . . .and you weren't trying to sail upwind much. . . . .
    I think I've decided that sharpies are at their best in shallow, calm and warm waters, but there are much more sea-friendly shapes for Puget Sound with her tide rips and chilly temperatures.

  28. #28
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    SF Bay Area- Richmond
    Posts
    13,176

    Default Re: Maryland Crabbing Skiff

    I'd recommend checking other posts on the subject, as I've always had closed-top CB cases. I use the traditional hole-saw hole in the CB top (with a large cork) to give access to the top of the CB if you need to shove it down with the boathook handle.

    As I dimly recall, some folks use bungee cords to hold the CB fully down, allowing it to retract if it hits something. And they may use the same setup, or a separate device, to hold a piece of wood (often lined with some fabric to seal better) over the open CB slot to keep the water out of the boat.
    "The enemies of reason have a certain blind look."
    Doctor Jacquin to Lieutenant D'Hubert, in Ridley Scott's first major film _The Duellists_.

  29. #29
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Pittsburgh, Pa.
    Posts
    2,699

    Default Re: Maryland Crabbing Skiff

    The real question is, will you be able to get a case of crabs with this boat, and will your board have to be in the up position to get them?
    Last edited by Rigadog; 04-01-2008 at 11:43 AM.

Similar Threads

  1. Maryland (Hoopers Island) Crabbing Skiff Rigging
    By LakeErieSailor in forum Misc. Boat Related
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 08-17-2006, 04:44 PM
  2. Rigging - Maryland Crabbing Skiff
    By LakeErieSailor in forum Building / Repair
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 03-25-2006, 02:51 PM
  3. Rigging - Maryland Crabbing Skiff
    By LakeErieSailor in forum Building / Repair
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 03-08-2006, 08:14 PM
  4. Maryland Crabbing Skiff - more pictures
    By LakeErieSailor in forum Building / Repair
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 03-08-2006, 03:11 PM
  5. Pintles and gudgeons for Maryland Crabbing Skiff
    By red baron in forum Tools / Materials / Techniques / Products
    Replies: 29
    Last Post: 11-15-2005, 07:33 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •