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Thread: Tancook Whaler arises from the dead...again

  1. #1
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    Default Tancook Whaler arises from the dead...again

    I am a new subscriber but an old hand, well equipped to reef, hand or steer; plankholder and former first mate on OCEAN STAR (Portland ME) and Cape Horn veteran under sail on the R/V HERO ( built by Harvey Gamage in 1964).

    I build scale plank on frame models and am currently on a Chapelle Tancook Whaler in 7/16th inch to the foot scale. The 1957 Norton Edition of American Small Sailing Craft has an error in the rigging of the vessel. The fore mast is 27' 10", not 24'10" as indicated in the table on the sail plan illustration..e.g. I now have a spare rigged fore mast that is too short....not a problem at 7/16" to the foot...a major problem at 12" to the foot scale

    I was wondering how long it took the builder of SON OF A GUN to catch this appearant transcription error in the published plans...maybe he has a short fore mast too!

    I will send a photo of the model as finished. I always wanted one since I saw BREAK O'DAY in Briel NJ in 1963. She was supposed to have been Vernon Langille's last Tancook Whaler in 1934... She had been GLUVIT'D The kiss of death. There was also a Tancook whaler built in 1964-5 and it was in National Fisherman. We sailed against her in Long ISland Sound in 1967...she was very fast.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
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    Vashon Island, WA
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    147

    Default Re: Tancook Whaler arises from the dead...again

    Welcome to the forum.
    For what's it worth my 1951 edition does show 24'-10" for the Fore Mast stick length in the table on page 167. That seems a little short for a Main stick length of 41'-0" or is it 8". (Hard to read.)
    Do you have a set of drawings?
    I saw the Tancook Whaler "Tiger" at Fishermans' Terminal, Seattle back in 03 for sale. She "appeared" to be in good condition. Keep an eye out. Boats like her tend to end up in PT sooner or later.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
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    West Boothbay Harbor, Maine
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    Default Re: Tancook Whaler arises from the dead...again

    Errors in Chapelle's plans are fairly common. I'm amazed he got as much right as he did!
    “So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.”

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
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    Seattle
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    Default Re: Tancook Whaler arises from the dead...again

    There is indeed a Tancook Whaler in PT. It spent a long time in the yard being restored and is now awaiting the rig. I dont know if the rig exists or if it is just in storage. As of a couple weeks ago, it was one of the few boats in the newly re-built Point Hudson marina. Should still be there... There is more to the story, but I think I'll refrain. She is a very nice woman if you feel like tracking her down though...

    DAN

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Tancook Whaler arises from the dead...again

    Actually the rig on p 167 when measured against the scale has the foremast as 28' 10" that is how I figured it out. The miracle of Xerox helps make the writing clear at 20X enlargement...also helps with odd ball scales line 7/16th's inch to the foot.... The 24' 10" when blown up is pretty much a 24' 10" so there is a transcription problem in his notes or field measurements. The Late Ed Monk Sr told me the errors are usually in feet, inches or eights..but that applies more to tables of offsets. A foot is easy to find, an inch can take a long time to loft out properly...I could never get down to finding an 1/8 inch error while lofting.

    I built a close sister to Ed's first and last sailboat design, the Fritz Fenger Wishbone trisail rigged 42' staysail Ketch CHECHAKO. MORNING BELLS her sister with slight modifications by Monk in 1972, the year he died while working on the detail drawings for her at home. It was a collaboration with Colin Archer and Fenger whoi was living in Seattle at the time ( 1934).She is presently up on the hard in Port Angeles. I built her in 1972 and lived aboard untill 1998. She will be the third model...the next one is an H-28 from Sensible Cruising Designs.

    I will look up the Tancook Whaler in PT whe I am over there next.Thanks for the lead.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Tancook Whaler arises from the dead...again

    Quote Originally Posted by PBecker View Post
    I built a close sister to Ed's first and last sailboat design,
    Am I reading this right? Only one sailboat design? That's not true if I am. I have a friend that has a 1940, 83' Ed Monk Schooner. It wasnt completed until I think 1972. Due to the war the plans changed hands and was finally started in the late fifties or early sixties. A cabinet maker had been saving teak and all the other wood for years with the plans to build it to sail off in retirment. After spending well over a decade doing an incredible job, he and his wife sailed it to L.A. where she decided she didnt like boats. So he sold it six months after completion. Jr. changed the rigging plans from being originally a gaff rig in the late 60's. And made some suggestions to my friend when he bought the vessel in around 2001. Maybe 2002....

    Here it is: That's me behind the wheel too...


  7. #7
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    Stevens Point, Wi, USA
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    Default Re: Tancook Whaler arises from the dead...again

    PBecker, when were you on the Hero? I was the last radio operator on her. Jim.....

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Tancook Whaler arises from the dead...again

    Why the odd scale? Why not use 1/2" to the foot, a common architectural scale? Just curious.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Tancook Whaler arises from the dead...again

    I would think it would be worth it to you to buy the drawing from the Smithsonian at it's true scale . This would be a fully legible , scalable blueprint . You could convert to your scale in one shot at a well equipped copy shop if you liked .
    Last edited by Bill Perkins; 02-09-2008 at 04:14 AM.
    The creation of beauty is more satisfying and joyous than mere possession.

    John Gardner

  10. #10
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    Port Angeles WA
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    Default Re: Tancook Whaler arises from the dead...again

    7/16ths to the foot was due to material. 1mm ~= 1 inch ánd I had some 1mm planking stock...and I had a space on the wall that the case for it would fit in at that LOA and mast height for the model. In retrospect 3/8th to the foot would have worked...next time...

    PB

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Tancook Whaler arises from the dead...again

    Hey Peter! Great to see you here! Hope you post some pix of your boats for us. BTW; I didnt know you sailed on LI Sound then, that is where and when I learned to sail as a kid. The Whaler in PT is docked in front of the Wooden Boat Foundation.
    Fly Fishing Washington's Olympic Peninsula
    http://olympicpeninsulaflyfishing.blogspot.com

  12. #12
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    Port Angeles WA
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    Default Re: Tancook Whaler arises from the dead...again

    If that is the Canadian Gulf Islands in the background than that is the staysail rig I saw in the summer of 2005 (August?) in the distance near the Saltspring Island ferry terminal. I have fuzzy telephoto pictures but not clear enought to identify the boat, but the Gollywobler is pretty distinctive. We would set a wishbone trisail in the same slot. on MORNING BELLS ..self tending and good on the weather and to leeward as well right to full down wind...altogether a very flexible rig.

    I knew Monk designed a lot of sail boats, but no where as many as the power boats he was noted for... a sign of the times he told me as, "... the light weight gasoline engine converted for marine use became available after WW II and no one wanted to sail any more." He did also use the lines of previous successful sailing designs ( The Wander Class 44' -46' ( 6 built...2 for the same owner 20 years apart!)) and a number of smaller sloops and cutters in the 30 foot range.

    He used the CHECHAKO/MORNING BELLS line set for the fiberglass 47' and 54' hulls made in Port Townsend...same lines just stretched top sides above the water line and a bit of keel lengthening... Most Naval Architects did scale up and down successful designs ( e.g. his own boat now in Port Townsend. It originally had a cockpit that was only 1 foot deep...Billy Atkin was a parapalegic and had no legs. I knew his son quite well..only met the father once in NYC when I was very young ( 5 years old) .
    MY father was a contemporary Web Institute trained Naval Architect and knew them all...L Francis. Herreschoff ...McManus, Atkins Jr. and Sr., Fenger, The Boston group and others. I was introduced to "gunk holing" ( wandering about winter boat yards to "just look arround") in the late 1940's on the East Coast from Nova Scotia to Charleston SC...it was an education and we met the builders, designers, repair folks, hired hands and the odd owner...right up to the J class and Large Class boats ( M, K, L as well as Suicide, and other meter classes now mostly gone or in Museums) . There were paid crews still at Marblehead and Cape Ann in those days and they sailed the big gaff and Marconi racers ( 120'-150' after the war for a few years untill the recession of 1950 put paid to them...and were sold for scrap or foreign.

    So there it is...Monks Plans are now with Edwin Monk and Sons Naval Architects..Eddie Jr ( adopted son of Ed Monk Sr.) sold it all to a couple of employees in the 1980's they have all of the historical stuff on Bainbridge Is ...or they did. Including the correspondence between Monk and Colin Archer in the 1920's and 1930's.

    P Becker

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Tancook Whaler arises from the dead...again

    Quote Originally Posted by Iceboy View Post
    PBecker, when were you on the Hero? I was the last radio operator on her. Jim.....

    Sory for the long delay...many miles under the keel sin I last signed in.

    I was on /and off Hero Jan 1970 - March 1970 and Jan 1971- March 1971, in and out of Palmer Sta and the Peninsula..I was the Snow Algae person...but as a New England Fisherman and son of a Naval Architecht from Hingham where HERO was designed I was right at home makine net and welding up trawla , diving and sailing her too. The 3d mate was the guy who ran South Stret Seaport Norman Brouwer. I have the crew in my sailing log still...
    HERO is tied up in Bay Center WA (Willapa Bay, in sighe of the ocean and in Salt water.


    P Becker

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Tancook Whaler arises from the dead...again

    Mr. Becker, have you finished the model? It'd be great to see it.
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

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